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Adele 🇳🇴 📷 🛄 🌎

@adeles_photos

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- Hanging out (KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa). One of the key differences between African and Asian elephants is the tusks. All African elephants, male and female, have tusks whereas only some Asian males have tusks. Why one of these have no tusks I don’t know, but googling I found “an increasing number of African elephants are now born tuskless because poachers have consistently targetted animals with the best ivory over decades, fundamentally altering the gene pool. In some areas 98 per cent of female elephants now have no tusks, researchers have said, compared to between two and six per cent born tuskless on average in the past.” (Fellow travelers - save 15 euro off your next hotel booking – link in bio)
- Hanging out (KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa). One of the key differences between African and Asian elephants is the tusks. All African elephants, male and female, have tusks whereas only some Asian males have tusks. Why one of these have no tusks I don’t know, but googling I found “an increasing number of African elephants are now born tuskless because poachers have consistently targetted animals with the best ivory over decades, fundamentally altering the gene pool. In some areas 98 per cent of female elephants now have no tusks, researchers have said, compared to between two and six per cent born tuskless on average in the past.” (Fellow travelers - save 15 euro off your next hotel booking – link in bio)
- Hanging out (KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa). One of the key differences between African and Asian elephants is the tusks. All African elephants, male and female, have tusks whereas only some Asian males have tusks. Why one of these have no tusks I don’t know, but googling I found “an increasing number of African elephants are now born tuskless because poachers have consistently targetted animals with the best ivory over decades, fundamentally altering the gene pool. In some areas 98 per cent of female elephants now have no tusks, researchers have said, compared to between two and six per cent born tuskless on average in the past.” (Fellow travelers - save 15 euro off your next hotel booking – link in bio)
- After having completed my trip on the 10th of October, I’ve had a week in Oslo catching up with family and friends, before sitting down to try and sum up with a few words what these two months of travelling around Norway has meant to me. It’s felt like a trip in a very small cruise ship, that just happens to be on land. The world’s biggest suitcase, with all the trimmings to equip a place to sleep, make food, and provide an emergency changing room for a country where summer can turn to winter in a moment’s notice. I have gotten to deconstruct my home country as a tourist; reacquaint myself with its layered history, learn its complex culture and assorted people, marvel at its beauty, disbelieving its never-ending grandeur, and at times pulling my hair over its shortcomings. Consistent road work, ferry delays, slow and narrow fjord roads, bridge construction, large amounts of road tolls and shocking gasoline prices. To counter, I have delighted in driving through a never ending national park; jaw dropping coastal roads, stunning mountains views, mystical swampland, lakes of all sizes with laser sharp reflections, misty summits, and desolate beauty. It’s been a story of travelling alone and self-discovery; breaking down stereotypes, challenging fears and conventions, having time to reflect in critical thinking and downright ridiculousness. I have indulged in some great and some bad audiobooks, plus episodes upon episodes of interesting and laugh out loud podcasts. To sum it up: driven 13,200 kilometers, visited 60 of Norway’s 104 cities, spent 56 days on the road, toured 42 of Norway’s 50 biggest cities, covered all of Norway’s 19 counties and 18 Scenic Routes, 15 nights in tent (15 times being rained upon while putting up/packing down already mentioned tent), and 1 hour with my car in a ditch. It’s been simply put.….epic 👍🏻😍🇳🇴 Thanks for following 🙏🏻👋
- After having completed my trip on the 10th of October, I’ve had a week in Oslo catching up with family and friends, before sitting down to try and sum up with a few words what these two months of travelling around Norway has meant to me. It’s felt like a trip in a very small cruise ship, that just happens to be on land. The world’s biggest suitcase, with all the trimmings to equip a place to sleep, make food, and provide an emergency changing room for a country where summer can turn to winter in a moment’s notice. I have gotten to deconstruct my home country as a tourist; reacquaint myself with its layered history, learn its complex culture and assorted people, marvel at its beauty, disbelieving its never-ending grandeur, and at times pulling my hair over its shortcomings. Consistent road work, ferry delays, slow and narrow fjord roads, bridge construction, large amounts of road tolls and shocking gasoline prices. To counter, I have delighted in driving through a never ending national park; jaw dropping coastal roads, stunning mountains views, mystical swampland, lakes of all sizes with laser sharp reflections, misty summits, and desolate beauty. It’s been a story of travelling alone and self-discovery; breaking down stereotypes, challenging fears and conventions, having time to reflect in critical thinking and downright ridiculousness. I have indulged in some great and some bad audiobooks, plus episodes upon episodes of interesting and laugh out loud podcasts. To sum it up: driven 13,200 kilometers, visited 60 of Norway’s 104 cities, spent 56 days on the road, toured 42 of Norway’s 50 biggest cities, covered all of Norway’s 19 counties and 18 Scenic Routes, 15 nights in tent (15 times being rained upon while putting up/packing down already mentioned tent), and 1 hour with my car in a ditch. It’s been simply put.….epic 👍🏻😍🇳🇴 Thanks for following 🙏🏻👋
- After having completed my trip on the 10th of October, I’ve had a week in Oslo catching up with family and friends, before sitting down to try and sum up with a few words what these two months of travelling around Norway has meant to me. It’s felt like a trip in a very small cruise ship, that just happens to be on land. The world’s biggest suitcase, with all the trimmings to equip a place to sleep, make food, and provide an emergency changing room for a country where summer can turn to winter in a moment’s notice. I have gotten to deconstruct my home country as a tourist; reacquaint myself with its layered history, learn its complex culture and assorted people, marvel at its beauty, disbelieving its never-ending grandeur, and at times pulling my hair over its shortcomings. Consistent road work, ferry delays, slow and narrow fjord roads, bridge construction, large amounts of road tolls and shocking gasoline prices. To counter, I have delighted in driving through a never ending national park; jaw dropping coastal roads, stunning mountains views, mystical swampland, lakes of all sizes with laser sharp reflections, misty summits, and desolate beauty. It’s been a story of travelling alone and self-discovery; breaking down stereotypes, challenging fears and conventions, having time to reflect in critical thinking and downright ridiculousness. I have indulged in some great and some bad audiobooks, plus episodes upon episodes of interesting and laugh out loud podcasts. To sum it up: driven 13,200 kilometers, visited 60 of Norway’s 104 cities, spent 56 days on the road, toured 42 of Norway’s 50 biggest cities, covered all of Norway’s 19 counties and 18 Scenic Routes, 15 nights in tent (15 times being rained upon while putting up/packing down already mentioned tent), and 1 hour with my car in a ditch. It’s been simply put.….epic 👍🏻😍🇳🇴 Thanks for following 🙏🏻👋
- Tønsberg is Norway's oldest city, claimed to have been founded in 871. The town has about 35,000 inhabitants, and is surrounded by some of the county's major tourist attractions, including old viking graves and museums. Several streets in the town are named after old kings of Norway. Perhaps the most important landmark in the town is Slottsfjellet, the tower standing on the hill. It was erected in 1888 as a memorial to Tønsberg Fortress, the old fortress, of which just fragmentary ruins remain today. (Vestfold county, Norway)
- Tønsberg is Norway's oldest city, claimed to have been founded in 871. The town has about 35,000 inhabitants, and is surrounded by some of the county's major tourist attractions, including old viking graves and museums. Several streets in the town are named after old kings of Norway. Perhaps the most important landmark in the town is Slottsfjellet, the tower standing on the hill. It was erected in 1888 as a memorial to Tønsberg Fortress, the old fortress, of which just fragmentary ruins remain today. (Vestfold county, Norway)
- Tønsberg is Norway's oldest city, claimed to have been founded in 871. The town has about 35,000 inhabitants, and is surrounded by some of the county's major tourist attractions, including old viking graves and museums. Several streets in the town are named after old kings of Norway. Perhaps the most important landmark in the town is Slottsfjellet, the tower standing on the hill. It was erected in 1888 as a memorial to Tønsberg Fortress, the old fortress, of which just fragmentary ruins remain today. (Vestfold county, Norway)

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