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Kaitlin Barnes

@msbarnes5th

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- You know what’s hard? Close reading biographies of children who lived during the Holocaust. It was also our first time ever close reading because ya know what? I’m still figuring this whole teaching thing out. 🤷🏻‍♀️ I know one thing though—graphic organizers really help my students, especially my struggling readers and ELLs. @pencilsandplaygrounds sent me these non-fiction graphic organizers from her store and they helped so much! She has some that I had never even heard of before, so if you’re looking to add to your collection of instructional aids, check her out! #igconnect4edu #teacherspayteachers
- You know what’s hard? Close reading biographies of children who lived during the Holocaust. It was also our first time ever close reading because ya know what? I’m still figuring this whole teaching thing out. 🤷🏻‍♀️ I know one thing though—graphic organizers really help my students, especially my struggling readers and ELLs. @pencilsandplaygrounds sent me these non-fiction graphic organizers from her store and they helped so much! She has some that I had never even heard of before, so if you’re looking to add to your collection of instructional aids, check her out! #igconnect4edu #teacherspayteachers
- You know what’s hard? Close reading biographies of children who lived during the Holocaust. It was also our first time ever close reading because ya know what? I’m still figuring this whole teaching thing out. 🤷🏻‍♀️ I know one thing though—graphic organizers really help my students, especially my struggling readers and ELLs. @pencilsandplaygrounds sent me these non-fiction graphic organizers from her store and they helped so much! She has some that I had never even heard of before, so if you’re looking to add to your collection of instructional aids, check her out! #igconnect4edu #teacherspayteachers
- Y’ALL. We took a virtual field trip today and explored Holocaust survivor videos, a digital version of the Anne Frank house, and artifacts from the National Holocaust Museum. This was tough and serious stuff and I was amazed how my kids handled it! They came up with questions about what they saw and reflected on the experience, and next week they will do a mini-inquiry into a Holocaust or World War II topic of their choice. Super huge thanks to @ms.mcknights_classroom @joyfullymissj @abigailmcclure for suggesting some of the resources we used! #iteach #21stcenturylearning
- Y’ALL. We took a virtual field trip today and explored Holocaust survivor videos, a digital version of the Anne Frank house, and artifacts from the National Holocaust Museum. This was tough and serious stuff and I was amazed how my kids handled it! They came up with questions about what they saw and reflected on the experience, and next week they will do a mini-inquiry into a Holocaust or World War II topic of their choice. Super huge thanks to @ms.mcknights_classroom @joyfullymissj @abigailmcclure for suggesting some of the resources we used! #iteach #21stcenturylearning
- Y’ALL. We took a virtual field trip today and explored Holocaust survivor videos, a digital version of the Anne Frank house, and artifacts from the National Holocaust Museum. This was tough and serious stuff and I was amazed how my kids handled it! They came up with questions about what they saw and reflected on the experience, and next week they will do a mini-inquiry into a Holocaust or World War II topic of their choice. Super huge thanks to @ms.mcknights_classroom @joyfullymissj @abigailmcclure for suggesting some of the resources we used! #iteach #21stcenturylearning
- I spent my snow day reading (my absolute favorite way to relax) and trying to wrap my head around our study of the Holocaust. I’m complicated and switch up a lot of the books I teach each year, which means I’ve never taught this topic before. These questions will likely be difficult for fifth graders, but I also think we will have some great discussions and stretch our critical thinking skills. Do you have any Holocaust resources I should know about? DM me or let me know below!
- I spent my snow day reading (my absolute favorite way to relax) and trying to wrap my head around our study of the Holocaust. I’m complicated and switch up a lot of the books I teach each year, which means I’ve never taught this topic before. These questions will likely be difficult for fifth graders, but I also think we will have some great discussions and stretch our critical thinking skills. Do you have any Holocaust resources I should know about? DM me or let me know below!
- I spent my snow day reading (my absolute favorite way to relax) and trying to wrap my head around our study of the Holocaust. I’m complicated and switch up a lot of the books I teach each year, which means I’ve never taught this topic before. These questions will likely be difficult for fifth graders, but I also think we will have some great discussions and stretch our critical thinking skills. Do you have any Holocaust resources I should know about? DM me or let me know below!
- @kidlitexchange #partner ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ stars for this historical fiction read by @kathleenburkinshaw! The Last Cherry Blossom tells the story of Yuriko, a young girl living in a privileged family in World War II Japan. Yuriko has to deal with fitting in at school, putting up with her mean aunt and annoying little cousin, and adapting to the constantly changing wartime conditions (think air raids, rations, and funerals). Along the way, she discovers a family secret that rocks her world. Then Hiroshima happens, and her life is turned upside down. Will she ever be able to find happiness again after losing her city? . Although this book started out slow, the ending was action packed. Yuriko’s love for her family and best friend are clear throughout, and the author does an awesome job of helping you understand the Japanese culture and customs of this time period. Due to some heavy themes towards the end of the book, I recommend this for middle school classroom libraries. @amberk1120, this is headed your way next!
- @kidlitexchange #partner ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ stars for this historical fiction read by @kathleenburkinshaw! The Last Cherry Blossom tells the story of Yuriko, a young girl living in a privileged family in World War II Japan. Yuriko has to deal with fitting in at school, putting up with her mean aunt and annoying little cousin, and adapting to the constantly changing wartime conditions (think air raids, rations, and funerals). Along the way, she discovers a family secret that rocks her world. Then Hiroshima happens, and her life is turned upside down. Will she ever be able to find happiness again after losing her city? . Although this book started out slow, the ending was action packed. Yuriko’s love for her family and best friend are clear throughout, and the author does an awesome job of helping you understand the Japanese culture and customs of this time period. Due to some heavy themes towards the end of the book, I recommend this for middle school classroom libraries. @amberk1120, this is headed your way next!
- @kidlitexchange #partner ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ stars for this historical fiction read by @kathleenburkinshaw! The Last Cherry Blossom tells the story of Yuriko, a young girl living in a privileged family in World War II Japan. Yuriko has to deal with fitting in at school, putting up with her mean aunt and annoying little cousin, and adapting to the constantly changing wartime conditions (think air raids, rations, and funerals). Along the way, she discovers a family secret that rocks her world. Then Hiroshima happens, and her life is turned upside down. Will she ever be able to find happiness again after losing her city? . Although this book started out slow, the ending was action packed. Yuriko’s love for her family and best friend are clear throughout, and the author does an awesome job of helping you understand the Japanese culture and customs of this time period. Due to some heavy themes towards the end of the book, I recommend this for middle school classroom libraries. @amberk1120, this is headed your way next!
- It’s not enough to teach your kids to be kind. Teach them to think critically. Teach them to identify injustices. Teach them to use their voice or their privilege to fix those injustices. Teaching is political, y’all. I love flair pens and bookshelves as much as the next teacher, but at the end of the day we are shaping the next generation and I want my students to be able to contribute to solutions in our society. ✊🏼✊🏽✊🏾 (Tap to see some social justice-minded educators that you need to be following, and please tag any more below that I should follow!)
- It’s not enough to teach your kids to be kind. Teach them to think critically. Teach them to identify injustices. Teach them to use their voice or their privilege to fix those injustices. Teaching is political, y’all. I love flair pens and bookshelves as much as the next teacher, but at the end of the day we are shaping the next generation and I want my students to be able to contribute to solutions in our society. ✊🏼✊🏽✊🏾 (Tap to see some social justice-minded educators that you need to be following, and please tag any more below that I should follow!)
- It’s not enough to teach your kids to be kind. Teach them to think critically. Teach them to identify injustices. Teach them to use their voice or their privilege to fix those injustices. Teaching is political, y’all. I love flair pens and bookshelves as much as the next teacher, but at the end of the day we are shaping the next generation and I want my students to be able to contribute to solutions in our society. ✊🏼✊🏽✊🏾 (Tap to see some social justice-minded educators that you need to be following, and please tag any more below that I should follow!)
- Cc: Donald Trump. This was a response from our gallery walk on Tuesday. The question asked kids if all people should be treated equally regardless of what country they come from. PS if this somehow offends you, before you unfollow me, think about the message you’re sending your students. Do your minority students know that you think their life matters? Do your white students understand the immense privilege they have? Do they all understand the systems of oppression and why we all (but especially white people) must work together to dismantle them? #keepingitreal #sorrynotsorry
- Cc: Donald Trump. This was a response from our gallery walk on Tuesday. The question asked kids if all people should be treated equally regardless of what country they come from. PS if this somehow offends you, before you unfollow me, think about the message you’re sending your students. Do your minority students know that you think their life matters? Do your white students understand the immense privilege they have? Do they all understand the systems of oppression and why we all (but especially white people) must work together to dismantle them? #keepingitreal #sorrynotsorry
- Cc: Donald Trump. This was a response from our gallery walk on Tuesday. The question asked kids if all people should be treated equally regardless of what country they come from. PS if this somehow offends you, before you unfollow me, think about the message you’re sending your students. Do your minority students know that you think their life matters? Do your white students understand the immense privilege they have? Do they all understand the systems of oppression and why we all (but especially white people) must work together to dismantle them? #keepingitreal #sorrynotsorry
- Thanks to the @kidlitexchange network for a review copy of this book—all opinions are my own. . I can’t think of a better book to end 2017 with than Ban This Book by Alan Gratz. It tells the story of Amy Anne, whose elementary school is banning books left and right thanks to an overzealous parent and a lenient school board. Amy Anne, who is usually timid and never speaks her mind, decides that her beloved books are worth taking a stand over. During her fight, she makes new friends, accepts her hectic home life, and learns how to speak her mind. . I really did love this book and all of the literary references sprinkled throughout. It also had some wonderful quotes about book choice and reading that spoke to my ELA teacher heart. However, I was a bit confused about the age of the characters. They were supposed to be 4th graders, but I think a better fit would have been 5th or 6th graders, especially given some of the reasons that the books were banned. Despite this, it’s a must-add for upper elementary libraries! @5thwithmrsh, this is on its way to you!
- Thanks to the @kidlitexchange network for a review copy of this book—all opinions are my own. . I can’t think of a better book to end 2017 with than Ban This Book by Alan Gratz. It tells the story of Amy Anne, whose elementary school is banning books left and right thanks to an overzealous parent and a lenient school board. Amy Anne, who is usually timid and never speaks her mind, decides that her beloved books are worth taking a stand over. During her fight, she makes new friends, accepts her hectic home life, and learns how to speak her mind. . I really did love this book and all of the literary references sprinkled throughout. It also had some wonderful quotes about book choice and reading that spoke to my ELA teacher heart. However, I was a bit confused about the age of the characters. They were supposed to be 4th graders, but I think a better fit would have been 5th or 6th graders, especially given some of the reasons that the books were banned. Despite this, it’s a must-add for upper elementary libraries! @5thwithmrsh, this is on its way to you!
- Thanks to the @kidlitexchange network for a review copy of this book—all opinions are my own. . I can’t think of a better book to end 2017 with than Ban This Book by Alan Gratz. It tells the story of Amy Anne, whose elementary school is banning books left and right thanks to an overzealous parent and a lenient school board. Amy Anne, who is usually timid and never speaks her mind, decides that her beloved books are worth taking a stand over. During her fight, she makes new friends, accepts her hectic home life, and learns how to speak her mind. . I really did love this book and all of the literary references sprinkled throughout. It also had some wonderful quotes about book choice and reading that spoke to my ELA teacher heart. However, I was a bit confused about the age of the characters. They were supposed to be 4th graders, but I think a better fit would have been 5th or 6th graders, especially given some of the reasons that the books were banned. Despite this, it’s a must-add for upper elementary libraries! @5thwithmrsh, this is on its way to you!

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