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diaa hadid ضياء حديد

@diaa.hadid

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- On the oily, grey, garbage strewn section of Karachi beach where the city's residents come to splash in the Arabian Sea, we met Shuaib Nawaz, a camel driver. Before he married his childhood sweetheart four years ago, he always bought her Valentine's Day gifts: a small statue of a boy and a girl; a card, a bouquet of flowers. Now they are married with two daughters. “She’s mine now I don’t have to buy her gifts,” he laughed. She was too busy anyway with their daughters to notice — and financially they were struggling. He made $4 to $12 a day on camel rides. He said he used to be a fisherman, like many of the men hawking camel rides by the sea. But he said enormous Pakistani trawlers had pushed out their small boats, and fished all the fish. “Even the littlest ones. Even the eggs.” “I skip one or two meals a day,” he said. When we asked what he thought of mullahs -as Pakistanis call them - the bearded religious clerics who offer shouty pronouncements in the name of Islam — wanting to ban Valentine’s Day, he frowned. "Oh please don’t think I’m one of them he said, patting his beard. I just grew this after marriage."
- On the oily, grey, garbage strewn section of Karachi beach where the city's residents come to splash in the Arabian Sea, we met Shuaib Nawaz, a camel driver. Before he married his childhood sweetheart four years ago, he always bought her Valentine's Day gifts: a small statue of a boy and a girl; a card, a bouquet of flowers. Now they are married with two daughters. “She’s mine now I don’t have to buy her gifts,” he laughed. She was too busy anyway with their daughters to notice — and financially they were struggling. He made $4 to $12 a day on camel rides. He said he used to be a fisherman, like many of the men hawking camel rides by the sea. But he said enormous Pakistani trawlers had pushed out their small boats, and fished all the fish. “Even the littlest ones. Even the eggs.” “I skip one or two meals a day,” he said. When we asked what he thought of mullahs -as Pakistanis call them - the bearded religious clerics who offer shouty pronouncements in the name of Islam — wanting to ban Valentine’s Day, he frowned. "Oh please don’t think I’m one of them he said, patting his beard. I just grew this after marriage."
- On the oily, grey, garbage strewn section of Karachi beach where the city's residents come to splash in the Arabian Sea, we met Shuaib Nawaz, a camel driver. Before he married his childhood sweetheart four years ago, he always bought her Valentine's Day gifts: a small statue of a boy and a girl; a card, a bouquet of flowers. Now they are married with two daughters. “She’s mine now I don’t have to buy her gifts,” he laughed. She was too busy anyway with their daughters to notice — and financially they were struggling. He made $4 to $12 a day on camel rides. He said he used to be a fisherman, like many of the men hawking camel rides by the sea. But he said enormous Pakistani trawlers had pushed out their small boats, and fished all the fish. “Even the littlest ones. Even the eggs.” “I skip one or two meals a day,” he said. When we asked what he thought of mullahs -as Pakistanis call them - the bearded religious clerics who offer shouty pronouncements in the name of Islam — wanting to ban Valentine’s Day, he frowned. "Oh please don’t think I’m one of them he said, patting his beard. I just grew this after marriage."
- I wrote about my cat’s adventure from a kibbutz to Islamabad, changing him from a Palestinian with Israeli papers to a Thai cat heading to Bangkok. The link is in the bio - Also, now back to real stories, like Syria. “Don't worry. We are experts in taking animals to enemy countries," he said in a thick Israeli accent. I imagined an aged Mossad operative. “We just took a dog to Iran," he said. https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2018/02/10/583366242/how-i-moved-my-cat-from-israel-to-pakistan?sc=17&f
- I wrote about my cat’s adventure from a kibbutz to Islamabad, changing him from a Palestinian with Israeli papers to a Thai cat heading to Bangkok. The link is in the bio - Also, now back to real stories, like Syria. “Don't worry. We are experts in taking animals to enemy countries," he said in a thick Israeli accent. I imagined an aged Mossad operative. “We just took a dog to Iran," he said. https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2018/02/10/583366242/how-i-moved-my-cat-from-israel-to-pakistan?sc=17&f
- I wrote about my cat’s adventure from a kibbutz to Islamabad, changing him from a Palestinian with Israeli papers to a Thai cat heading to Bangkok. The link is in the bio - Also, now back to real stories, like Syria. “Don't worry. We are experts in taking animals to enemy countries," he said in a thick Israeli accent. I imagined an aged Mossad operative. “We just took a dog to Iran," he said. https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2018/02/10/583366242/how-i-moved-my-cat-from-israel-to-pakistan?sc=17&f
- Pakistani transgender women put on makeup in a deira - a kind of communal flat they traditionally share. Pakistan’s ancient transgender community are known as “khawaja sira.” They have a more fluid, ambiguous gender identity than what Westerners are used to. For decades, they were pushed to the margins and derided. But in recent years they have pushed back, hard. now a bill that would enshrine their equality and outlaw discrimination is working its way through Pakistan’s parliament. The bill isn’t perfect, but it’s an important start - and an example to other Muslim majority countries. You can hear and read my story here: https://www.npr.org/2018/01/01/574932166/transgender-women-in-pakistan-demand-equal-rights
- Pakistani transgender women put on makeup in a deira - a kind of communal flat they traditionally share. Pakistan’s ancient transgender community are known as “khawaja sira.” They have a more fluid, ambiguous gender identity than what Westerners are used to. For decades, they were pushed to the margins and derided. But in recent years they have pushed back, hard. now a bill that would enshrine their equality and outlaw discrimination is working its way through Pakistan’s parliament. The bill isn’t perfect, but it’s an important start - and an example to other Muslim majority countries. You can hear and read my story here: https://www.npr.org/2018/01/01/574932166/transgender-women-in-pakistan-demand-equal-rights
- Pakistani transgender women put on makeup in a deira - a kind of communal flat they traditionally share. Pakistan’s ancient transgender community are known as “khawaja sira.” They have a more fluid, ambiguous gender identity than what Westerners are used to. For decades, they were pushed to the margins and derided. But in recent years they have pushed back, hard. now a bill that would enshrine their equality and outlaw discrimination is working its way through Pakistan’s parliament. The bill isn’t perfect, but it’s an important start - and an example to other Muslim majority countries. You can hear and read my story here: https://www.npr.org/2018/01/01/574932166/transgender-women-in-pakistan-demand-equal-rights
- "Ghalib: The Man, The Times." One of the Urdu language's greatest poets, a Deliwallah, an aristocrat whose fortunes sunk with the Mughal Empire, and who tried, deftly, to navigate his way among his new rulers. And Ghalib, what a poet: forging out of a new language a powerful voice. He rejects doctrinal faith, calls to love, mocks his contemporaries, etches out verses on paying his wine debts by selling his wine carafes, and promises you that the only point of life is to experience it. And then he dies, broken, sick and a pauper. Now I suspect, he would be an orphan to the angry religious nationalists of India and Pakistan. I'm so glad I came to Islamabad, if only for this.
- "Ghalib: The Man, The Times." One of the Urdu language's greatest poets, a Deliwallah, an aristocrat whose fortunes sunk with the Mughal Empire, and who tried, deftly, to navigate his way among his new rulers. And Ghalib, what a poet: forging out of a new language a powerful voice. He rejects doctrinal faith, calls to love, mocks his contemporaries, etches out verses on paying his wine debts by selling his wine carafes, and promises you that the only point of life is to experience it. And then he dies, broken, sick and a pauper. Now I suspect, he would be an orphan to the angry religious nationalists of India and Pakistan. I'm so glad I came to Islamabad, if only for this.
- "Ghalib: The Man, The Times." One of the Urdu language's greatest poets, a Deliwallah, an aristocrat whose fortunes sunk with the Mughal Empire, and who tried, deftly, to navigate his way among his new rulers. And Ghalib, what a poet: forging out of a new language a powerful voice. He rejects doctrinal faith, calls to love, mocks his contemporaries, etches out verses on paying his wine debts by selling his wine carafes, and promises you that the only point of life is to experience it. And then he dies, broken, sick and a pauper. Now I suspect, he would be an orphan to the angry religious nationalists of India and Pakistan. I'm so glad I came to Islamabad, if only for this.
- The four daughters of Shafia, a 32-year-old woman who lived next door a man accused of raping and killing at least 6 children in this provincial town. A few months ago, Shafia stopped letting her children play outside - after she saw the accused standing across their alleyway, gesturing at school girls to come with him. A teacher at the school also asked Shafia to tell the accused to stop standing on the roof of their apartment building -- from there, the teacher said, he was staring at the girls. Read and listen to our story from Kasur, a broken town. The link is in my bio.
- The four daughters of Shafia, a 32-year-old woman who lived next door a man accused of raping and killing at least 6 children in this provincial town. A few months ago, Shafia stopped letting her children play outside - after she saw the accused standing across their alleyway, gesturing at school girls to come with him. A teacher at the school also asked Shafia to tell the accused to stop standing on the roof of their apartment building -- from there, the teacher said, he was staring at the girls. Read and listen to our story from Kasur, a broken town. The link is in my bio.
- The four daughters of Shafia, a 32-year-old woman who lived next door a man accused of raping and killing at least 6 children in this provincial town. A few months ago, Shafia stopped letting her children play outside - after she saw the accused standing across their alleyway, gesturing at school girls to come with him. A teacher at the school also asked Shafia to tell the accused to stop standing on the roof of their apartment building -- from there, the teacher said, he was staring at the girls. Read and listen to our story from Kasur, a broken town. The link is in my bio.

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