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- The new paintings of former president Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama, attracted big crowds to the National Portrait Gallery last week, where thousands of visitors lined up for hours to see the works and snap pictures in front of them. The portraits attracted international attention when they were unveiled Feb. 12, and the enthusiasm continued during the first week they were on view to the public. More than 72,100 visitors — including 50,000 during the long Presidents’ Day weekend — entered the museum during the first week, officials said. Those numbers are more than three times greater than last year’s holiday weekend, which attracted just over 16 thousand visitors. Photo by @vanhoutenphoto/@washingtonpost
- The new paintings of former president Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama, attracted big crowds to the National Portrait Gallery last week, where thousands of visitors lined up for hours to see the works and snap pictures in front of them. The portraits attracted international attention when they were unveiled Feb. 12, and the enthusiasm continued during the first week they were on view to the public. More than 72,100 visitors — including 50,000 during the long Presidents’ Day weekend — entered the museum during the first week, officials said. Those numbers are more than three times greater than last year’s holiday weekend, which attracted just over 16 thousand visitors. Photo by @vanhoutenphoto/@washingtonpost
- The new paintings of former president Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama, attracted big crowds to the National Portrait Gallery last week, where thousands of visitors lined up for hours to see the works and snap pictures in front of them. The portraits attracted international attention when they were unveiled Feb. 12, and the enthusiasm continued during the first week they were on view to the public. More than 72,100 visitors — including 50,000 during the long Presidents’ Day weekend — entered the museum during the first week, officials said. Those numbers are more than three times greater than last year’s holiday weekend, which attracted just over 16 thousand visitors. Photo by @vanhoutenphoto/@washingtonpost
- One of the largest and most popular groups on the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School campus, the Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (JROTC) lost three members during Wednesday's tragic mass shooting that took the lives of 17 in total. Member Peter Wang, 15, was killed putting himself at risk, holding a door open so that others might survive. Peter’s sacrifice was, as current members put it, an example of the “selfless service” JROTC embraces. “That’s the biggest act of kindness he could ever do,” said Cadet Capt. Angelyse Perez (right), an 18-year-old senior and the Bravo Company commander. Alaina Petty, 14, and Martin Duque, 14, other members of the group, were also shot and killed in the rampage. In the days since the shooting, Angelyse and Cadet Capt. Madison Geller (left), wanted to get together with family to try to understand what happened and to seek comfort from one another. And when they say family, they mean more than just parents and siblings. Angelyse and Madison — best friends, constant confidantes — wanted to get their JROTC battalion together to help process the tragedy as best they could. Read more on washingtonpost.com. Photo by @mattmcclainphoto—The Washington Post
- One of the largest and most popular groups on the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School campus, the Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (JROTC) lost three members during Wednesday's tragic mass shooting that took the lives of 17 in total. Member Peter Wang, 15, was killed putting himself at risk, holding a door open so that others might survive. Peter’s sacrifice was, as current members put it, an example of the “selfless service” JROTC embraces. “That’s the biggest act of kindness he could ever do,” said Cadet Capt. Angelyse Perez (right), an 18-year-old senior and the Bravo Company commander. Alaina Petty, 14, and Martin Duque, 14, other members of the group, were also shot and killed in the rampage. In the days since the shooting, Angelyse and Cadet Capt. Madison Geller (left), wanted to get together with family to try to understand what happened and to seek comfort from one another. And when they say family, they mean more than just parents and siblings. Angelyse and Madison — best friends, constant confidantes — wanted to get their JROTC battalion together to help process the tragedy as best they could. Read more on washingtonpost.com. Photo by @mattmcclainphoto—The Washington Post
- One of the largest and most popular groups on the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School campus, the Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (JROTC) lost three members during Wednesday's tragic mass shooting that took the lives of 17 in total. Member Peter Wang, 15, was killed putting himself at risk, holding a door open so that others might survive. Peter’s sacrifice was, as current members put it, an example of the “selfless service” JROTC embraces. “That’s the biggest act of kindness he could ever do,” said Cadet Capt. Angelyse Perez (right), an 18-year-old senior and the Bravo Company commander. Alaina Petty, 14, and Martin Duque, 14, other members of the group, were also shot and killed in the rampage. In the days since the shooting, Angelyse and Cadet Capt. Madison Geller (left), wanted to get together with family to try to understand what happened and to seek comfort from one another. And when they say family, they mean more than just parents and siblings. Angelyse and Madison — best friends, constant confidantes — wanted to get their JROTC battalion together to help process the tragedy as best they could. Read more on washingtonpost.com. Photo by @mattmcclainphoto—The Washington Post
- Fact Check: "Forty percent of the guns in this country are sold without any background checks," Sen. Bernie Sanders said Sunday. This number comes from a study that's two decades old and looked at person to person sales, not all gun sales. The 40 percent statistic was based on one relatively small survey of 251 people about guns they obtained in 1993 and 1994, even though the law mandating background checks only went into effect in early 1994. The most recent research, a survey published in 2017 (based off gun owners who obtained a firearm in the past two years), indicates that 13 percent of guns — not 40 percent — are purchased without a background check. So, no matter how you look at it, Sen. Sanders' claim is just plain wrong. Our Fact Checker team gives him four Pinocchios: 🤥🤥🤥🤥
- Fact Check: "Forty percent of the guns in this country are sold without any background checks," Sen. Bernie Sanders said Sunday. This number comes from a study that's two decades old and looked at person to person sales, not all gun sales. The 40 percent statistic was based on one relatively small survey of 251 people about guns they obtained in 1993 and 1994, even though the law mandating background checks only went into effect in early 1994. The most recent research, a survey published in 2017 (based off gun owners who obtained a firearm in the past two years), indicates that 13 percent of guns — not 40 percent — are purchased without a background check. So, no matter how you look at it, Sen. Sanders' claim is just plain wrong. Our Fact Checker team gives him four Pinocchios: 🤥🤥🤥🤥
- Fact Check: "Forty percent of the guns in this country are sold without any background checks," Sen. Bernie Sanders said Sunday. This number comes from a study that's two decades old and looked at person to person sales, not all gun sales. The 40 percent statistic was based on one relatively small survey of 251 people about guns they obtained in 1993 and 1994, even though the law mandating background checks only went into effect in early 1994. The most recent research, a survey published in 2017 (based off gun owners who obtained a firearm in the past two years), indicates that 13 percent of guns — not 40 percent — are purchased without a background check. So, no matter how you look at it, Sen. Sanders' claim is just plain wrong. Our Fact Checker team gives him four Pinocchios: 🤥🤥🤥🤥
- "Kids in Flint always see themselves portrayed in the media as victims. Black Panther gives Flint kids a chance to see themselves represented on the big screen as royalty and heroes," 10-year-old Flint resident Mari Copeny (third from left) told The Flint Journal-MLive.com. Copeny raised $16,000 through GoFundMe to provide free tickets to 150 kids for a screening of the film on Monday. "Representation across all forms of media is important, especially in media that children consume," Copeny said. "You can be your own hero. You can be a superhero, but ultimately you're your own hero. Black Panther teaches us that we can be whoever you want to be. And that especially goes for Flint kids." Copeny also gave away $2,000 in Black Panther toys and comic books at the screening. Photo by Jake May /The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP
- "Kids in Flint always see themselves portrayed in the media as victims. Black Panther gives Flint kids a chance to see themselves represented on the big screen as royalty and heroes," 10-year-old Flint resident Mari Copeny (third from left) told The Flint Journal-MLive.com. Copeny raised $16,000 through GoFundMe to provide free tickets to 150 kids for a screening of the film on Monday. "Representation across all forms of media is important, especially in media that children consume," Copeny said. "You can be your own hero. You can be a superhero, but ultimately you're your own hero. Black Panther teaches us that we can be whoever you want to be. And that especially goes for Flint kids." Copeny also gave away $2,000 in Black Panther toys and comic books at the screening. Photo by Jake May /The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP
- "Kids in Flint always see themselves portrayed in the media as victims. Black Panther gives Flint kids a chance to see themselves represented on the big screen as royalty and heroes," 10-year-old Flint resident Mari Copeny (third from left) told The Flint Journal-MLive.com. Copeny raised $16,000 through GoFundMe to provide free tickets to 150 kids for a screening of the film on Monday. "Representation across all forms of media is important, especially in media that children consume," Copeny said. "You can be your own hero. You can be a superhero, but ultimately you're your own hero. Black Panther teaches us that we can be whoever you want to be. And that especially goes for Flint kids." Copeny also gave away $2,000 in Black Panther toys and comic books at the screening. Photo by Jake May /The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP
- Rachel Crooks, one of the 19 women who have accused Donald Trump of sexual misconduct, has told her story many times. But despite her story, and the similar stories of others, nothing has changed. For several years she had barely told anybody about Trump, because she assumed nothing would come of her story. But after coming forward during the 2016 presidential campaign, she has spent 18 months repeating it and proving herself right. In early February, Crooks, 35, launched a campaign to become a Democratic state representative in Ohio, in part so she could share her story more widely with voters across the state. And yet, after dozens of retellings, she still asks herself: Did people really care? Did it matter at all? Read more through the link in our bio. Photo by @vanhoutenphoto
- Rachel Crooks, one of the 19 women who have accused Donald Trump of sexual misconduct, has told her story many times. But despite her story, and the similar stories of others, nothing has changed. For several years she had barely told anybody about Trump, because she assumed nothing would come of her story. But after coming forward during the 2016 presidential campaign, she has spent 18 months repeating it and proving herself right. In early February, Crooks, 35, launched a campaign to become a Democratic state representative in Ohio, in part so she could share her story more widely with voters across the state. And yet, after dozens of retellings, she still asks herself: Did people really care? Did it matter at all? Read more through the link in our bio. Photo by @vanhoutenphoto
- Rachel Crooks, one of the 19 women who have accused Donald Trump of sexual misconduct, has told her story many times. But despite her story, and the similar stories of others, nothing has changed. For several years she had barely told anybody about Trump, because she assumed nothing would come of her story. But after coming forward during the 2016 presidential campaign, she has spent 18 months repeating it and proving herself right. In early February, Crooks, 35, launched a campaign to become a Democratic state representative in Ohio, in part so she could share her story more widely with voters across the state. And yet, after dozens of retellings, she still asks herself: Did people really care? Did it matter at all? Read more through the link in our bio. Photo by @vanhoutenphoto
- Five days after Zimbabwean opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai died following a battle with cancer, thousands of mourners gathered on Monday in Harare to pay tribute. Tsvangirai rose to prominence after founding the country's largest opposition party, the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) and becoming a nemesis to former president of Zimbabwe Robert Mugabe. He was a symbol of resistance to the ruling party’s authoritarianism, which has been entrenched since Zimbabwe broke away from Britain in 1980. Tsvangirai’s death comes during a critical transition in Zimbabwe’s national politics. It was only a few of months ago that Mugabe left the presidency after nearly 40 years of ruling the country. Photos by Jekesai Njikizana—@afpphoto; Philimon Bulawayo—@reuters
- Five days after Zimbabwean opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai died following a battle with cancer, thousands of mourners gathered on Monday in Harare to pay tribute. Tsvangirai rose to prominence after founding the country's largest opposition party, the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) and becoming a nemesis to former president of Zimbabwe Robert Mugabe. He was a symbol of resistance to the ruling party’s authoritarianism, which has been entrenched since Zimbabwe broke away from Britain in 1980. Tsvangirai’s death comes during a critical transition in Zimbabwe’s national politics. It was only a few of months ago that Mugabe left the presidency after nearly 40 years of ruling the country. Photos by Jekesai Njikizana—@afpphoto; Philimon Bulawayo—@reuters
- Five days after Zimbabwean opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai died following a battle with cancer, thousands of mourners gathered on Monday in Harare to pay tribute. Tsvangirai rose to prominence after founding the country's largest opposition party, the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) and becoming a nemesis to former president of Zimbabwe Robert Mugabe. He was a symbol of resistance to the ruling party’s authoritarianism, which has been entrenched since Zimbabwe broke away from Britain in 1980. Tsvangirai’s death comes during a critical transition in Zimbabwe’s national politics. It was only a few of months ago that Mugabe left the presidency after nearly 40 years of ruling the country. Photos by Jekesai Njikizana—@afpphoto; Philimon Bulawayo—@reuters
- In Parkland, Fla., an affluent city of gated communities, private golf courses and top-notch schools, residents are struggling to cope with the American tragedy of mass shootings. As in small communities before them, including Newtown, Conn., and Sutherland Springs, Texas, virtually everyone in Parkland knows someone who was killed. They are mourning together like family, with processions that clog streets and services that overflow hotel event rooms. But they are also fighting back: the city's teenagers have emerged since the shootings as a fearless and powerful voice calling for stricter gun laws. In a round of national television appearances on Sunday, survivors of the shooting, propelled by their haunting experience, announced the creation of “March For Our Lives” — what they hope will be a huge demonstration in Washington on March 24. Their raging activism is also mixed with personal pain. At the same time that Parkland teens are trying to create a political force to challenge the National Rifle Association, they are juggling funeral and burial schedules day after day. In this photo taken by @mattmcclainphoto, Parkland residents embraced outside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Sunday.
- In Parkland, Fla., an affluent city of gated communities, private golf courses and top-notch schools, residents are struggling to cope with the American tragedy of mass shootings. As in small communities before them, including Newtown, Conn., and Sutherland Springs, Texas, virtually everyone in Parkland knows someone who was killed. They are mourning together like family, with processions that clog streets and services that overflow hotel event rooms. But they are also fighting back: the city's teenagers have emerged since the shootings as a fearless and powerful voice calling for stricter gun laws. In a round of national television appearances on Sunday, survivors of the shooting, propelled by their haunting experience, announced the creation of “March For Our Lives” — what they hope will be a huge demonstration in Washington on March 24. Their raging activism is also mixed with personal pain. At the same time that Parkland teens are trying to create a political force to challenge the National Rifle Association, they are juggling funeral and burial schedules day after day. In this photo taken by @mattmcclainphoto, Parkland residents embraced outside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Sunday.
- In Parkland, Fla., an affluent city of gated communities, private golf courses and top-notch schools, residents are struggling to cope with the American tragedy of mass shootings. As in small communities before them, including Newtown, Conn., and Sutherland Springs, Texas, virtually everyone in Parkland knows someone who was killed. They are mourning together like family, with processions that clog streets and services that overflow hotel event rooms. But they are also fighting back: the city's teenagers have emerged since the shootings as a fearless and powerful voice calling for stricter gun laws. In a round of national television appearances on Sunday, survivors of the shooting, propelled by their haunting experience, announced the creation of “March For Our Lives” — what they hope will be a huge demonstration in Washington on March 24. Their raging activism is also mixed with personal pain. At the same time that Parkland teens are trying to create a political force to challenge the National Rifle Association, they are juggling funeral and burial schedules day after day. In this photo taken by @mattmcclainphoto, Parkland residents embraced outside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Sunday.
- Since Friday, friends and family of the 17 people killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School have attended a succession of funerals for teachers and fellow classmates. “This is physically and emotionally the kind of marathon I never want anyone else to have to run,” said Ken Cutler, a city commissioner, following one of the funerals. “These are children who have never had death touch their lives." On Sunday, they memorialized geography teacher Scott Beigel and two 14-year-old students: Jaime Guttenberg, a freshman girl who loved dancing, and Alex Schachter, a freshman boy who played trombone in the school band. Both students had older siblings who survived the shooting. Hundreds of mourners, many of them parents and children holding hands, walked to the funerals through overflowing parking lots, past hearses and black funeral limos. So many people wanted to attend the services, that some were moved to a large function areas to accommodate everyone. In the photo above taken by @mattmcclainphoto, students and their family members joined hands outside the school on Sunday in Parkland.
- Since Friday, friends and family of the 17 people killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School have attended a succession of funerals for teachers and fellow classmates. “This is physically and emotionally the kind of marathon I never want anyone else to have to run,” said Ken Cutler, a city commissioner, following one of the funerals. “These are children who have never had death touch their lives." On Sunday, they memorialized geography teacher Scott Beigel and two 14-year-old students: Jaime Guttenberg, a freshman girl who loved dancing, and Alex Schachter, a freshman boy who played trombone in the school band. Both students had older siblings who survived the shooting. Hundreds of mourners, many of them parents and children holding hands, walked to the funerals through overflowing parking lots, past hearses and black funeral limos. So many people wanted to attend the services, that some were moved to a large function areas to accommodate everyone. In the photo above taken by @mattmcclainphoto, students and their family members joined hands outside the school on Sunday in Parkland.
- Since Friday, friends and family of the 17 people killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School have attended a succession of funerals for teachers and fellow classmates. “This is physically and emotionally the kind of marathon I never want anyone else to have to run,” said Ken Cutler, a city commissioner, following one of the funerals. “These are children who have never had death touch their lives." On Sunday, they memorialized geography teacher Scott Beigel and two 14-year-old students: Jaime Guttenberg, a freshman girl who loved dancing, and Alex Schachter, a freshman boy who played trombone in the school band. Both students had older siblings who survived the shooting. Hundreds of mourners, many of them parents and children holding hands, walked to the funerals through overflowing parking lots, past hearses and black funeral limos. So many people wanted to attend the services, that some were moved to a large function areas to accommodate everyone. In the photo above taken by @mattmcclainphoto, students and their family members joined hands outside the school on Sunday in Parkland.
- Students and teachers from Parkland, Fla. directed their grief and rage at Washington this weekend following Wednesday's mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that left 17 people from their community dead. "Students are dying. Children are dying," high school senior Tyra Hemans told the Post, holding posters that showed photos of friends and faculty who were killed. "My friend will never get to say 'I graduated high school,' he's never going to get a high school diploma. ... As president of the United States of America, how can you look at these fellow students and think ... OK, it's life, let's just move on."
- Students and teachers from Parkland, Fla. directed their grief and rage at Washington this weekend following Wednesday's mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that left 17 people from their community dead. "Students are dying. Children are dying," high school senior Tyra Hemans told the Post, holding posters that showed photos of friends and faculty who were killed. "My friend will never get to say 'I graduated high school,' he's never going to get a high school diploma. ... As president of the United States of America, how can you look at these fellow students and think ... OK, it's life, let's just move on."
- Students and teachers from Parkland, Fla. directed their grief and rage at Washington this weekend following Wednesday's mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that left 17 people from their community dead. "Students are dying. Children are dying," high school senior Tyra Hemans told the Post, holding posters that showed photos of friends and faculty who were killed. "My friend will never get to say 'I graduated high school,' he's never going to get a high school diploma. ... As president of the United States of America, how can you look at these fellow students and think ... OK, it's life, let's just move on."
- While surveying damage from an earthquake that killed no one, a government helicopter crashed in Mexico on Friday and killed at least 13 people. The accident horrified and angered people in Mexico, which had seemed to escape the worst after a 7.2-magnitude earthquake hit the state of Oaxaca earlier in the day. Unlike last year's deadly quake near Mexico City, this temblor caused little more than power outages and structural damage near the southern coast. The governor of Oaxaca and Mexico's new interior secretary had been assessing the damage from the air, and the crash occurred as the helicopter was preparing to land in a field after dark. In this photo by Jorge Luis Plata, relatives react during a funeral for those who were killed during the crash in Santiago Jamiltepec, Mexico. Photo via @reuters
- While surveying damage from an earthquake that killed no one, a government helicopter crashed in Mexico on Friday and killed at least 13 people. The accident horrified and angered people in Mexico, which had seemed to escape the worst after a 7.2-magnitude earthquake hit the state of Oaxaca earlier in the day. Unlike last year's deadly quake near Mexico City, this temblor caused little more than power outages and structural damage near the southern coast. The governor of Oaxaca and Mexico's new interior secretary had been assessing the damage from the air, and the crash occurred as the helicopter was preparing to land in a field after dark. In this photo by Jorge Luis Plata, relatives react during a funeral for those who were killed during the crash in Santiago Jamiltepec, Mexico. Photo via @reuters
- While surveying damage from an earthquake that killed no one, a government helicopter crashed in Mexico on Friday and killed at least 13 people. The accident horrified and angered people in Mexico, which had seemed to escape the worst after a 7.2-magnitude earthquake hit the state of Oaxaca earlier in the day. Unlike last year's deadly quake near Mexico City, this temblor caused little more than power outages and structural damage near the southern coast. The governor of Oaxaca and Mexico's new interior secretary had been assessing the damage from the air, and the crash occurred as the helicopter was preparing to land in a field after dark. In this photo by Jorge Luis Plata, relatives react during a funeral for those who were killed during the crash in Santiago Jamiltepec, Mexico. Photo via @reuters
- Among the people protesting for stricter gun control laws near Parkland, Fla. on Saturday were scores of students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, the site of Wednesday's tragic mass shooting. Teens spoke passionately during the rally, which was held in front of the federal courthouse in downtown Fort Lauderdale, pleading with lawmakers to change the nation’s gun laws. Some students angrily criticized politicians who take campaign contributions from the National Rifle Association, AP reports, and challenged them to stop taking money, leading the crowd in call-and-response chants. “They say a good guy with a gun stops a bad guy with a gun,” one student said, and the crowd chanted, “We call BS.” Photo by Jonathan Drake—@reuters
- Among the people protesting for stricter gun control laws near Parkland, Fla. on Saturday were scores of students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, the site of Wednesday's tragic mass shooting. Teens spoke passionately during the rally, which was held in front of the federal courthouse in downtown Fort Lauderdale, pleading with lawmakers to change the nation’s gun laws. Some students angrily criticized politicians who take campaign contributions from the National Rifle Association, AP reports, and challenged them to stop taking money, leading the crowd in call-and-response chants. “They say a good guy with a gun stops a bad guy with a gun,” one student said, and the crowd chanted, “We call BS.” Photo by Jonathan Drake—@reuters
- Among the people protesting for stricter gun control laws near Parkland, Fla. on Saturday were scores of students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, the site of Wednesday's tragic mass shooting. Teens spoke passionately during the rally, which was held in front of the federal courthouse in downtown Fort Lauderdale, pleading with lawmakers to change the nation’s gun laws. Some students angrily criticized politicians who take campaign contributions from the National Rifle Association, AP reports, and challenged them to stop taking money, leading the crowd in call-and-response chants. “They say a good guy with a gun stops a bad guy with a gun,” one student said, and the crowd chanted, “We call BS.” Photo by Jonathan Drake—@reuters
- One of the victims of Wednesday’s mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School was Aaron Feis, an assistant football coach and security guard. He was shot after throwing himself in front of students at the school in Parkland, Fla. The football team announced Feis’s death on Twitter Thursday, writing that he “died a hero” and “will forever be in our hearts and memories.” During a press conference earlier this week, Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel told reporters "the kids in this community loved him, they adored him. He was one of the greatest people I knew. ... I don't know the specifics yet ... but when Aaron Feis died, when he was killed ... he did it protecting others, you can guarantee that." Video via @reuters
- One of the victims of Wednesday’s mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School was Aaron Feis, an assistant football coach and security guard. He was shot after throwing himself in front of students at the school in Parkland, Fla. The football team announced Feis’s death on Twitter Thursday, writing that he “died a hero” and “will forever be in our hearts and memories.” During a press conference earlier this week, Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel told reporters "the kids in this community loved him, they adored him. He was one of the greatest people I knew. ... I don't know the specifics yet ... but when Aaron Feis died, when he was killed ... he did it protecting others, you can guarantee that." Video via @reuters
- One of the victims of Wednesday’s mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School was Aaron Feis, an assistant football coach and security guard. He was shot after throwing himself in front of students at the school in Parkland, Fla. The football team announced Feis’s death on Twitter Thursday, writing that he “died a hero” and “will forever be in our hearts and memories.” During a press conference earlier this week, Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel told reporters "the kids in this community loved him, they adored him. He was one of the greatest people I knew. ... I don't know the specifics yet ... but when Aaron Feis died, when he was killed ... he did it protecting others, you can guarantee that." Video via @reuters
- After falling out of medal contention and finally skating with a clear mind, 18-year-old Nathan Chen landed an unparalleled six quadruple jumps in a historic performance at the Pyeongchang Olympics. His personal-best score of 215.08 points Saturday was enough to win the free skate, and helped him move up to fifth place. Yuzuru Hanyu and Shoma Uno took the gold and the silver medals for Japan. This multiple exposure image of Chen was taken by Tatyana Zenkovich—Epa-Efe/Rex/Shutterstock
- After falling out of medal contention and finally skating with a clear mind, 18-year-old Nathan Chen landed an unparalleled six quadruple jumps in a historic performance at the Pyeongchang Olympics. His personal-best score of 215.08 points Saturday was enough to win the free skate, and helped him move up to fifth place. Yuzuru Hanyu and Shoma Uno took the gold and the silver medals for Japan. This multiple exposure image of Chen was taken by Tatyana Zenkovich—Epa-Efe/Rex/Shutterstock
- After falling out of medal contention and finally skating with a clear mind, 18-year-old Nathan Chen landed an unparalleled six quadruple jumps in a historic performance at the Pyeongchang Olympics. His personal-best score of 215.08 points Saturday was enough to win the free skate, and helped him move up to fifth place. Yuzuru Hanyu and Shoma Uno took the gold and the silver medals for Japan. This multiple exposure image of Chen was taken by Tatyana Zenkovich—Epa-Efe/Rex/Shutterstock
- Thirty-six minutes after the gold medal was won, the Olympics happened. • A Colombian, Tongan, Moroccan, Portuguese and Mexican were slowest in an Olympic ski race, but their hug at the finish was a winner. • The cross-country skiers from "the exotic countries" — the ones that don't get much snow — finished in 112th through 116th place and into and beautiful blob of a group hug. • The competitors are all friends, and some have even trained with each other. (Photos: Diego Azubel/Epa-Efe/Rex/Shutterstock; Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images)
- Thirty-six minutes after the gold medal was won, the Olympics happened. • A Colombian, Tongan, Moroccan, Portuguese and Mexican were slowest in an Olympic ski race, but their hug at the finish was a winner. • The cross-country skiers from "the exotic countries" — the ones that don't get much snow — finished in 112th through 116th place and into and beautiful blob of a group hug. • The competitors are all friends, and some have even trained with each other. (Photos: Diego Azubel/Epa-Efe/Rex/Shutterstock; Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images)
- Thirty-six minutes after the gold medal was won, the Olympics happened. • A Colombian, Tongan, Moroccan, Portuguese and Mexican were slowest in an Olympic ski race, but their hug at the finish was a winner. • The cross-country skiers from "the exotic countries" — the ones that don't get much snow — finished in 112th through 116th place and into and beautiful blob of a group hug. • The competitors are all friends, and some have even trained with each other. (Photos: Diego Azubel/Epa-Efe/Rex/Shutterstock; Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images)

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