Photos and video with hashtag #walterbenjamin

#walterbenjamin

  • 9.9K Photos
  • Small
  • Medium
  • Large
- “Uno ha de tener la suerte de que le lleguen las historias que le corresponde escribir. Las mejores no surgen en la imaginación, sino que vienen desde fuera y se presentan de manera objetiva, con la autoridad inapelable de lo que ya posee por sí mismo una forma perfecta. La gratitud es mucho más razonable que el orgullo cuando el fruto del talento depende en tal medida de un regalo del azar. (...) No hay historia más perfecta que la de la llegada de un desconocido a un espacio cerrado y para él lleno de enigmas, una ciudad, una casa, una isla. Quienes lo ven llegar averiguan o imaginan cosas certeras sobre él que él mismo no sabe”. AMM https://elpais.com/cultura/2017/12/11/babelia/1513009062_095765.html #antoniomunozmolina #antoniomuñozmolina #walterbenjamin #manolotriple #lecturasmanolotriple
- “Uno ha de tener la suerte de que le lleguen las historias que le corresponde escribir. Las mejores no surgen en la imaginación, sino que vienen desde fuera y se presentan de manera objetiva, con la autoridad inapelable de lo que ya posee por sí mismo una forma perfecta. La gratitud es mucho más razonable que el orgullo cuando el fruto del talento depende en tal medida de un regalo del azar. (...) No hay historia más perfecta que la de la llegada de un desconocido a un espacio cerrado y para él lleno de enigmas, una ciudad, una casa, una isla. Quienes lo ven llegar averiguan o imaginan cosas certeras sobre él que él mismo no sabe”. AMM https://elpais.com/cultura/2017/12/11/babelia/1513009062_095765.html #antoniomunozmolina #antoniomu ñozmolina #walterbenjamin #manolotriple #lecturasmanolotriple
- “Uno ha de tener la suerte de que le lleguen las historias que le corresponde escribir. Las mejores no surgen en la imaginación, sino que vienen desde fuera y se presentan de manera objetiva, con la autoridad inapelable de lo que ya posee por sí mismo una forma perfecta. La gratitud es mucho más razonable que el orgullo cuando el fruto del talento depende en tal medida de un regalo del azar. (...) No hay historia más perfecta que la de la llegada de un desconocido a un espacio cerrado y para él lleno de enigmas, una ciudad, una casa, una isla. Quienes lo ven llegar averiguan o imaginan cosas certeras sobre él que él mismo no sabe”. AMM https://elpais.com/cultura/2017/12/11/babelia/1513009062_095765.html #antoniomunozmolina #antoniomuñozmolina #walterbenjamin #manolotriple #lecturasmanolotriple
- “Masters” Collection, 2017, Jeff Koons for Louis Vuitton. Andy Warhol silk-screened and mass-produced the Mona Lisa, as a way of diminishing her iconic power. Much like the muscularity and permanence of his balloon dogs, Koons restores her preciousness by using her image on a highly desirable and valuable design object. He’s effectively made Walter Benjamin irrelevant, and in my opinion, that’s a good thing. There are at least five more artists coming in the series, most of them impressionists. #fashion #design #handbags #accessories #masterpieces #painting #arthistory #jeffkoons #pop #popart #neopop #andywarhol #monalisa #leonardodavinci #titian #fragonard #vangogh #rubens #impressionism #walterbenjamin #mechanicalreproduction #louisvuitton
- “Masters” Collection, 2017, Jeff Koons for Louis Vuitton. Andy Warhol silk-screened and mass-produced the Mona Lisa, as a way of diminishing her iconic power. Much like the muscularity and permanence of his balloon dogs, Koons restores her preciousness by using her image on a highly desirable and valuable design object. He’s effectively made Walter Benjamin irrelevant, and in my opinion, that’s a good thing. There are at least five more artists coming in the series, most of them impressionists. #fashion #design #handbags #accessories #masterpieces #painting #arthistory #jeffkoons #pop #popart #neopop #andywarhol #monalisa #leonardodavinci #titian #fragonard #vangogh #rubens #impressionism #walterbenjamin #mechanicalreproduction #louisvuitton
- “Masters” Collection, 2017, Jeff Koons for Louis Vuitton. Andy Warhol silk-screened and mass-produced the Mona Lisa, as a way of diminishing her iconic power. Much like the muscularity and permanence of his balloon dogs, Koons restores her preciousness by using her image on a highly desirable and valuable design object. He’s effectively made Walter Benjamin irrelevant, and in my opinion, that’s a good thing. There are at least five more artists coming in the series, most of them impressionists. #fashion #design #handbags #accessories #masterpieces #painting #arthistory #jeffkoons #pop #popart #neopop #andywarhol #monalisa #leonardodavinci #titian #fragonard #vangogh #rubens #impressionism #walterbenjamin #mechanicalreproduction #louisvuitton
- Reproducing images - She Gotta Have It (1986) remade as tv show 2017 #vizcult2017 #WalterBenjamin #Shesgottahaveit #reproduction #reproducibility #modernart #theCopy #theoriesofvisualreproduction #mechanicalreproduction This year, Spike Lee remade the 1986 movie “She’s Gotta Have It”, as a tv drama. This reproduction of a film as a series has been critiqued, and this debate of “which is better” is reflective of the issues of reproduction and “the copy”. In Practices of Looking, we learned that the valuing of the original, uncopied work has dominated the history of images perhaps because of the persistent presence and evolution of copying technology (190). Indeed, works of art have been regarded as unique and original objects, with meanings and values tied to its originality. However if we dig further, there is nothing new in art and every idea is appropriated in order to make new meanings in modern contexts. The story of She’s Gotta Have It, a tale about a pansexual polyamorous black woman, of course has different interpretations today than in 1986. In the 80s it may have been more controversial of a topic, and today, queer viewers critique how the main character, Nola is presented, rather than critiquing the subject matter. Viewers today also talk about the nature of the cinematography, which speaks to Walter Benjamin’s proposal that motion picture films hold no truly unique images. They are rather copies, each standing equally in the place of the original. Benjamin criticized the emphasis on the original for reifying the artwork as commodity in a capitalist system. Reproducibility is rather a revolutionary quality of art, because it frees it from the grip of old contexts, and allows for modern interpretations and critues. As a result, we have fresh new insights and meanings that reflect today’s public.
- Reproducing images - She Gotta Have It (1986) remade as tv show 2017 #vizcult2017 #WalterBenjamin #Shesgottahaveit #reproduction #reproducibility #modernart #theCopy #theoriesofvisualreproduction #mechanicalreproduction This year, Spike Lee remade the 1986 movie “She’s Gotta Have It”, as a tv drama. This reproduction of a film as a series has been critiqued, and this debate of “which is better” is reflective of the issues of reproduction and “the copy”. In Practices of Looking, we learned that the valuing of the original, uncopied work has dominated the history of images perhaps because of the persistent presence and evolution of copying technology (190). Indeed, works of art have been regarded as unique and original objects, with meanings and values tied to its originality. However if we dig further, there is nothing new in art and every idea is appropriated in order to make new meanings in modern contexts. The story of She’s Gotta Have It, a tale about a pansexual polyamorous black woman, of course has different interpretations today than in 1986. In the 80s it may have been more controversial of a topic, and today, queer viewers critique how the main character, Nola is presented, rather than critiquing the subject matter. Viewers today also talk about the nature of the cinematography, which speaks to Walter Benjamin’s proposal that motion picture films hold no truly unique images. They are rather copies, each standing equally in the place of the original. Benjamin criticized the emphasis on the original for reifying the artwork as commodity in a capitalist system. Reproducibility is rather a revolutionary quality of art, because it frees it from the grip of old contexts, and allows for modern interpretations and critues. As a result, we have fresh new insights and meanings that reflect today’s public.
- Reproducing images - She Gotta Have It (1986) remade as tv show 2017 #vizcult2017 #WalterBenjamin #Shesgottahaveit #reproduction #reproducibility #modernart #theCopy #theoriesofvisualreproduction #mechanicalreproduction This year, Spike Lee remade the 1986 movie “She’s Gotta Have It”, as a tv drama. This reproduction of a film as a series has been critiqued, and this debate of “which is better” is reflective of the issues of reproduction and “the copy”. In Practices of Looking, we learned that the valuing of the original, uncopied work has dominated the history of images perhaps because of the persistent presence and evolution of copying technology (190). Indeed, works of art have been regarded as unique and original objects, with meanings and values tied to its originality. However if we dig further, there is nothing new in art and every idea is appropriated in order to make new meanings in modern contexts. The story of She’s Gotta Have It, a tale about a pansexual polyamorous black woman, of course has different interpretations today than in 1986. In the 80s it may have been more controversial of a topic, and today, queer viewers critique how the main character, Nola is presented, rather than critiquing the subject matter. Viewers today also talk about the nature of the cinematography, which speaks to Walter Benjamin’s proposal that motion picture films hold no truly unique images. They are rather copies, each standing equally in the place of the original. Benjamin criticized the emphasis on the original for reifying the artwork as commodity in a capitalist system. Reproducibility is rather a revolutionary quality of art, because it frees it from the grip of old contexts, and allows for modern interpretations and critues. As a result, we have fresh new insights and meanings that reflect today’s public.
- First published in 1972 and based on the BBC television series of the same name, this book contains 7 essays on art and criticism created collectively by John Berger, Sven Blomberg, Chris Fox, Michael Dibb and Richard Hollis. Three of these essays are purely pictorial created to challenge the notion of what constitutes an essay: words or ideas? Can ideas be expressed only through a verbal essay? At some point, I am going to do an insta story on the pictorial essays to discuss these questions. The first essay is inspired by Walter Benjamin's iconic essay: The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. Interestingly, Ali Smith's new book Winter also delves into the idea of what art means in today's time and how the ways of seeing it are transforming. This thread of art-criticism-set notions-challenges to set notions-new ways of seeing-work of art today- Mona Lisa in selfies is one that is connecting John Berger- Walter Benjamin and Ali Smith for me. Super excited to write more on this. _ _ #johnberger #art #artcriticism #alismith #winter #monalisa #paintings #photography #walterbenjamin #scholarlife #thesiswriting #whatisart #howtoseeart #reading #bookstagram #books #booklover #bookaddict #booksofinstagram #booknerd #readeveryday #readeverywhere #writers #authors #quotes #writing #vscobooks
- First published in 1972 and based on the BBC television series of the same name, this book contains 7 essays on art and criticism created collectively by John Berger, Sven Blomberg, Chris Fox, Michael Dibb and Richard Hollis. Three of these essays are purely pictorial created to challenge the notion of what constitutes an essay: words or ideas? Can ideas be expressed only through a verbal essay? At some point, I am going to do an insta story on the pictorial essays to discuss these questions. The first essay is inspired by Walter Benjamin& #39;s iconic essay: The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. Interestingly, Ali Smith& #39;s new book Winter also delves into the idea of what art means in today& #39;s time and how the ways of seeing it are transforming. This thread of art-criticism-set notions-challenges to set notions-new ways of seeing-work of art today- Mona Lisa in selfies is one that is connecting John Berger- Walter Benjamin and Ali Smith for me. Super excited to write more on this. _ _ #johnberger #art #artcriticism #alismith #winter #monalisa #paintings #photography #walterbenjamin #scholarlife #thesiswriting #whatisart #howtoseeart #reading #bookstagram #books #booklover #bookaddict #booksofinstagram #booknerd #readeveryday #readeverywhere #writers #authors #quotes #writing #vscobooks
- First published in 1972 and based on the BBC television series of the same name, this book contains 7 essays on art and criticism created collectively by John Berger, Sven Blomberg, Chris Fox, Michael Dibb and Richard Hollis. Three of these essays are purely pictorial created to challenge the notion of what constitutes an essay: words or ideas? Can ideas be expressed only through a verbal essay? At some point, I am going to do an insta story on the pictorial essays to discuss these questions. The first essay is inspired by Walter Benjamin's iconic essay: The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. Interestingly, Ali Smith's new book Winter also delves into the idea of what art means in today's time and how the ways of seeing it are transforming. This thread of art-criticism-set notions-challenges to set notions-new ways of seeing-work of art today- Mona Lisa in selfies is one that is connecting John Berger- Walter Benjamin and Ali Smith for me. Super excited to write more on this. _ _ #johnberger #art #artcriticism #alismith #winter #monalisa #paintings #photography #walterbenjamin #scholarlife #thesiswriting #whatisart #howtoseeart #reading #bookstagram #books #booklover #bookaddict #booksofinstagram #booknerd #readeveryday #readeverywhere #writers #authors #quotes #writing #vscobooks
- Chapter 5: Visual Technologies, Reproduction, & the Copy #vizcult2017 #PracticesofLooking #reproduction #WalterBenjamin #MechanicalReproduction #remakes #sequels Walter Benjamin made some very interesting arguments both in support and against mechanical reproduction. I will be using his comments to reflect upon the recent movement of remakes and sequels within in the modern film industry. Reasons in which he supported the mechanical reproduction of arts, like feature films, were to give the access needed to those who could not see the original. Benjamin disapproved of the way that the importance of the original work was used to gain money and eventually used as a "commodity in a capitalist system". Of course, this support was birthed out of the early times of film, when it was still debated to send copies to multiple theaters. In our current artistic state, I believe that the way in which we enact mechanical reproduction is by creating 'remakes' and sequels. Original stories are replicated in attempt to spread the story to future generations and satisfy a sense of nostalgia of the original audience. The negativity in this modern reproduction lies in the capitalist behavior in the re-makers. Just as Benjamin did not like the capitalist efforts of those withholding the copy of film, the profit-driven mindset allows for filmmakers to disrupt the quality of the remake. The reproduction and copying of the story is no longer to preserve the art, which should be viewed by generations to come, but a way in which major media corporations acquire more assets. Despite this being the case in many instances, there are times in the copy/remake of a story turns out to withhold an aura of its own. In times of satisfying our need of nostalgia by remaking and remembering past films, it is important that we must avoid the temptation of making an easy profit but instead create its own "presence in time and space".
- Chapter 5: Visual Technologies, Reproduction, & the Copy #vizcult2017 #PracticesofLooking #reproduction #WalterBenjamin #MechanicalReproduction #remakes #sequels Walter Benjamin made some very interesting arguments both in support and against mechanical reproduction. I will be using his comments to reflect upon the recent movement of remakes and sequels within in the modern film industry. Reasons in which he supported the mechanical reproduction of arts, like feature films, were to give the access needed to those who could not see the original. Benjamin disapproved of the way that the importance of the original work was used to gain money and eventually used as a "commodity in a capitalist system". Of course, this support was birthed out of the early times of film, when it was still debated to send copies to multiple theaters. In our current artistic state, I believe that the way in which we enact mechanical reproduction is by creating & #39;remakes & #39; and sequels. Original stories are replicated in attempt to spread the story to future generations and satisfy a sense of nostalgia of the original audience. The negativity in this modern reproduction lies in the capitalist behavior in the re-makers. Just as Benjamin did not like the capitalist efforts of those withholding the copy of film, the profit-driven mindset allows for filmmakers to disrupt the quality of the remake. The reproduction and copying of the story is no longer to preserve the art, which should be viewed by generations to come, but a way in which major media corporations acquire more assets. Despite this being the case in many instances, there are times in the copy/remake of a story turns out to withhold an aura of its own. In times of satisfying our need of nostalgia by remaking and remembering past films, it is important that we must avoid the temptation of making an easy profit but instead create its own "presence in time and space".
- Chapter 5: Visual Technologies, Reproduction, & the Copy #vizcult2017 #PracticesofLooking #reproduction #WalterBenjamin #MechanicalReproduction #remakes #sequels Walter Benjamin made some very interesting arguments both in support and against mechanical reproduction. I will be using his comments to reflect upon the recent movement of remakes and sequels within in the modern film industry. Reasons in which he supported the mechanical reproduction of arts, like feature films, were to give the access needed to those who could not see the original. Benjamin disapproved of the way that the importance of the original work was used to gain money and eventually used as a "commodity in a capitalist system". Of course, this support was birthed out of the early times of film, when it was still debated to send copies to multiple theaters. In our current artistic state, I believe that the way in which we enact mechanical reproduction is by creating 'remakes' and sequels. Original stories are replicated in attempt to spread the story to future generations and satisfy a sense of nostalgia of the original audience. The negativity in this modern reproduction lies in the capitalist behavior in the re-makers. Just as Benjamin did not like the capitalist efforts of those withholding the copy of film, the profit-driven mindset allows for filmmakers to disrupt the quality of the remake. The reproduction and copying of the story is no longer to preserve the art, which should be viewed by generations to come, but a way in which major media corporations acquire more assets. Despite this being the case in many instances, there are times in the copy/remake of a story turns out to withhold an aura of its own. In times of satisfying our need of nostalgia by remaking and remembering past films, it is important that we must avoid the temptation of making an easy profit but instead create its own "presence in time and space".

This product uses the Instagram API but is not endorsed or certified by Instagram. All Instagram™ logos and trademarks displayed on this application are property of Instagram.