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Photos and video with hashtag #theacropolismuseum

#theacropolismuseum

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- I think that’s my first @tripadvisor review ever #reposted 😁🤪 I love @pointarestaurant - can’t hide it. It’s a superb #rooftop #bar & #restaurant, with fine and #imaginative #Greek #cuisine, great #cocktails, excellent #service, and #breathtaking #views to the #Acropolis and the #theacropolismuseum As I very often say to friends: “Point a Bar and Restaurant is Greece at its finest!” [“Το Point a Bar and Restaurant είναι Ελλάδα που μας αξίζει να έχουμε!”]. It’s my #favorite place to be during late #spring - early #autumn! Can’t wait until its opening, in May! 💕 #pointa #pointarestaurant
- I think that’s my first @tripadvisor review ever #reposted 😁🤪 I love @pointarestaurant - can’t hide it. It’s a superb #rooftop #bar & #restaurant , with fine and #imaginative #Greek #cuisine , great #cocktails , excellent #service , and #breathtaking #views to the #Acropolis and the #theacropolismuseum As I very often say to friends: “Point a Bar and Restaurant is Greece at its finest!” [“Το Point a Bar and Restaurant είναι Ελλάδα που μας αξίζει να έχουμε!”]. It’s my #favorite place to be during late #spring - early #autumn ! Can’t wait until its opening, in May! 💕 #pointa #pointarestaurant
- I think that’s my first @tripadvisor review ever #reposted 😁🤪 I love @pointarestaurant - can’t hide it. It’s a superb #rooftop #bar & #restaurant, with fine and #imaginative #Greek #cuisine, great #cocktails, excellent #service, and #breathtaking #views to the #Acropolis and the #theacropolismuseum As I very often say to friends: “Point a Bar and Restaurant is Greece at its finest!” [“Το Point a Bar and Restaurant είναι Ελλάδα που μας αξίζει να έχουμε!”]. It’s my #favorite place to be during late #spring - early #autumn! Can’t wait until its opening, in May! 💕 #pointa #pointarestaurant
- As visitors climb the stairs of Athens's splendid, new Acropolis Museum (designed by Bernard Tschumi) they pass – often unaware – under the stony gaze of the Caryatids, relocated from their high perch on the Acropolis. Originally, they served as the supports of the southern portico of the Erechtheion (c. 421–406 BC), the most sacred site of ancient Athens, which housed (amongst other things) the cult figure of the city's patron goddess Athena and the olive tree she gifted the city. The significance of these mighty, female figures, whose bodies served as architectural columns and their heads held the capitals that supported the porch's architrave, is unknown. Like other much-smaller "korai" (maiden) figures in the museum, these too represent libation bearers, and their name derives from the young women of Caryae, followers of the hunting goddess Artemis, who danced with baskets of plants on their heads. Each of these six figures is unique; their bodies and faces are those of six different women. It should be noted that one was taken by the 7th Earl of Elgin in 1801 and is now housed in London's British Museum, while another was badly damaged by Turkish cannon fire in 1827 during the Greek War of Independence. With their arms missing, these figures seem now more to guard than to offer. The plaits of their thick hair (which architecturally add support to their necks) cascade down their backs. Their majestic beauty is heightened by their apparent motion though they are carved in marble. Unlike their static archaic female counterparts, the colossal Caryatids appear to push forward, as their knees press against the skirted folds of their "peplos", clinging to their muscular form, as they seem to take a first, effortless step. With grace and poise, unburdened by the weight resting on their heads they seem to move, stoically forward. Towards an unknown future, sacrifice, eternity? Moving and yet un-moved, these enigmatic figures move me to tears. The warm color of the stone, a texture as if flesh and cloth, the force of their step, a first step that is almost 2.5 millennia old. @theacropolismuseum #theacropolismuseum #caryatids #athens #ancientgreece
- As visitors climb the stairs of Athens& #39;s splendid, new Acropolis Museum (designed by Bernard Tschumi) they pass – often unaware – under the stony gaze of the Caryatids, relocated from their high perch on the Acropolis. Originally, they served as the supports of the southern portico of the Erechtheion (c. 421–406 BC), the most sacred site of ancient Athens, which housed (amongst other things) the cult figure of the city& #39;s patron goddess Athena and the olive tree she gifted the city. The significance of these mighty, female figures, whose bodies served as architectural columns and their heads held the capitals that supported the porch& #39;s architrave, is unknown. Like other much-smaller "korai" (maiden) figures in the museum, these too represent libation bearers, and their name derives from the young women of Caryae, followers of the hunting goddess Artemis, who danced with baskets of plants on their heads. Each of these six figures is unique; their bodies and faces are those of six different women. It should be noted that one was taken by the 7th Earl of Elgin in 1801 and is now housed in London& #39;s British Museum, while another was badly damaged by Turkish cannon fire in 1827 during the Greek War of Independence. With their arms missing, these figures seem now more to guard than to offer. The plaits of their thick hair (which architecturally add support to their necks) cascade down their backs. Their majestic beauty is heightened by their apparent motion though they are carved in marble. Unlike their static archaic female counterparts, the colossal Caryatids appear to push forward, as their knees press against the skirted folds of their "peplos", clinging to their muscular form, as they seem to take a first, effortless step. With grace and poise, unburdened by the weight resting on their heads they seem to move, stoically forward. Towards an unknown future, sacrifice, eternity? Moving and yet un-moved, these enigmatic figures move me to tears. The warm color of the stone, a texture as if flesh and cloth, the force of their step, a first step that is almost 2.5 millennia old. @theacropolismuseum #theacropolismuseum #caryatids #athens #ancientgreece
- As visitors climb the stairs of Athens's splendid, new Acropolis Museum (designed by Bernard Tschumi) they pass – often unaware – under the stony gaze of the Caryatids, relocated from their high perch on the Acropolis. Originally, they served as the supports of the southern portico of the Erechtheion (c. 421–406 BC), the most sacred site of ancient Athens, which housed (amongst other things) the cult figure of the city's patron goddess Athena and the olive tree she gifted the city. The significance of these mighty, female figures, whose bodies served as architectural columns and their heads held the capitals that supported the porch's architrave, is unknown. Like other much-smaller "korai" (maiden) figures in the museum, these too represent libation bearers, and their name derives from the young women of Caryae, followers of the hunting goddess Artemis, who danced with baskets of plants on their heads. Each of these six figures is unique; their bodies and faces are those of six different women. It should be noted that one was taken by the 7th Earl of Elgin in 1801 and is now housed in London's British Museum, while another was badly damaged by Turkish cannon fire in 1827 during the Greek War of Independence. With their arms missing, these figures seem now more to guard than to offer. The plaits of their thick hair (which architecturally add support to their necks) cascade down their backs. Their majestic beauty is heightened by their apparent motion though they are carved in marble. Unlike their static archaic female counterparts, the colossal Caryatids appear to push forward, as their knees press against the skirted folds of their "peplos", clinging to their muscular form, as they seem to take a first, effortless step. With grace and poise, unburdened by the weight resting on their heads they seem to move, stoically forward. Towards an unknown future, sacrifice, eternity? Moving and yet un-moved, these enigmatic figures move me to tears. The warm color of the stone, a texture as if flesh and cloth, the force of their step, a first step that is almost 2.5 millennia old. @theacropolismuseum #theacropolismuseum #caryatids #athens #ancientgreece
- This is what the inside of the 8th best museum in the world looks like! The Acropolis Museum recently got its ranking by TripAdvisor. Follow our #WanderlustGR journey and pay a virtual visit to all the other museums we visited today in #Athens! 🏛 #WanderlustGR @stef_greece • • Ήξερες οτι το Μουσείο της Ακρόπολης ψηφίστηκε το 8ο καλύτερο μουσείο του κόσμου απο το TripAdvisor; Ανακάλυψέ το μαζί με ολα τα υπόλοιπα μουσεία που επισκεφθήκαμε στο σημερινό #WanderlustGR επεισόδιό μας! 😉
- This is what the inside of the 8th best museum in the world looks like! The Acropolis Museum recently got its ranking by TripAdvisor. Follow our #WanderlustGR journey and pay a virtual visit to all the other museums we visited today in #Athens ! 🏛 #WanderlustGR @stef_greece • • Ήξερες οτι το Μουσείο της Ακρόπολης ψηφίστηκε το 8ο καλύτερο μουσείο του κόσμου απο το TripAdvisor; Ανακάλυψέ το μαζί με ολα τα υπόλοιπα μουσεία που επισκεφθήκαμε στο σημερινό #WanderlustGR επεισόδιό μας! 😉
- This is what the inside of the 8th best museum in the world looks like! The Acropolis Museum recently got its ranking by TripAdvisor. Follow our #WanderlustGR journey and pay a virtual visit to all the other museums we visited today in #Athens! 🏛 #WanderlustGR @stef_greece • • Ήξερες οτι το Μουσείο της Ακρόπολης ψηφίστηκε το 8ο καλύτερο μουσείο του κόσμου απο το TripAdvisor; Ανακάλυψέ το μαζί με ολα τα υπόλοιπα μουσεία που επισκεφθήκαμε στο σημερινό #WanderlustGR επεισόδιό μας! 😉

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