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- After Stieglitz died in 1946, #GeorgiaOKeeffe moved permanently to rural New Mexico, acquiring two conventional adobe structures for her homes. In her art, she drew upon the new motifs and colors of her adopted landscape, but painted them in her distinctive style of bold colors and abstract forms. In a 1942 letter to the painter Arthur Dove she wrote, "I wish you could see what I see out the window—the earth pink and yellow cliffs to the north—the full pale moon about to go down in an early morning lavender sky... pink and purple hills in front and the scrubby fine dull green cedars—and a feeling of much space—It is a very beautiful world." #okeeffemodern ⠀ ⠀
- After Stieglitz died in 1946, #GeorgiaOKeeffe moved permanently to rural New Mexico, acquiring two conventional adobe structures for her homes. In her art, she drew upon the new motifs and colors of her adopted landscape, but painted them in her distinctive style of bold colors and abstract forms. In a 1942 letter to the painter Arthur Dove she wrote, "I wish you could see what I see out the window—the earth pink and yellow cliffs to the north—the full pale moon about to go down in an early morning lavender sky... pink and purple hills in front and the scrubby fine dull green cedars—and a feeling of much space—It is a very beautiful world." #okeeffemodern ⠀ ⠀
- After Stieglitz died in 1946, #GeorgiaOKeeffe moved permanently to rural New Mexico, acquiring two conventional adobe structures for her homes. In her art, she drew upon the new motifs and colors of her adopted landscape, but painted them in her distinctive style of bold colors and abstract forms. In a 1942 letter to the painter Arthur Dove she wrote, "I wish you could see what I see out the window—the earth pink and yellow cliffs to the north—the full pale moon about to go down in an early morning lavender sky... pink and purple hills in front and the scrubby fine dull green cedars—and a feeling of much space—It is a very beautiful world." #okeeffemodern ⠀ ⠀
- 📍 London, England: This fall, one of our Monet paintings will be hopping across the pond to London for the @tate show, Impressionists in London, French artists in exile (1870–1904), an exhibition that will map the connections between French and British artists, patrons, and art dealers during the 1870’s when the Franco-Prussian war raged, insurrection ran rampant in Paris, and numerous French artists sought refuge across the Channel. As such, @curatorialchronicles decided to drop by, not only to see our painting’s new temporary home, but also to take a closer look at Tate’s gallery dedicated to one of the pioneers of British Romanticism, #WilliamBlake, and his fellow Londoner, #WilliamHogarth—both represented in the #bkmeuropeanart collection. #bkmtravels
- 📍 London, England: This fall, one of our Monet paintings will be hopping across the pond to London for the @tate show, Impressionists in London, French artists in exile (1870–1904), an exhibition that will map the connections between French and British artists, patrons, and art dealers during the 1870’s when the Franco-Prussian war raged, insurrection ran rampant in Paris, and numerous French artists sought refuge across the Channel. As such, @curatorialchronicles decided to drop by, not only to see our painting’s new temporary home, but also to take a closer look at Tate’s gallery dedicated to one of the pioneers of British Romanticism, #WilliamBlake , and his fellow Londoner, #WilliamHogarth —both represented in the #bkmeuropeanart collection. #bkmtravels
- 📍 London, England: This fall, one of our Monet paintings will be hopping across the pond to London for the @tate show, Impressionists in London, French artists in exile (1870–1904), an exhibition that will map the connections between French and British artists, patrons, and art dealers during the 1870’s when the Franco-Prussian war raged, insurrection ran rampant in Paris, and numerous French artists sought refuge across the Channel. As such, @curatorialchronicles decided to drop by, not only to see our painting’s new temporary home, but also to take a closer look at Tate’s gallery dedicated to one of the pioneers of British Romanticism, #WilliamBlake, and his fellow Londoner, #WilliamHogarth—both represented in the #bkmeuropeanart collection. #bkmtravels
- During the first week of the public conservation treatment of A Storm in the Rocky Mountains, Mt. Rosalie (1866), paintings conservators made a few discoveries about the #Albert Bierstadt's working practice. The painting was examined closely using infrared reflectography (IRR), a technique commonly used to look for preparatory sketches or compositional changes that are often hidden beneath the top paint layers. Find out what they uncovered at bit.ly/bkmconservation. #bkmconservation
- During the first week of the public conservation treatment of A Storm in the Rocky Mountains, Mt. Rosalie (1866), paintings conservators made a few discoveries about the #Albert Bierstadt& #39;s working practice. The painting was examined closely using infrared reflectography (IRR), a technique commonly used to look for preparatory sketches or compositional changes that are often hidden beneath the top paint layers. Find out what they uncovered at bit.ly/bkmconservation. #bkmconservation
- During the first week of the public conservation treatment of A Storm in the Rocky Mountains, Mt. Rosalie (1866), paintings conservators made a few discoveries about the #Albert Bierstadt's working practice. The painting was examined closely using infrared reflectography (IRR), a technique commonly used to look for preparatory sketches or compositional changes that are often hidden beneath the top paint layers. Find out what they uncovered at bit.ly/bkmconservation. #bkmconservation
- In early 1971, Kay Brown, Dindga McCannon, and Faith Ringgold gathered a group of black women at McCannon’s Brooklyn home to discuss their common frustrations in trying to build their careers as artists. Out of this initial gathering came one of the first exhibitions of professional black women artists, “Where We At”—Black Women Artists, 1971. Adopting the show’s title as their name, the collective began meeting at members’ homes and studios, building support systems for making their work, while assisting each other with personal matters such as childcare. #wewantedarevolution⠀
- In early 1971, Kay Brown, Dindga McCannon, and Faith Ringgold gathered a group of black women at McCannon’s Brooklyn home to discuss their common frustrations in trying to build their careers as artists. Out of this initial gathering came one of the first exhibitions of professional black women artists, “Where We At”—Black Women Artists, 1971. Adopting the show’s title as their name, the collective began meeting at members’ homes and studios, building support systems for making their work, while assisting each other with personal matters such as childcare. #wewantedarevolution
- In early 1971, Kay Brown, Dindga McCannon, and Faith Ringgold gathered a group of black women at McCannon’s Brooklyn home to discuss their common frustrations in trying to build their careers as artists. Out of this initial gathering came one of the first exhibitions of professional black women artists, “Where We At”—Black Women Artists, 1971. Adopting the show’s title as their name, the collective began meeting at members’ homes and studios, building support systems for making their work, while assisting each other with personal matters such as childcare. #wewantedarevolution⠀
- Join director @naimaramchap tonight at 7pm for a screening and conversation on her film And Nothing Happened (2016, 15 min.). Be sure to stop by #WeWantedaRevolution anytime between 11am and 10pm to watch our looping series of new short films by Ramos-Chapman and other young, black, queer, female-identified, and gender-nonconforming artists and filmmakers working in Brooklyn today. All part of our Black Queer Brooklyn on Film series, taking place Thursdays in June. Free with Museum admission. Details and film schedule available at link in bio. #pride2017⠀
- Join director @naimaramchap tonight at 7pm for a screening and conversation on her film And Nothing Happened (2016, 15 min.). Be sure to stop by #WeWantedaRevolution anytime between 11am and 10pm to watch our looping series of new short films by Ramos-Chapman and other young, black, queer, female-identified, and gender-nonconforming artists and filmmakers working in Brooklyn today. All part of our Black Queer Brooklyn on Film series, taking place Thursdays in June. Free with Museum admission. Details and film schedule available at link in bio. #pride2017
- Join director @naimaramchap tonight at 7pm for a screening and conversation on her film And Nothing Happened (2016, 15 min.). Be sure to stop by #WeWantedaRevolution anytime between 11am and 10pm to watch our looping series of new short films by Ramos-Chapman and other young, black, queer, female-identified, and gender-nonconforming artists and filmmakers working in Brooklyn today. All part of our Black Queer Brooklyn on Film series, taking place Thursdays in June. Free with Museum admission. Details and film schedule available at link in bio. #pride2017⠀
- One of #GeorgiaOKeeffe's perennial subjects during her New Mexico years was the Cerro Pedernal, a flat-topped mountain that’s visible for miles in every direction. She painted it numerous times, at varied angles and distances. ⇨ O’Keeffe often worked on site, sketching, painting, and occasionally taking photographs in the hills and desert. In this photo she’s dressed in a few essential elements of her wardrobe, including a cotton wrap dress. ⇨ Just as she painted certain locations and objects over and over, O’Keeffe adopted a serial aesthetic in her wardrobe. Her collection of wrap dresses shows this loyalty to her favorite styles. #okeeffemodern⠀
- One of #GeorgiaOKeeffe & #39;s perennial subjects during her New Mexico years was the Cerro Pedernal, a flat-topped mountain that’s visible for miles in every direction. She painted it numerous times, at varied angles and distances. ⇨ O’Keeffe often worked on site, sketching, painting, and occasionally taking photographs in the hills and desert. In this photo she’s dressed in a few essential elements of her wardrobe, including a cotton wrap dress. ⇨ Just as she painted certain locations and objects over and over, O’Keeffe adopted a serial aesthetic in her wardrobe. Her collection of wrap dresses shows this loyalty to her favorite styles. #okeeffemodern
- One of #GeorgiaOKeeffe's perennial subjects during her New Mexico years was the Cerro Pedernal, a flat-topped mountain that’s visible for miles in every direction. She painted it numerous times, at varied angles and distances. ⇨ O’Keeffe often worked on site, sketching, painting, and occasionally taking photographs in the hills and desert. In this photo she’s dressed in a few essential elements of her wardrobe, including a cotton wrap dress. ⇨ Just as she painted certain locations and objects over and over, O’Keeffe adopted a serial aesthetic in her wardrobe. Her collection of wrap dresses shows this loyalty to her favorite styles. #okeeffemodern⠀
- A little #bluesday inspiration from #BKMAsianart: Not only is this print among the most famous of the great printmaker #KatsushikaHokusai’s works, but it is also one of the earliest versions of this image. View of Mt. Fuji from a Boat at Ushibori from "Thirty-Six Views of Fuji," is an example of an all-blue or mostly blue woodblock color print called aizuri-e or "blue picture." In later impressions, the central band of reeds behind the boat is lost. Also notable is the tilted perspective of the boat, which allows us see the vessel’s interior. #infinitebluebkm 🔵⠀
- A little #bluesday inspiration from #BKMAsianart: Not only is this print among the most famous of the great printmaker #KatsushikaHokusai ’s works, but it is also one of the earliest versions of this image. View of Mt. Fuji from a Boat at Ushibori from "Thirty-Six Views of Fuji," is an example of an all-blue or mostly blue woodblock color print called aizuri-e or "blue picture." In later impressions, the central band of reeds behind the boat is lost. Also notable is the tilted perspective of the boat, which allows us see the vessel’s interior. #infinitebluebkm 🔵⠀
- A little #bluesday inspiration from #BKMAsianart: Not only is this print among the most famous of the great printmaker #KatsushikaHokusai’s works, but it is also one of the earliest versions of this image. View of Mt. Fuji from a Boat at Ushibori from "Thirty-Six Views of Fuji," is an example of an all-blue or mostly blue woodblock color print called aizuri-e or "blue picture." In later impressions, the central band of reeds behind the boat is lost. Also notable is the tilted perspective of the boat, which allows us see the vessel’s interior. #infinitebluebkm 🔵⠀
- #JeremyDeller's Iggy Pop Life Class resulted in 107 drawings ranging from subtly sinuous line sketches delineating the naked form to highly detailed portraits. Accessioned into the Museum’s collection, these drawings can inspire generations of visitors to contemplate Pop’s “performed” body and, more broadly, the dynamic, still vital relationship between performance, drawing, and the male form. This is the final week to check out these resulting drawings along with works from our historical collections, chosen by Deller. #iggypoplifeclass ends Sunday, June 18.⠀
- #JeremyDeller & #39;s Iggy Pop Life Class resulted in 107 drawings ranging from subtly sinuous line sketches delineating the naked form to highly detailed portraits. Accessioned into the Museum’s collection, these drawings can inspire generations of visitors to contemplate Pop’s “performed” body and, more broadly, the dynamic, still vital relationship between performance, drawing, and the male form. This is the final week to check out these resulting drawings along with works from our historical collections, chosen by Deller. #iggypoplifeclass ends Sunday, June 18.⠀
- #JeremyDeller's Iggy Pop Life Class resulted in 107 drawings ranging from subtly sinuous line sketches delineating the naked form to highly detailed portraits. Accessioned into the Museum’s collection, these drawings can inspire generations of visitors to contemplate Pop’s “performed” body and, more broadly, the dynamic, still vital relationship between performance, drawing, and the male form. This is the final week to check out these resulting drawings along with works from our historical collections, chosen by Deller. #iggypoplifeclass ends Sunday, June 18.⠀
- Ever since her days on the Texas Panhandle, #GeorgiaOKeeffe had harbored a deep affection for the big skies and openness of the American West. In 1929 she spent three months painting New Mexico’s bright blue skies, white animal bones, brown adobe, and pink and red stony cliffs in her distinctive style of bold colors and abstract forms. The American West made O’Keeffe feel so exhilarated and productive that she named northern New Mexico “my country” and promised to return as often as possible. After Stieglitz died in 1946 she moved permanently to New Mexico and continued to draw upon the motifs and colors of her adopted landscape. #okeeffemodern ⠀
- Ever since her days on the Texas Panhandle, #GeorgiaOKeeffe had harbored a deep affection for the big skies and openness of the American West. In 1929 she spent three months painting New Mexico’s bright blue skies, white animal bones, brown adobe, and pink and red stony cliffs in her distinctive style of bold colors and abstract forms. The American West made O’Keeffe feel so exhilarated and productive that she named northern New Mexico “my country” and promised to return as often as possible. After Stieglitz died in 1946 she moved permanently to New Mexico and continued to draw upon the motifs and colors of her adopted landscape. #okeeffemodern
- Ever since her days on the Texas Panhandle, #GeorgiaOKeeffe had harbored a deep affection for the big skies and openness of the American West. In 1929 she spent three months painting New Mexico’s bright blue skies, white animal bones, brown adobe, and pink and red stony cliffs in her distinctive style of bold colors and abstract forms. The American West made O’Keeffe feel so exhilarated and productive that she named northern New Mexico “my country” and promised to return as often as possible. After Stieglitz died in 1946 she moved permanently to New Mexico and continued to draw upon the motifs and colors of her adopted landscape. #okeeffemodern ⠀
- #BetyeSaar’s The Liberation of Aunt Jemima: Cocktail combines the iconography of the Black Power Movement, political violence, and aspirational middle-class American culture. It uses them to critique the racist stereotypes of black femininity and speak to the revolutionary aims of Black Liberation movements. Featuring a handmade label with a “mammy” figure on the front and a Black Power fist on the back, the ubiquitous California wine jug turned Molotov cocktail wryly comments on the potential and promise of armed resistance to oppression. #wewantedarevolution⠀
- #BetyeSaar ’s The Liberation of Aunt Jemima: Cocktail combines the iconography of the Black Power Movement, political violence, and aspirational middle-class American culture. It uses them to critique the racist stereotypes of black femininity and speak to the revolutionary aims of Black Liberation movements. Featuring a handmade label with a “mammy” figure on the front and a Black Power fist on the back, the ubiquitous California wine jug turned Molotov cocktail wryly comments on the potential and promise of armed resistance to oppression. #wewantedarevolution
- #BetyeSaar’s The Liberation of Aunt Jemima: Cocktail combines the iconography of the Black Power Movement, political violence, and aspirational middle-class American culture. It uses them to critique the racist stereotypes of black femininity and speak to the revolutionary aims of Black Liberation movements. Featuring a handmade label with a “mammy” figure on the front and a Black Power fist on the back, the ubiquitous California wine jug turned Molotov cocktail wryly comments on the potential and promise of armed resistance to oppression. #wewantedarevolution⠀
- A little #bluesday inspiration from #BKMAmericanart: With richly saturated colors and an abundance of botanical decoration, #JosephStella endowed his image of the Virgin Mary with iconic power and spiritual mystery. Framed within an arch of fruits, flowers, and fanciful birds and wearing an embellished blue robe, the Madonna stands serenely with eyes closed and hands crossed in prayer against the backdrop of the Bay of Naples. For Stella, the garland of fruits and flowers—conventional symbols of the Madonna’s fertility—also signified his own creativity. #infinitebluebkm 🔵⠀
- A little #bluesday inspiration from #BKMAmericanart: With richly saturated colors and an abundance of botanical decoration, #JosephStella endowed his image of the Virgin Mary with iconic power and spiritual mystery. Framed within an arch of fruits, flowers, and fanciful birds and wearing an embellished blue robe, the Madonna stands serenely with eyes closed and hands crossed in prayer against the backdrop of the Bay of Naples. For Stella, the garland of fruits and flowers—conventional symbols of the Madonna’s fertility—also signified his own creativity. #infinitebluebkm 🔵⠀
- A little #bluesday inspiration from #BKMAmericanart: With richly saturated colors and an abundance of botanical decoration, #JosephStella endowed his image of the Virgin Mary with iconic power and spiritual mystery. Framed within an arch of fruits, flowers, and fanciful birds and wearing an embellished blue robe, the Madonna stands serenely with eyes closed and hands crossed in prayer against the backdrop of the Bay of Naples. For Stella, the garland of fruits and flowers—conventional symbols of the Madonna’s fertility—also signified his own creativity. #infinitebluebkm 🔵⠀

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