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- Our #GrapeOfTheWeek is: #Viognier! As recently as 50 years ago, Viognier was mind-bogglingly close to going extinct. Like all French grapes, it had been hammered by phylloxera in the late 19th century. Its bounceback was severely curtailed by World War I though, as an extraordinarily low-yielding varietal grown on extraordinarily steep cliffs is not conducive to a nation short on manpower. Its population stayed remarkably low for decades, and as late as the 1960s there were only *14 hectares* left in France. Viognier's time finally arrived in the 1980s, as both interest and clonal quality began to rapidly rise in both France and California, with support from the @rhonerangers. Today, Viognier occupies over 4000 hectares (ha) in France, 3000 ha in California, 1700 ha in Argentina...certainly all a far cry from a mere 14! The interest in Viognier is not hard to understand. Its signature quality is its unmistakeable bouquet, heady and hedonistic, with similar petrol aromas to those admired by Riesling and Muscat lovers. Another hallmark is its very low acidity, presenting instead a luscious full-yet-soft opulence. It often elicits fascinating, unique tasting notes such as gingerbread and rose. Its most prestigious expression remains in its homeland in the #NorthernRh么ne, where the #Condrieu appellation produces magnificent mono varietals. 馃崌 This Saturday from 2-7pm, our Free Tasting Series will be #WhiteRh么ne! In addition to gorgeous Condrieu Viognier, we'll be highlighting some of the other underrated white grapes of the region, including #Marsanne, #Roussane, #Clairette, and #GrenacheBlanc. 馃
- Our #GrapeOfTheWeek is: #Viognier ! As recently as 50 years ago, Viognier was mind-bogglingly close to going extinct. Like all French grapes, it had been hammered by phylloxera in the late 19th century. Its bounceback was severely curtailed by World War I though, as an extraordinarily low-yielding varietal grown on extraordinarily steep cliffs is not conducive to a nation short on manpower. Its population stayed remarkably low for decades, and as late as the 1960s there were only *14 hectares* left in France. Viognier& #39;s time finally arrived in the 1980s, as both interest and clonal quality began to rapidly rise in both France and California, with support from the @rhonerangers. Today, Viognier occupies over 4000 hectares (ha) in France, 3000 ha in California, 1700 ha in Argentina...certainly all a far cry from a mere 14! The interest in Viognier is not hard to understand. Its signature quality is its unmistakeable bouquet, heady and hedonistic, with similar petrol aromas to those admired by Riesling and Muscat lovers. Another hallmark is its very low acidity, presenting instead a luscious full-yet-soft opulence. It often elicits fascinating, unique tasting notes such as gingerbread and rose. Its most prestigious expression remains in its homeland in the #NorthernRh 么ne, where the #Condrieu appellation produces magnificent mono varietals. 馃崌 This Saturday from 2-7pm, our Free Tasting Series will be #WhiteRh 么ne! In addition to gorgeous Condrieu Viognier, we& #39;ll be highlighting some of the other underrated white grapes of the region, including #Marsanne , #Roussane , #Clairette , and #GrenacheBlanc . 馃
- Our #GrapeOfTheWeek is: #Viognier! As recently as 50 years ago, Viognier was mind-bogglingly close to going extinct. Like all French grapes, it had been hammered by phylloxera in the late 19th century. Its bounceback was severely curtailed by World War I though, as an extraordinarily low-yielding varietal grown on extraordinarily steep cliffs is not conducive to a nation short on manpower. Its population stayed remarkably low for decades, and as late as the 1960s there were only *14 hectares* left in France. Viognier's time finally arrived in the 1980s, as both interest and clonal quality began to rapidly rise in both France and California, with support from the @rhonerangers. Today, Viognier occupies over 4000 hectares (ha) in France, 3000 ha in California, 1700 ha in Argentina...certainly all a far cry from a mere 14! The interest in Viognier is not hard to understand. Its signature quality is its unmistakeable bouquet, heady and hedonistic, with similar petrol aromas to those admired by Riesling and Muscat lovers. Another hallmark is its very low acidity, presenting instead a luscious full-yet-soft opulence. It often elicits fascinating, unique tasting notes such as gingerbread and rose. Its most prestigious expression remains in its homeland in the #NorthernRh么ne, where the #Condrieu appellation produces magnificent mono varietals. 馃崌 This Saturday from 2-7pm, our Free Tasting Series will be #WhiteRh么ne! In addition to gorgeous Condrieu Viognier, we'll be highlighting some of the other underrated white grapes of the region, including #Marsanne, #Roussane, #Clairette, and #GrenacheBlanc. 馃
- Our #GrapeOfTheWeek is: #Pinotage! A cross between Pinot Noir and Cinsault, Pinotage is often tabbed as South Africa's signature grape. It was first created at Stellenbosch University to the east of Cape Town, by the school's first viticulture professor Abraham Izak Perold, who planted a few seeds and promptly forgot about them. It wasn't until a few years later that the seedlings were rediscovered and started to garner real interest. The name derives from Pinot (of course) and Hermitage, as Cinsault was erroneously known in South Africa at the time. In fact, the varietal was very nearly named 'Herminoir' instead! While South Africa is still by far the world's leading Pinotage producer, it has started to make inroads in places like New Zealand, California, Israel, and Brazil. It has something of a polarizing reputation right now - promoters highlight the mulberry, blackberry, earthy flavors it has at its highs, while detractors compare some Pinotages to raspberry vinegar or even acetone at its lows. It doesn't seem like these detractors will make many inroads, though, as South Africa and other regions continue to find fresh new things to do with this versatile grape. 馃崌 This Saturday from 2-7pm, our Free Tasting Series will be "Summer Sale Selections"! We still have some great wines for these hot summer days on deep discount, including an awesome light Pinotage from Lammershoek in South Africa's #Swartland region. With a little chill, it becomes as great a choice to fend off the heat as any white you can think of! 馃嵎
- Our #GrapeOfTheWeek is: #Pinotage ! A cross between Pinot Noir and Cinsault, Pinotage is often tabbed as South Africa& #39;s signature grape. It was first created at Stellenbosch University to the east of Cape Town, by the school& #39;s first viticulture professor Abraham Izak Perold, who planted a few seeds and promptly forgot about them. It wasn& #39;t until a few years later that the seedlings were rediscovered and started to garner real interest. The name derives from Pinot (of course) and Hermitage, as Cinsault was erroneously known in South Africa at the time. In fact, the varietal was very nearly named & #39;Herminoir & #39; instead! While South Africa is still by far the world& #39;s leading Pinotage producer, it has started to make inroads in places like New Zealand, California, Israel, and Brazil. It has something of a polarizing reputation right now - promoters highlight the mulberry, blackberry, earthy flavors it has at its highs, while detractors compare some Pinotages to raspberry vinegar or even acetone at its lows. It doesn& #39;t seem like these detractors will make many inroads, though, as South Africa and other regions continue to find fresh new things to do with this versatile grape. 馃崌 This Saturday from 2-7pm, our Free Tasting Series will be "Summer Sale Selections"! We still have some great wines for these hot summer days on deep discount, including an awesome light Pinotage from Lammershoek in South Africa& #39;s #Swartland region. With a little chill, it becomes as great a choice to fend off the heat as any white you can think of! 馃嵎
- Our #GrapeOfTheWeek is: #Pinotage! A cross between Pinot Noir and Cinsault, Pinotage is often tabbed as South Africa's signature grape. It was first created at Stellenbosch University to the east of Cape Town, by the school's first viticulture professor Abraham Izak Perold, who planted a few seeds and promptly forgot about them. It wasn't until a few years later that the seedlings were rediscovered and started to garner real interest. The name derives from Pinot (of course) and Hermitage, as Cinsault was erroneously known in South Africa at the time. In fact, the varietal was very nearly named 'Herminoir' instead! While South Africa is still by far the world's leading Pinotage producer, it has started to make inroads in places like New Zealand, California, Israel, and Brazil. It has something of a polarizing reputation right now - promoters highlight the mulberry, blackberry, earthy flavors it has at its highs, while detractors compare some Pinotages to raspberry vinegar or even acetone at its lows. It doesn't seem like these detractors will make many inroads, though, as South Africa and other regions continue to find fresh new things to do with this versatile grape. 馃崌 This Saturday from 2-7pm, our Free Tasting Series will be "Summer Sale Selections"! We still have some great wines for these hot summer days on deep discount, including an awesome light Pinotage from Lammershoek in South Africa's #Swartland region. With a little chill, it becomes as great a choice to fend off the heat as any white you can think of! 馃嵎
- Our #GrapeOfTheWeek is: #Syrah! There are about fifty different origin stories for Syrah, all of them with high drama. The most oft-repeated is that it was brought to the #Rh么ne Valley in the 12th c. by a crusader, Gaspard de Sterimberg, returning from the Holy Land, where it had migrated from the city of Shiraz in Persia - which was, in the classical world, perhaps the wine capital of the world. Other theories include legions of Roman Emperor Probus bringing the grape from Syracuse (Syrah-cuse), an Ancient Greek origin (the island of Syra), a relation to a Syrian grape described by Pliny the Elder (Syriaca), the cousin of Albanian grapes (Serina and Sheshizi). But we regret very much to rain on ALL these parades - genetic analysis has determined that Syrah is, in fact, a cross of a Rh么ne grape Dureza and Savoyard grape Mondeuse. But that doesn't mean you have to give up all romance - we don't know when this cross may have occurred, so Syrah may still be closely related to the 'extinct' grape Allobrogica, which ruled southeastern Gaul in Pliny the Elder's time, and its name may derive from the Latin 'serus', meaning late-ripening (which it, naturally, is). Whatever its history in millennia past, Syrah has certainly enjoyed a fairly absurd explosion in popularity in the last few decades. In France, the grape grew from 1600 hectares (HA) in 1958 to 68500 HA in 2009. In just 4 years in Spain from 2004 to 2008, it increased from 3000 HA to a jaw-dropping 41000. In California, it went from 162 in 1993 to 6900 in 2003. Oh, and of course, there is a hefty 44000 HA in Australia, representing almost a quarter of the grape crush. So, yeah, you could say that tastes for Syrah have increased! Said tastes are quite distinctive and famous - chocolate, black pepper, leather, meat, even tar or burnt rubber. Yummy! As a grape with tantalizing foggy romantic origins and widespread modern mass appeal, Syrah has truly taken up residence as one of the wine world's superstars. 馃崌 This Saturday from 2-7pm, our Free Tasting Series will be "Syrah Near and Far"! We will certainly be paying special attention to the grape's home in the Rh么ne Valley, but also visit some of its new homes. 馃嵎
- Our #GrapeOfTheWeek is: #Syrah ! There are about fifty different origin stories for Syrah, all of them with high drama. The most oft-repeated is that it was brought to the #Rh 么ne Valley in the 12th c. by a crusader, Gaspard de Sterimberg, returning from the Holy Land, where it had migrated from the city of Shiraz in Persia - which was, in the classical world, perhaps the wine capital of the world. Other theories include legions of Roman Emperor Probus bringing the grape from Syracuse (Syrah-cuse), an Ancient Greek origin (the island of Syra), a relation to a Syrian grape described by Pliny the Elder (Syriaca), the cousin of Albanian grapes (Serina and Sheshizi). But we regret very much to rain on ALL these parades - genetic analysis has determined that Syrah is, in fact, a cross of a Rh么ne grape Dureza and Savoyard grape Mondeuse. But that doesn& #39;t mean you have to give up all romance - we don& #39;t know when this cross may have occurred, so Syrah may still be closely related to the & #39;extinct & #39; grape Allobrogica, which ruled southeastern Gaul in Pliny the Elder& #39;s time, and its name may derive from the Latin & #39;serus & #39; , meaning late-ripening (which it, naturally, is). Whatever its history in millennia past, Syrah has certainly enjoyed a fairly absurd explosion in popularity in the last few decades. In France, the grape grew from 1600 hectares (HA) in 1958 to 68500 HA in 2009. In just 4 years in Spain from 2004 to 2008, it increased from 3000 HA to a jaw-dropping 41000. In California, it went from 162 in 1993 to 6900 in 2003. Oh, and of course, there is a hefty 44000 HA in Australia, representing almost a quarter of the grape crush. So, yeah, you could say that tastes for Syrah have increased! Said tastes are quite distinctive and famous - chocolate, black pepper, leather, meat, even tar or burnt rubber. Yummy! As a grape with tantalizing foggy romantic origins and widespread modern mass appeal, Syrah has truly taken up residence as one of the wine world& #39;s superstars. 馃崌 This Saturday from 2-7pm, our Free Tasting Series will be "Syrah Near and Far"! We will certainly be paying special attention to the grape& #39;s home in the Rh么ne Valley, but also visit some of its new homes. 馃嵎
- Our #GrapeOfTheWeek is: #Syrah! There are about fifty different origin stories for Syrah, all of them with high drama. The most oft-repeated is that it was brought to the #Rh么ne Valley in the 12th c. by a crusader, Gaspard de Sterimberg, returning from the Holy Land, where it had migrated from the city of Shiraz in Persia - which was, in the classical world, perhaps the wine capital of the world. Other theories include legions of Roman Emperor Probus bringing the grape from Syracuse (Syrah-cuse), an Ancient Greek origin (the island of Syra), a relation to a Syrian grape described by Pliny the Elder (Syriaca), the cousin of Albanian grapes (Serina and Sheshizi). But we regret very much to rain on ALL these parades - genetic analysis has determined that Syrah is, in fact, a cross of a Rh么ne grape Dureza and Savoyard grape Mondeuse. But that doesn't mean you have to give up all romance - we don't know when this cross may have occurred, so Syrah may still be closely related to the 'extinct' grape Allobrogica, which ruled southeastern Gaul in Pliny the Elder's time, and its name may derive from the Latin 'serus', meaning late-ripening (which it, naturally, is). Whatever its history in millennia past, Syrah has certainly enjoyed a fairly absurd explosion in popularity in the last few decades. In France, the grape grew from 1600 hectares (HA) in 1958 to 68500 HA in 2009. In just 4 years in Spain from 2004 to 2008, it increased from 3000 HA to a jaw-dropping 41000. In California, it went from 162 in 1993 to 6900 in 2003. Oh, and of course, there is a hefty 44000 HA in Australia, representing almost a quarter of the grape crush. So, yeah, you could say that tastes for Syrah have increased! Said tastes are quite distinctive and famous - chocolate, black pepper, leather, meat, even tar or burnt rubber. Yummy! As a grape with tantalizing foggy romantic origins and widespread modern mass appeal, Syrah has truly taken up residence as one of the wine world's superstars. 馃崌 This Saturday from 2-7pm, our Free Tasting Series will be "Syrah Near and Far"! We will certainly be paying special attention to the grape's home in the Rh么ne Valley, but also visit some of its new homes. 馃嵎
- Our #GrapeOfTheWeek is: #Aligot茅! Aligot茅 is probably most famous for the company it keeps. It is the fourth most grown grape in #Burgundy, and second among white grapes behind Chardonnay - though still at a rate of 8 acres of Chard for every 1 of Aligot茅. It is a plucky little grape to be sure though, very resistant to cold and able to thrive in vineyard sites at the top or bottom of Burgundian hills where Pinot Noir or Chardonnay wither. Its unassuming workman status goes even further - it is combined with Cassis liqueur to create the cocktail #kir, and it is often blended with grapes like Sacy to province some acidity. And acidity it certainly has, as most Aligot茅 tasting notes will emphasize its tart brightness. But Aligot茅's reach doesn't end with its 2000 French hectares. Its popularity in Eastern Europe vaults the grape to the 22nd-most planted in the world, thanks to 1100 hectares in Bulgaria, 7200 in Romania, 9600 in Ukraine, and a staggering 15800 hectares in tiny Moldova. We, for one, are glad that for all the yeoman's work Aligot茅 does in France, it gets its due as a lead dog somewhere. 馃崌 This Saturday from 2-7pm, our free tasting series will be "Beaujolais By Year"! Though Aligot茅 is the third-most planted variety in Bojo, we will still be breaking it down in a roughly identical ratio as the region grows - which is 98% #Gamay. But we will especially be focusing on comparing and contrasting the year-by-year vintages since 2013, so you'll know what to look for if you do want a Beaujolais Aligot茅! 馃嵎 #Aligote #Beaujolais #Bojo
- Our #GrapeOfTheWeek is: #Aligot 茅! Aligot茅 is probably most famous for the company it keeps. It is the fourth most grown grape in #Burgundy , and second among white grapes behind Chardonnay - though still at a rate of 8 acres of Chard for every 1 of Aligot茅. It is a plucky little grape to be sure though, very resistant to cold and able to thrive in vineyard sites at the top or bottom of Burgundian hills where Pinot Noir or Chardonnay wither. Its unassuming workman status goes even further - it is combined with Cassis liqueur to create the cocktail #kir , and it is often blended with grapes like Sacy to province some acidity. And acidity it certainly has, as most Aligot茅 tasting notes will emphasize its tart brightness. But Aligot茅& #39;s reach doesn& #39;t end with its 2000 French hectares. Its popularity in Eastern Europe vaults the grape to the 22nd-most planted in the world, thanks to 1100 hectares in Bulgaria, 7200 in Romania, 9600 in Ukraine, and a staggering 15800 hectares in tiny Moldova. We, for one, are glad that for all the yeoman& #39;s work Aligot茅 does in France, it gets its due as a lead dog somewhere. 馃崌 This Saturday from 2-7pm, our free tasting series will be "Beaujolais By Year"! Though Aligot茅 is the third-most planted variety in Bojo, we will still be breaking it down in a roughly identical ratio as the region grows - which is 98% #Gamay . But we will especially be focusing on comparing and contrasting the year-by-year vintages since 2013, so you& #39;ll know what to look for if you do want a Beaujolais Aligot茅! 馃嵎 #Aligote #Beaujolais #Bojo
- Our #GrapeOfTheWeek is: #Aligot茅! Aligot茅 is probably most famous for the company it keeps. It is the fourth most grown grape in #Burgundy, and second among white grapes behind Chardonnay - though still at a rate of 8 acres of Chard for every 1 of Aligot茅. It is a plucky little grape to be sure though, very resistant to cold and able to thrive in vineyard sites at the top or bottom of Burgundian hills where Pinot Noir or Chardonnay wither. Its unassuming workman status goes even further - it is combined with Cassis liqueur to create the cocktail #kir, and it is often blended with grapes like Sacy to province some acidity. And acidity it certainly has, as most Aligot茅 tasting notes will emphasize its tart brightness. But Aligot茅's reach doesn't end with its 2000 French hectares. Its popularity in Eastern Europe vaults the grape to the 22nd-most planted in the world, thanks to 1100 hectares in Bulgaria, 7200 in Romania, 9600 in Ukraine, and a staggering 15800 hectares in tiny Moldova. We, for one, are glad that for all the yeoman's work Aligot茅 does in France, it gets its due as a lead dog somewhere. 馃崌 This Saturday from 2-7pm, our free tasting series will be "Beaujolais By Year"! Though Aligot茅 is the third-most planted variety in Bojo, we will still be breaking it down in a roughly identical ratio as the region grows - which is 98% #Gamay. But we will especially be focusing on comparing and contrasting the year-by-year vintages since 2013, so you'll know what to look for if you do want a Beaujolais Aligot茅! 馃嵎 #Aligote #Beaujolais #Bojo

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