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- White House chief of staff John F. Kelly’s voice grew thin at points during an extraordinary and emotional briefing, as questions about President Donald Trump’s handling of the Niger deaths and other military losses swamped the White House this week. Kelly told reporters he counseled Trump on what to say to families of those killed on the battlefield, lending his credibility as a retired four-star general who also lost his son in battle. He also said “it stuns me” that Democratic Rep. Frederica S. Wilson listened in on a call, which was heard on speakerphone, between Trump and the widow of Sgt. La David T. Johnson, who was killed in an ambush in Niger. (Video: @reuters)
- White House chief of staff John F. Kelly’s voice grew thin at points during an extraordinary and emotional briefing, as questions about President Donald Trump’s handling of the Niger deaths and other military losses swamped the White House this week. Kelly told reporters he counseled Trump on what to say to families of those killed on the battlefield, lending his credibility as a retired four-star general who also lost his son in battle. He also said “it stuns me” that Democratic Rep. Frederica S. Wilson listened in on a call, which was heard on speakerphone, between Trump and the widow of Sgt. La David T. Johnson, who was killed in an ambush in Niger. (Video: @reuters )
- White House chief of staff John F. Kelly’s voice grew thin at points during an extraordinary and emotional briefing, as questions about President Donald Trump’s handling of the Niger deaths and other military losses swamped the White House this week. Kelly told reporters he counseled Trump on what to say to families of those killed on the battlefield, lending his credibility as a retired four-star general who also lost his son in battle. He also said “it stuns me” that Democratic Rep. Frederica S. Wilson listened in on a call, which was heard on speakerphone, between Trump and the widow of Sgt. La David T. Johnson, who was killed in an ambush in Niger. (Video: @reuters)
- Canada’s prime minister Justin Trudeau shed tears as he spoke about the death of Gord Downie, the frontman for the band Tragically Hip whose songs about Canada lodged themselves deep into the nation’s consciousness. Trudeau spoke to reporters on Wednesday shortly after Downie’s family announced the singer had died Tuesday evening. He was 53. Downie, dubbed Canada’s unofficial poet laureate, had glioblastoma, an aggressive and incurable form of brain cancer. He died with his children and family close by, according to a statement from his family. “Gord was my friend,” said a visibly shaken Trudeau. “But Gord was everyone’s friend." (Photo: Adam Scotti/Prime Minister's Office via Reuters)
- Canada’s prime minister Justin Trudeau shed tears as he spoke about the death of Gord Downie, the frontman for the band Tragically Hip whose songs about Canada lodged themselves deep into the nation’s consciousness. Trudeau spoke to reporters on Wednesday shortly after Downie’s family announced the singer had died Tuesday evening. He was 53. Downie, dubbed Canada’s unofficial poet laureate, had glioblastoma, an aggressive and incurable form of brain cancer. He died with his children and family close by, according to a statement from his family. “Gord was my friend,” said a visibly shaken Trudeau. “But Gord was everyone’s friend." (Photo: Adam Scotti/Prime Minister& #39;s Office via Reuters)
- Canada’s prime minister Justin Trudeau shed tears as he spoke about the death of Gord Downie, the frontman for the band Tragically Hip whose songs about Canada lodged themselves deep into the nation’s consciousness. Trudeau spoke to reporters on Wednesday shortly after Downie’s family announced the singer had died Tuesday evening. He was 53. Downie, dubbed Canada’s unofficial poet laureate, had glioblastoma, an aggressive and incurable form of brain cancer. He died with his children and family close by, according to a statement from his family. “Gord was my friend,” said a visibly shaken Trudeau. “But Gord was everyone’s friend." (Photo: Adam Scotti/Prime Minister's Office via Reuters)
- Bad blood 🔥. It was a heated exchange with Sen. Al Franken that started Attorney General Jeff Sessions's Russia problems earlier this year, and the rancor between the two men spilled over to Round 2 on Wednesday. They got into a testy back and forth during Sessions's testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee, with Franken accusing Sessions of repeatedly “moving the goal posts” on his denials of contacts with Russians, and Sessions accusing Franken of being “totally unfair.” The normally understated Sessions appeared visibly angry at certain points, exclaiming, “I don’t have to sit here and listen to his charges without having a chance to respond. Give me a break.” For all of Franken's efforts over their 15-minute exchange, he didn't really get Sessions to expand upon much. But that doesn't mean it wasn't entertaining.
- Bad blood 🔥. It was a heated exchange with Sen. Al Franken that started Attorney General Jeff Sessions& #39;s Russia problems earlier this year, and the rancor between the two men spilled over to Round 2 on Wednesday. They got into a testy back and forth during Sessions& #39;s testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee, with Franken accusing Sessions of repeatedly “moving the goal posts” on his denials of contacts with Russians, and Sessions accusing Franken of being “totally unfair.” The normally understated Sessions appeared visibly angry at certain points, exclaiming, “I don’t have to sit here and listen to his charges without having a chance to respond. Give me a break.” For all of Franken& #39;s efforts over their 15-minute exchange, he didn& #39;t really get Sessions to expand upon much. But that doesn& #39;t mean it wasn& #39;t entertaining.
- Bad blood 🔥. It was a heated exchange with Sen. Al Franken that started Attorney General Jeff Sessions's Russia problems earlier this year, and the rancor between the two men spilled over to Round 2 on Wednesday. They got into a testy back and forth during Sessions's testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee, with Franken accusing Sessions of repeatedly “moving the goal posts” on his denials of contacts with Russians, and Sessions accusing Franken of being “totally unfair.” The normally understated Sessions appeared visibly angry at certain points, exclaiming, “I don’t have to sit here and listen to his charges without having a chance to respond. Give me a break.” For all of Franken's efforts over their 15-minute exchange, he didn't really get Sessions to expand upon much. But that doesn't mean it wasn't entertaining.
- There was a time, even he’ll admit it, when @letterman cared about nothing more than his TV show. Today, as he tries to keep up with his son Harry, 13, that former life baffles him. He must miss it terribly, right? Nope. “Not for a second,” he says. That brooding guy on television, he shrugs, was “a different man.” It's true, Letterman has changed. He's not the same guy you remember seeing every weeknight. Once known for his clean shaven face and big smile, he now dons a bushy white beard. And his outlook is different. The smile is still around, though, and at 70, he remains a masterful storyteller — infinitely curious and as quick as a whip. But since leaving late night, he’s avoided his old playing field. He doesn’t watch. He hasn’t visited as a guest. He occupies his time with other things. Instead of telling jokes and stories in front of millions, he just tells them to Harry. And he loves where life has brought him. Get to know him again by reading our full profile on the former Late Night star: Link in bio. (Photos by Jesse Dittmar for The Washington Post.)
- There was a time, even he’ll admit it, when @letterman cared about nothing more than his TV show. Today, as he tries to keep up with his son Harry, 13, that former life baffles him. He must miss it terribly, right? Nope. “Not for a second,” he says. That brooding guy on television, he shrugs, was “a different man.” It& #39;s true, Letterman has changed. He& #39;s not the same guy you remember seeing every weeknight. Once known for his clean shaven face and big smile, he now dons a bushy white beard. And his outlook is different. The smile is still around, though, and at 70, he remains a masterful storyteller — infinitely curious and as quick as a whip. But since leaving late night, he’s avoided his old playing field. He doesn’t watch. He hasn’t visited as a guest. He occupies his time with other things. Instead of telling jokes and stories in front of millions, he just tells them to Harry. And he loves where life has brought him. Get to know him again by reading our full profile on the former Late Night star: Link in bio. (Photos by Jesse Dittmar for The Washington Post.)
- There was a time, even he’ll admit it, when @letterman cared about nothing more than his TV show. Today, as he tries to keep up with his son Harry, 13, that former life baffles him. He must miss it terribly, right? Nope. “Not for a second,” he says. That brooding guy on television, he shrugs, was “a different man.” It's true, Letterman has changed. He's not the same guy you remember seeing every weeknight. Once known for his clean shaven face and big smile, he now dons a bushy white beard. And his outlook is different. The smile is still around, though, and at 70, he remains a masterful storyteller — infinitely curious and as quick as a whip. But since leaving late night, he’s avoided his old playing field. He doesn’t watch. He hasn’t visited as a guest. He occupies his time with other things. Instead of telling jokes and stories in front of millions, he just tells them to Harry. And he loves where life has brought him. Get to know him again by reading our full profile on the former Late Night star: Link in bio. (Photos by Jesse Dittmar for The Washington Post.)
- The body of Sgt. La David T. Johnson, one of the U.S. Special Forces soldiers who was killed at the border of Niger and Mali on Oct. 4, arrived in Miami on Tuesday. His death was part of the deadliest combat incident since President Trump took office. In his call with Johnson’s widow, Myeshia Johnson, Trump told her, “He knew what he was signing up for, but I guess it hurts anyway,” according to the account of Rep. Frederica S. Wilson (D-Fla.), who was riding in a limousine with Johnson when the president called and heard the conversation on speakerphone. “He made her cry,” Wilson said. The congresswoman said she wanted to take the phone and “curse him out,” but that the Army sergeant holding the phone would not let her speak to the president. In a tweet Wednesday, Trump claimed Wilson “totally fabricated” her account of his call to the widow. Trump went on to back up his assertion by insisting he has “proof.” But Wilson stood her ground. Speaking on MSNBC, she called Trump’s call “horrible” and “insensitive.” “She was in tears. She was in tears. And she said, ‘He didn’t even remember his name,’” said Wilson. (Source: WPLG/AP)
- The body of Sgt. La David T. Johnson, one of the U.S. Special Forces soldiers who was killed at the border of Niger and Mali on Oct. 4, arrived in Miami on Tuesday. His death was part of the deadliest combat incident since President Trump took office. In his call with Johnson’s widow, Myeshia Johnson, Trump told her, “He knew what he was signing up for, but I guess it hurts anyway,” according to the account of Rep. Frederica S. Wilson (D-Fla.), who was riding in a limousine with Johnson when the president called and heard the conversation on speakerphone. “He made her cry,” Wilson said. The congresswoman said she wanted to take the phone and “curse him out,” but that the Army sergeant holding the phone would not let her speak to the president. In a tweet Wednesday, Trump claimed Wilson “totally fabricated” her account of his call to the widow. Trump went on to back up his assertion by insisting he has “proof.” But Wilson stood her ground. Speaking on MSNBC, she called Trump’s call “horrible” and “insensitive.” “She was in tears. She was in tears. And she said, ‘He didn’t even remember his name,’” said Wilson. (Source: WPLG/AP)
- The body of Sgt. La David T. Johnson, one of the U.S. Special Forces soldiers who was killed at the border of Niger and Mali on Oct. 4, arrived in Miami on Tuesday. His death was part of the deadliest combat incident since President Trump took office. In his call with Johnson’s widow, Myeshia Johnson, Trump told her, “He knew what he was signing up for, but I guess it hurts anyway,” according to the account of Rep. Frederica S. Wilson (D-Fla.), who was riding in a limousine with Johnson when the president called and heard the conversation on speakerphone. “He made her cry,” Wilson said. The congresswoman said she wanted to take the phone and “curse him out,” but that the Army sergeant holding the phone would not let her speak to the president. In a tweet Wednesday, Trump claimed Wilson “totally fabricated” her account of his call to the widow. Trump went on to back up his assertion by insisting he has “proof.” But Wilson stood her ground. Speaking on MSNBC, she called Trump’s call “horrible” and “insensitive.” “She was in tears. She was in tears. And she said, ‘He didn’t even remember his name,’” said Wilson. (Source: WPLG/AP)
- On Tuesday, U.S.-backed forces claimed to have full control of Raqqa, the Islamic State’s onetime capital and most symbolically important stronghold. The militant group — once known as al-Qaeda in Iraq — began seizing key cities in 2014 with the capture of Fallujah, Tikrit and Mosul. They continued to acquire land in Iraq until the end of 2015, when opposing forces started pushing the militants out of the cities. It retreated from Mosul, its last urban center in Iraq, in July 2017. With the loss of Raqqa, the Islamic State’s remaining areas of concentration are mostly in Syria’s Deir al-Zour and Iraq’s Anbar provinces, and a few scattered pockets elsewhere. In this photo by @kilicbil, a member of the Syrian Democratic Forces (the group backed by U.S. special forces) looks out from a building on the front line in the Islamic State's crumbling stronghold. (Photo via @afpphoto/Getty Images)
- On Tuesday, U.S.-backed forces claimed to have full control of Raqqa, the Islamic State’s onetime capital and most symbolically important stronghold. The militant group — once known as al-Qaeda in Iraq — began seizing key cities in 2014 with the capture of Fallujah, Tikrit and Mosul. They continued to acquire land in Iraq until the end of 2015, when opposing forces started pushing the militants out of the cities. It retreated from Mosul, its last urban center in Iraq, in July 2017. With the loss of Raqqa, the Islamic State’s remaining areas of concentration are mostly in Syria’s Deir al-Zour and Iraq’s Anbar provinces, and a few scattered pockets elsewhere. In this photo by @kilicbil , a member of the Syrian Democratic Forces (the group backed by U.S. special forces) looks out from a building on the front line in the Islamic State& #39;s crumbling stronghold. (Photo via @afpphoto /Getty Images)
- On Tuesday, U.S.-backed forces claimed to have full control of Raqqa, the Islamic State’s onetime capital and most symbolically important stronghold. The militant group — once known as al-Qaeda in Iraq — began seizing key cities in 2014 with the capture of Fallujah, Tikrit and Mosul. They continued to acquire land in Iraq until the end of 2015, when opposing forces started pushing the militants out of the cities. It retreated from Mosul, its last urban center in Iraq, in July 2017. With the loss of Raqqa, the Islamic State’s remaining areas of concentration are mostly in Syria’s Deir al-Zour and Iraq’s Anbar provinces, and a few scattered pockets elsewhere. In this photo by @kilicbil, a member of the Syrian Democratic Forces (the group backed by U.S. special forces) looks out from a building on the front line in the Islamic State's crumbling stronghold. (Photo via @afpphoto/Getty Images)
- The string of active volcanoes around the Pacific Ocean has lived up to its “Ring of Fire” name lately, sparking mass evacuations in Indonesia and unsettling part of southwestern Japan. The 450 or so volcanoes that make up the ring outline where the massive Pacific Plate grinds against other plates that form the Earth’s crust, creating a 25,000-mile long zone prone to earthquakes and other seismic upheaval. Mount Sinabung in Indonesia, pictured above, is one of those volcanoes and spews thick smoke and ash high into the atmosphere almost daily. Sinabung roared back to life in 2010 for the first time in 400 years. After another period of inactivity, it erupted once more in 2013 and has remained highly active since. (Photo: @afpphoto/Ivan Damanik/Getty Images)
- The string of active volcanoes around the Pacific Ocean has lived up to its “Ring of Fire” name lately, sparking mass evacuations in Indonesia and unsettling part of southwestern Japan. The 450 or so volcanoes that make up the ring outline where the massive Pacific Plate grinds against other plates that form the Earth’s crust, creating a 25,000-mile long zone prone to earthquakes and other seismic upheaval. Mount Sinabung in Indonesia, pictured above, is one of those volcanoes and spews thick smoke and ash high into the atmosphere almost daily. Sinabung roared back to life in 2010 for the first time in 400 years. After another period of inactivity, it erupted once more in 2013 and has remained highly active since. (Photo: @afpphoto /Ivan Damanik/Getty Images)
- The string of active volcanoes around the Pacific Ocean has lived up to its “Ring of Fire” name lately, sparking mass evacuations in Indonesia and unsettling part of southwestern Japan. The 450 or so volcanoes that make up the ring outline where the massive Pacific Plate grinds against other plates that form the Earth’s crust, creating a 25,000-mile long zone prone to earthquakes and other seismic upheaval. Mount Sinabung in Indonesia, pictured above, is one of those volcanoes and spews thick smoke and ash high into the atmosphere almost daily. Sinabung roared back to life in 2010 for the first time in 400 years. After another period of inactivity, it erupted once more in 2013 and has remained highly active since. (Photo: @afpphoto/Ivan Damanik/Getty Images)
- It’s finally time to unpack your sweaters and fall coats. Summer — which some would say overstayed its welcome — is over. We can safely say an extended period of warm temperatures and such high humidity won’t happen again in Washington this year. After the coolest start to September in 86 years, 16 of 17 days hit at least 80 degrees Sept. 12 to 28 — including three days above 90. Then, 10 of the first 15 days of October hit 75 degrees or higher. Now things are finally starting to cool off. In all, by our criteria, summer lasted just over four months — which is pretty par for the course in recent years in the region. (This 2015 photo in Alexandria, Va. is by John McDonnell/The Washington Post)
- It’s finally time to unpack your sweaters and fall coats. Summer — which some would say overstayed its welcome — is over. We can safely say an extended period of warm temperatures and such high humidity won’t happen again in Washington this year. After the coolest start to September in 86 years, 16 of 17 days hit at least 80 degrees Sept. 12 to 28 — including three days above 90. Then, 10 of the first 15 days of October hit 75 degrees or higher. Now things are finally starting to cool off. In all, by our criteria, summer lasted just over four months — which is pretty par for the course in recent years in the region. (This 2015 photo in Alexandria, Va. is by John McDonnell/The Washington Post)
- It’s finally time to unpack your sweaters and fall coats. Summer — which some would say overstayed its welcome — is over. We can safely say an extended period of warm temperatures and such high humidity won’t happen again in Washington this year. After the coolest start to September in 86 years, 16 of 17 days hit at least 80 degrees Sept. 12 to 28 — including three days above 90. Then, 10 of the first 15 days of October hit 75 degrees or higher. Now things are finally starting to cool off. In all, by our criteria, summer lasted just over four months — which is pretty par for the course in recent years in the region. (This 2015 photo in Alexandria, Va. is by John McDonnell/The Washington Post)
- Thousands more Rohingya Muslims are fleeing large-scale violence and persecution in Myanmar and crossing into Bangladesh, where more than half a million others are already living in squalid and overcrowded camps, according to witnesses and a drone video shot by the U.N. refugee agency. The UNHCR video shows thousands upon thousands of Rohingya trudging along a narrow strip of land alongside what appears to a rain-swollen creek in southern Bangladesh. The line of refugees stretches for a miles. Witnesses say a new wave of refugees started crossing the border over the weekend. Several said that they were stopped by Bangladeshi border guards and spent the night in muddy rice fields. In Geneva on Tuesday, UNHCR spokesman Andrej Mahecic said an estimated 10,000 to 15,000 Rohingya had fled since Sunday night — raising the overall total to 582,000 refugees who have left Myanmar since Aug. 25. #myanmar #rohingya #rohingyamuslims #refugees
- Thousands more Rohingya Muslims are fleeing large-scale violence and persecution in Myanmar and crossing into Bangladesh, where more than half a million others are already living in squalid and overcrowded camps, according to witnesses and a drone video shot by the U.N. refugee agency. The UNHCR video shows thousands upon thousands of Rohingya trudging along a narrow strip of land alongside what appears to a rain-swollen creek in southern Bangladesh. The line of refugees stretches for a miles. Witnesses say a new wave of refugees started crossing the border over the weekend. Several said that they were stopped by Bangladeshi border guards and spent the night in muddy rice fields. In Geneva on Tuesday, UNHCR spokesman Andrej Mahecic said an estimated 10,000 to 15,000 Rohingya had fled since Sunday night — raising the overall total to 582,000 refugees who have left Myanmar since Aug. 25. #myanmar #rohingya #rohingyamuslims #refugees
- Thousands more Rohingya Muslims are fleeing large-scale violence and persecution in Myanmar and crossing into Bangladesh, where more than half a million others are already living in squalid and overcrowded camps, according to witnesses and a drone video shot by the U.N. refugee agency. The UNHCR video shows thousands upon thousands of Rohingya trudging along a narrow strip of land alongside what appears to a rain-swollen creek in southern Bangladesh. The line of refugees stretches for a miles. Witnesses say a new wave of refugees started crossing the border over the weekend. Several said that they were stopped by Bangladeshi border guards and spent the night in muddy rice fields. In Geneva on Tuesday, UNHCR spokesman Andrej Mahecic said an estimated 10,000 to 15,000 Rohingya had fled since Sunday night — raising the overall total to 582,000 refugees who have left Myanmar since Aug. 25. #myanmar #rohingya #rohingyamuslims #refugees
- U.S.-backed forces in Syria claimed full control of the Islamic State’s onetime capital of Raqqa on Tuesday, heralding an end to the militants’ presence in their most symbolically important stronghold and bringing closer the likelihood of their complete territorial demise. Besieged and severely weakened, dozens of militants had launched a final stand from inside Raqqa’s main hospital and stadium. But hundreds of others surrendered during the final days of the battle after local officials brokered a controversial deal that could allow many to escape prosecution. The offensive to recapture the city began in June, with the Syrian Democratic Forces advancing on foot as U.S.-led coalition airstrikes pummeled the militants. Much of the city now lies in ruins, its residents scattered throughout displacement camps across the country. In this photo, a member of the Syrian Democratic Forces is seen in Raqqa, Syria on October 17, 2017. (Photo by Rodi Said/Reuters)
- U.S.-backed forces in Syria claimed full control of the Islamic State’s onetime capital of Raqqa on Tuesday, heralding an end to the militants’ presence in their most symbolically important stronghold and bringing closer the likelihood of their complete territorial demise. Besieged and severely weakened, dozens of militants had launched a final stand from inside Raqqa’s main hospital and stadium. But hundreds of others surrendered during the final days of the battle after local officials brokered a controversial deal that could allow many to escape prosecution. The offensive to recapture the city began in June, with the Syrian Democratic Forces advancing on foot as U.S.-led coalition airstrikes pummeled the militants. Much of the city now lies in ruins, its residents scattered throughout displacement camps across the country. In this photo, a member of the Syrian Democratic Forces is seen in Raqqa, Syria on October 17, 2017. (Photo by Rodi Said/Reuters)
- U.S.-backed forces in Syria claimed full control of the Islamic State’s onetime capital of Raqqa on Tuesday, heralding an end to the militants’ presence in their most symbolically important stronghold and bringing closer the likelihood of their complete territorial demise. Besieged and severely weakened, dozens of militants had launched a final stand from inside Raqqa’s main hospital and stadium. But hundreds of others surrendered during the final days of the battle after local officials brokered a controversial deal that could allow many to escape prosecution. The offensive to recapture the city began in June, with the Syrian Democratic Forces advancing on foot as U.S.-led coalition airstrikes pummeled the militants. Much of the city now lies in ruins, its residents scattered throughout displacement camps across the country. In this photo, a member of the Syrian Democratic Forces is seen in Raqqa, Syria on October 17, 2017. (Photo by Rodi Said/Reuters)
- While firefighters have made gains in containing the more than a dozen fires in Northern California during the past week, the burn risk is still high. The fire’s advance has been steady, despite the gentle wind. As the sun rose Monday, exhausted firefighters changed shifts in a thick, ground-level smoke. California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection officials organized lines as the blaze threatened to roar through windblown canyons. More than 200,000 acres in a cluster of counties north of San Francisco have burned since fires sparked on a blustery night eight days ago. California officials say 41 people have died and more than 3,500 buildings have burned, most of them houses. As firefighters work on the ground, plans like the DC-10 air tanker shown above drop fire retardant in the area. There are signs of progress — but the fire’s stubborn advance highlights the conditions working against its containment: hillsides of oak and pine that are dry as tinder, a rugged topography often unnavigable by large teams and trucks, and a shifting wind that will decide the fate of the valleys regardless of the resources in place now. (Photo: David McNew/Getty Images)
- While firefighters have made gains in containing the more than a dozen fires in Northern California during the past week, the burn risk is still high. The fire’s advance has been steady, despite the gentle wind. As the sun rose Monday, exhausted firefighters changed shifts in a thick, ground-level smoke. California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection officials organized lines as the blaze threatened to roar through windblown canyons. More than 200,000 acres in a cluster of counties north of San Francisco have burned since fires sparked on a blustery night eight days ago. California officials say 41 people have died and more than 3,500 buildings have burned, most of them houses. As firefighters work on the ground, plans like the DC-10 air tanker shown above drop fire retardant in the area. There are signs of progress — but the fire’s stubborn advance highlights the conditions working against its containment: hillsides of oak and pine that are dry as tinder, a rugged topography often unnavigable by large teams and trucks, and a shifting wind that will decide the fate of the valleys regardless of the resources in place now. (Photo: David McNew/Getty Images)
- While firefighters have made gains in containing the more than a dozen fires in Northern California during the past week, the burn risk is still high. The fire’s advance has been steady, despite the gentle wind. As the sun rose Monday, exhausted firefighters changed shifts in a thick, ground-level smoke. California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection officials organized lines as the blaze threatened to roar through windblown canyons. More than 200,000 acres in a cluster of counties north of San Francisco have burned since fires sparked on a blustery night eight days ago. California officials say 41 people have died and more than 3,500 buildings have burned, most of them houses. As firefighters work on the ground, plans like the DC-10 air tanker shown above drop fire retardant in the area. There are signs of progress — but the fire’s stubborn advance highlights the conditions working against its containment: hillsides of oak and pine that are dry as tinder, a rugged topography often unnavigable by large teams and trucks, and a shifting wind that will decide the fate of the valleys regardless of the resources in place now. (Photo: David McNew/Getty Images)
- During an impromptu news conference in the White House Rose Garden on Monday, President Trump was asked why he hadn’t yet made a public comment on the fatalities of four U.S. soldiers who were killed earlier this month in Niger. “I’ve written [the soldiers’ families] personal letters,” Trump replied. “They’ve been sent — or they’re going out tonight but they were written during the weekend.” He then falsely accused his predecessors of not making phone calls to the fallen soldiers: "The traditional way, if you look at President Obama and other presidents, most of them didn’t make calls, a lot of them didn’t make calls. I like to call when it’s appropriate, when I think I’m able to do it." These comments were immediately struck down by veterans of the Obama administration and members of the media who had covered it. The president then admitted that Obama may very well have made calls after all. “I don’t know if he did. No no no. I was told that he didn’t often,” Trump replied. “A lot of presidents don’t; they write letters. I do a combination of both."
- During an impromptu news conference in the White House Rose Garden on Monday, President Trump was asked why he hadn’t yet made a public comment on the fatalities of four U.S. soldiers who were killed earlier this month in Niger. “I’ve written [the soldiers’ families] personal letters,” Trump replied. “They’ve been sent — or they’re going out tonight but they were written during the weekend.” He then falsely accused his predecessors of not making phone calls to the fallen soldiers: "The traditional way, if you look at President Obama and other presidents, most of them didn’t make calls, a lot of them didn’t make calls. I like to call when it’s appropriate, when I think I’m able to do it." These comments were immediately struck down by veterans of the Obama administration and members of the media who had covered it. The president then admitted that Obama may very well have made calls after all. “I don’t know if he did. No no no. I was told that he didn’t often,” Trump replied. “A lot of presidents don’t; they write letters. I do a combination of both."
- During an impromptu news conference in the White House Rose Garden on Monday, President Trump was asked why he hadn’t yet made a public comment on the fatalities of four U.S. soldiers who were killed earlier this month in Niger. “I’ve written [the soldiers’ families] personal letters,” Trump replied. “They’ve been sent — or they’re going out tonight but they were written during the weekend.” He then falsely accused his predecessors of not making phone calls to the fallen soldiers: "The traditional way, if you look at President Obama and other presidents, most of them didn’t make calls, a lot of them didn’t make calls. I like to call when it’s appropriate, when I think I’m able to do it." These comments were immediately struck down by veterans of the Obama administration and members of the media who had covered it. The president then admitted that Obama may very well have made calls after all. “I don’t know if he did. No no no. I was told that he didn’t often,” Trump replied. “A lot of presidents don’t; they write letters. I do a combination of both."

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