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- Bertalisa Sagastume gets choked up as she recalls what happened to her husband. Julio Palma Sr. went into Howard University Hospital having a fever and vomiting -- he is diabetic and didn’t realize a cut on his toe. His son Julio called for the nurse to examine his foot, but says it took them “maybe an hour and a half” to help him before sending him home with a foot wrapped in gauze. That cut soon turned into an infection that ended in multiple amputations. The Post reviewed more than 675 medical malpractice and wrongful-death lawsuits filed since 2006 involving six D.C. hospitals. Of that group, Howard had the highest rate of death lawsuits per bed. Although Palma didn’t die, his family is certain of one thing: His life-altering amputations were “all because of Howard.” For a deeper look into Palma's story and others, please see the link in our bio. (Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post)
- Bertalisa Sagastume gets choked up as she recalls what happened to her husband. Julio Palma Sr. went into Howard University Hospital having a fever and vomiting -- he is diabetic and didn’t realize a cut on his toe. His son Julio called for the nurse to examine his foot, but says it took them “maybe an hour and a half” to help him before sending him home with a foot wrapped in gauze. That cut soon turned into an infection that ended in multiple amputations. The Post reviewed more than 675 medical malpractice and wrongful-death lawsuits filed since 2006 involving six D.C. hospitals. Of that group, Howard had the highest rate of death lawsuits per bed. Although Palma didn’t die, his family is certain of one thing: His life-altering amputations were “all because of Howard.” For a deeper look into Palma& #39;s story and others, please see the link in our bio. (Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post)
- Bertalisa Sagastume gets choked up as she recalls what happened to her husband. Julio Palma Sr. went into Howard University Hospital having a fever and vomiting -- he is diabetic and didn’t realize a cut on his toe. His son Julio called for the nurse to examine his foot, but says it took them “maybe an hour and a half” to help him before sending him home with a foot wrapped in gauze. That cut soon turned into an infection that ended in multiple amputations. The Post reviewed more than 675 medical malpractice and wrongful-death lawsuits filed since 2006 involving six D.C. hospitals. Of that group, Howard had the highest rate of death lawsuits per bed. Although Palma didn’t die, his family is certain of one thing: His life-altering amputations were “all because of Howard.” For a deeper look into Palma's story and others, please see the link in our bio. (Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post)
- Rick Woosley signed up for Kentucky's expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act in the fall of 2013. He begrudgingly submitted to a physical and got a terrifying shock: He had early-stage colon cancer. Surgery soon followed. The story was similar for his wife, Veda, who went about 15 years without a doctor’s visit despite persistent breathing problems. After getting on Medicaid, she was diagnosed with a chronic lung disease and put on a nebulizer. Trump and House Republicans have proposed changing Medicaid to curb federal spending on the program and give more flexibility to states – a change that would affect Rick and Veda. “There’s not anything you can do,” he said. “If they say no, it’s no. It’s the government.” This is just one story of how upending the ACA would affect American families. For more, click the link in our bio. (Luke Sharrett/For The Washington Post)
- Rick Woosley signed up for Kentucky& #39;s expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act in the fall of 2013. He begrudgingly submitted to a physical and got a terrifying shock: He had early-stage colon cancer. Surgery soon followed. The story was similar for his wife, Veda, who went about 15 years without a doctor’s visit despite persistent breathing problems. After getting on Medicaid, she was diagnosed with a chronic lung disease and put on a nebulizer. Trump and House Republicans have proposed changing Medicaid to curb federal spending on the program and give more flexibility to states – a change that would affect Rick and Veda. “There’s not anything you can do,” he said. “If they say no, it’s no. It’s the government.” This is just one story of how upending the ACA would affect American families. For more, click the link in our bio. (Luke Sharrett/For The Washington Post)
- Rick Woosley signed up for Kentucky's expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act in the fall of 2013. He begrudgingly submitted to a physical and got a terrifying shock: He had early-stage colon cancer. Surgery soon followed. The story was similar for his wife, Veda, who went about 15 years without a doctor’s visit despite persistent breathing problems. After getting on Medicaid, she was diagnosed with a chronic lung disease and put on a nebulizer. Trump and House Republicans have proposed changing Medicaid to curb federal spending on the program and give more flexibility to states – a change that would affect Rick and Veda. “There’s not anything you can do,” he said. “If they say no, it’s no. It’s the government.” This is just one story of how upending the ACA would affect American families. For more, click the link in our bio. (Luke Sharrett/For The Washington Post)
- Around 260,000 Afghan refugees – like this mother and her child -- have returned to their homeland from Pakistan over the last 15 months, but it hasn't been an open-armed homecoming. They were pushed out by Pakistani authorities who fear terror attacks. But since many of the returnees are undocumented, they will not receive any assistance from the United Nations. Now, they are forced to find their way in a homeland that doesn’t really feel like home. Click the link in the bio to read more. (Photo by Andrew Quilty/For The Washington Post)
- Around 260,000 Afghan refugees – like this mother and her child -- have returned to their homeland from Pakistan over the last 15 months, but it hasn& #39;t been an open-armed homecoming. They were pushed out by Pakistani authorities who fear terror attacks. But since many of the returnees are undocumented, they will not receive any assistance from the United Nations. Now, they are forced to find their way in a homeland that doesn’t really feel like home. Click the link in the bio to read more. (Photo by Andrew Quilty/For The Washington Post)
- Around 260,000 Afghan refugees – like this mother and her child -- have returned to their homeland from Pakistan over the last 15 months, but it hasn't been an open-armed homecoming. They were pushed out by Pakistani authorities who fear terror attacks. But since many of the returnees are undocumented, they will not receive any assistance from the United Nations. Now, they are forced to find their way in a homeland that doesn’t really feel like home. Click the link in the bio to read more. (Photo by Andrew Quilty/For The Washington Post)
- Photographer Danielle Villasana first met Tamara during the summer of 2013. She was 27 and working in downtown Lima, Peru, as a prostitute. Tamara, like many other transgender women in Lima, didn't have much of a choice in choosing sex work. It quickly becomes their only way to make a living. “I have suffered so much, I don’t understand why we have to suffer so much," she told Villasana. Through all her hardships, however, Tamara never lost her warmth and welcoming personality. Shortly after her 30th birthday, she passed away. These photos capture her life, her struggles and her spirit. For more, see the link in our bio. (Photos by Danielle Villasana @davillasana)
- Photographer Danielle Villasana first met Tamara during the summer of 2013. She was 27 and working in downtown Lima, Peru, as a prostitute. Tamara, like many other transgender women in Lima, didn& #39;t have much of a choice in choosing sex work. It quickly becomes their only way to make a living. “I have suffered so much, I don’t understand why we have to suffer so much," she told Villasana. Through all her hardships, however, Tamara never lost her warmth and welcoming personality. Shortly after her 30th birthday, she passed away. These photos capture her life, her struggles and her spirit. For more, see the link in our bio. (Photos by Danielle Villasana @davillasana )
- Photographer Danielle Villasana first met Tamara during the summer of 2013. She was 27 and working in downtown Lima, Peru, as a prostitute. Tamara, like many other transgender women in Lima, didn't have much of a choice in choosing sex work. It quickly becomes their only way to make a living. “I have suffered so much, I don’t understand why we have to suffer so much," she told Villasana. Through all her hardships, however, Tamara never lost her warmth and welcoming personality. Shortly after her 30th birthday, she passed away. These photos capture her life, her struggles and her spirit. For more, see the link in our bio. (Photos by Danielle Villasana @davillasana)
- Wednesday marks the 6th anniversary of the conflict in Syria -- a conflict that’s left entire cities, families and lives destroyed. But there is a Syria that existed long before the war began. We asked readers to share their memories of what Aleppo was like before the fighting. Here are the images some shared with us. For more of their stories -- or to submit your own -- please see the link in the bio. (The #photography comes from Clara Abi Nader, Greg Swedosh, Sima Moudarres, Stacy Fiorentinos and Bertrand Largeron)
- Wednesday marks the 6th anniversary of the conflict in Syria -- a conflict that’s left entire cities, families and lives destroyed. But there is a Syria that existed long before the war began. We asked readers to share their memories of what Aleppo was like before the fighting. Here are the images some shared with us. For more of their stories -- or to submit your own -- please see the link in the bio. (The #photography comes from Clara Abi Nader, Greg Swedosh, Sima Moudarres, Stacy Fiorentinos and Bertrand Largeron)
- Wednesday marks the 6th anniversary of the conflict in Syria -- a conflict that’s left entire cities, families and lives destroyed. But there is a Syria that existed long before the war began. We asked readers to share their memories of what Aleppo was like before the fighting. Here are the images some shared with us. For more of their stories -- or to submit your own -- please see the link in the bio. (The #photography comes from Clara Abi Nader, Greg Swedosh, Sima Moudarres, Stacy Fiorentinos and Bertrand Largeron)
- “Three years ago, I was leaving for the airport after saying goodbye to my mother. She was dying of cancer. On the long drive across the Alberta prairie, I found myself distracted by flapping remnants of plastic bags. Thinking about mortality, pain and death in the context of my mother’s terminal illness, these forgotten shreds of plastic took on a deeper significance.” Photographer Wes Bell’s “Snag” captures the pain of loss in this simple, yet beautiful photo series. For more images, go to the link in the bio. #photography #art
- “Three years ago, I was leaving for the airport after saying goodbye to my mother. She was dying of cancer. On the long drive across the Alberta prairie, I found myself distracted by flapping remnants of plastic bags. Thinking about mortality, pain and death in the context of my mother’s terminal illness, these forgotten shreds of plastic took on a deeper significance.” Photographer Wes Bell’s “Snag” captures the pain of loss in this simple, yet beautiful photo series. For more images, go to the link in the bio. #photography #art
- “Three years ago, I was leaving for the airport after saying goodbye to my mother. She was dying of cancer. On the long drive across the Alberta prairie, I found myself distracted by flapping remnants of plastic bags. Thinking about mortality, pain and death in the context of my mother’s terminal illness, these forgotten shreds of plastic took on a deeper significance.” Photographer Wes Bell’s “Snag” captures the pain of loss in this simple, yet beautiful photo series. For more images, go to the link in the bio. #photography #art
- “Photography at that time was not only a form of recreation and memory-making for the common person but also a way for them to show everyone else that they aligned with what Chairman Mao and the communist party was promoting.” Photographer Sheila Zhao’s (@chinalostandfound) latest project “The East was Red,” which examines the power and prevalence of political messaging in Chinese photography from the 1960s and 70s. See more of her photos by clicking the link in our bio. #photography #retro #china
- “Photography at that time was not only a form of recreation and memory-making for the common person but also a way for them to show everyone else that they aligned with what Chairman Mao and the communist party was promoting.” Photographer Sheila Zhao’s @chinalostandfound ) latest project “The East was Red,” which examines the power and prevalence of political messaging in Chinese photography from the 1960s and 70s. See more of her photos by clicking the link in our bio. #photography #retro #china
- “Photography at that time was not only a form of recreation and memory-making for the common person but also a way for them to show everyone else that they aligned with what Chairman Mao and the communist party was promoting.” Photographer Sheila Zhao’s (@chinalostandfound) latest project “The East was Red,” which examines the power and prevalence of political messaging in Chinese photography from the 1960s and 70s. See more of her photos by clicking the link in our bio. #photography #retro #china
- Washington Post opinions cartoonist @anntelnaes describes her drawing process in this cartoon about the Jeff Sessions controversy. "Last week I happened to hear an interview of Sen.Ted Cruz where he was asked about Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s conversation with the Russian Ambassador. Cruz dismissively called it a “nothing burger” which of course immediately set off my cartoonist’s visual metaphor antennae. So I picked up my sketchbook to do a quick sketch and jot down names of people from the Trump Administration connected with the Russian government and businesses. I had already read several articles about the subject so I didn’t have to do much more additional research, just some for the caricatures. From there I do larger rough sketches, figuring out the positions and shapes of each individual. After I’m satisfied with the composition I’ll do the final line art and then I’m ready to go to color. " #cartooning #drawing
- Washington Post opinions cartoonist @anntelnaes describes her drawing process in this cartoon about the Jeff Sessions controversy. "Last week I happened to hear an interview of Sen.Ted Cruz where he was asked about Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s conversation with the Russian Ambassador. Cruz dismissively called it a “nothing burger” which of course immediately set off my cartoonist’s visual metaphor antennae. So I picked up my sketchbook to do a quick sketch and jot down names of people from the Trump Administration connected with the Russian government and businesses. I had already read several articles about the subject so I didn’t have to do much more additional research, just some for the caricatures. From there I do larger rough sketches, figuring out the positions and shapes of each individual. After I’m satisfied with the composition I’ll do the final line art and then I’m ready to go to color. " #cartooning #drawing
- Washington Post opinions cartoonist @anntelnaes describes her drawing process in this cartoon about the Jeff Sessions controversy. "Last week I happened to hear an interview of Sen.Ted Cruz where he was asked about Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s conversation with the Russian Ambassador. Cruz dismissively called it a “nothing burger” which of course immediately set off my cartoonist’s visual metaphor antennae. So I picked up my sketchbook to do a quick sketch and jot down names of people from the Trump Administration connected with the Russian government and businesses. I had already read several articles about the subject so I didn’t have to do much more additional research, just some for the caricatures. From there I do larger rough sketches, figuring out the positions and shapes of each individual. After I’m satisfied with the composition I’ll do the final line art and then I’m ready to go to color. " #cartooning #drawing
- On International Women's Day and A Day Without Women, the Democratic female Representatives of U.S. House walked down the east front steps of the U.S. Capitol building and spoke to women's issues still needing to be addressed. Participating was House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), who encouraged more women to run for office, saying “nothing is more wholesome to the political process.” She said empowerment for young girls often begins with education. “People would say to me ‘if you ruled the world, what one thing would you do to make the future better?’ That’s an easy answer: The education of girls.” The multifaceted day of protest started with organizers of the post-Inauguration Day women’s marches that drew millions around the world. Organizers called for women and their allies to come together for a “one-day demonstration of economic solidarity.” Women who couldn’t join the strike were urged to participate by wearing red — a color that symbolizes “revolutionary love and sacrifice,” organizers said — and spending money at small and women-owned businesses (Photo by @melinamara/@washpostphoto) #InternationalWomensDay #ADayWithoutWomen #women #woman #solidarity #march #red #color #teacher #teachers #strike
- On International Women& #39;s Day and A Day Without Women, the Democratic female Representatives of U.S. House walked down the east front steps of the U.S. Capitol building and spoke to women& #39;s issues still needing to be addressed. Participating was House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), who encouraged more women to run for office, saying “nothing is more wholesome to the political process.” She said empowerment for young girls often begins with education. “People would say to me ‘if you ruled the world, what one thing would you do to make the future better?’ That’s an easy answer: The education of girls.” The multifaceted day of protest started with organizers of the post-Inauguration Day women’s marches that drew millions around the world. Organizers called for women and their allies to come together for a “one-day demonstration of economic solidarity.” Women who couldn’t join the strike were urged to participate by wearing red — a color that symbolizes “revolutionary love and sacrifice,” organizers said — and spending money at small and women-owned businesses (Photo by @melinamara @washpostphoto ) #InternationalWomensDay #ADayWithoutWomen #women #woman #solidarity #march #red #color #teacher #teachers #strike
- On International Women's Day and A Day Without Women, the Democratic female Representatives of U.S. House walked down the east front steps of the U.S. Capitol building and spoke to women's issues still needing to be addressed. Participating was House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), who encouraged more women to run for office, saying “nothing is more wholesome to the political process.” She said empowerment for young girls often begins with education. “People would say to me ‘if you ruled the world, what one thing would you do to make the future better?’ That’s an easy answer: The education of girls.” The multifaceted day of protest started with organizers of the post-Inauguration Day women’s marches that drew millions around the world. Organizers called for women and their allies to come together for a “one-day demonstration of economic solidarity.” Women who couldn’t join the strike were urged to participate by wearing red — a color that symbolizes “revolutionary love and sacrifice,” organizers said — and spending money at small and women-owned businesses (Photo by @melinamara/@washpostphoto) #InternationalWomensDay #ADayWithoutWomen #women #woman #solidarity #march #red #color #teacher #teachers #strike

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