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- The electric guitar is slowly dying, and few have noticed. George Gruhn, a 71-year-old Nashville dealer who has sold guitars to Eric Clapton, Neil Young, Paul McCartney and Taylor Swift, has seen the storm coming for a while. “There are more makers now than ever before in the history of the instrument, but the market is not growing,” Gruhn says in a voice that flutters between a groan and a grumble. “I’m not all doomsday, but this — this is not sustainable.” Watch our Instagram story for more. (Video: Erin O’Connor / The Washington Post filmed with assistance from the Arlington County Fire Department)
- The electric guitar is slowly dying, and few have noticed. George Gruhn, a 71-year-old Nashville dealer who has sold guitars to Eric Clapton, Neil Young, Paul McCartney and Taylor Swift, has seen the storm coming for a while. “There are more makers now than ever before in the history of the instrument, but the market is not growing,” Gruhn says in a voice that flutters between a groan and a grumble. “I’m not all doomsday, but this — this is not sustainable.” Watch our Instagram story for more. (Video: Erin O’Connor / The Washington Post filmed with assistance from the Arlington County Fire Department)
- The electric guitar is slowly dying, and few have noticed. George Gruhn, a 71-year-old Nashville dealer who has sold guitars to Eric Clapton, Neil Young, Paul McCartney and Taylor Swift, has seen the storm coming for a while. “There are more makers now than ever before in the history of the instrument, but the market is not growing,” Gruhn says in a voice that flutters between a groan and a grumble. “I’m not all doomsday, but this — this is not sustainable.” Watch our Instagram story for more. (Video: Erin O’Connor / The Washington Post filmed with assistance from the Arlington County Fire Department)
- Reece Whitley would love for it to be otherwise, for the notion of an African American swimmer to be a norm instead of a novelty. The sport simply isn’t there yet. Elite-level swimming success for blacks in the United States has a short history, but the 17-year-old may just change that. When Whitley is invariably asked about his potential impact on swimming because of his skin color he has the patience to answer, “Right now it’s a relevant question, so I don’t take any shame in answering it. At the end of my career, if I look back on it and that question is irrelevant, then that means I would have fulfilled my goals.” (Photo: Jonathan Newton/The Washington Post)
- Reece Whitley would love for it to be otherwise, for the notion of an African American swimmer to be a norm instead of a novelty. The sport simply isn’t there yet. Elite-level swimming success for blacks in the United States has a short history, but the 17-year-old may just change that. When Whitley is invariably asked about his potential impact on swimming because of his skin color he has the patience to answer, “Right now it’s a relevant question, so I don’t take any shame in answering it. At the end of my career, if I look back on it and that question is irrelevant, then that means I would have fulfilled my goals.” (Photo: Jonathan Newton/The Washington Post)
- Reece Whitley would love for it to be otherwise, for the notion of an African American swimmer to be a norm instead of a novelty. The sport simply isn’t there yet. Elite-level swimming success for blacks in the United States has a short history, but the 17-year-old may just change that. When Whitley is invariably asked about his potential impact on swimming because of his skin color he has the patience to answer, “Right now it’s a relevant question, so I don’t take any shame in answering it. At the end of my career, if I look back on it and that question is irrelevant, then that means I would have fulfilled my goals.” (Photo: Jonathan Newton/The Washington Post)
- One of these Time Magazine covers is real – and the other hangs in at least four of President Trump’s golf clubs. The fake one, as confirmed by Time Inc., features Trump and is riddled with clues to its inauthencity. Side-by-side, you can spot the differences between the two "published" in March 2009. The question is: why does the fake exist in the first place? Read David Fahrenthold's latest piece on this curious cover in the link in our bio. (Photo on the left: Time. Photo on the right: Angel Valentin for The Washington Post)
- One of these Time Magazine covers is real – and the other hangs in at least four of President Trump’s golf clubs. The fake one, as confirmed by Time Inc., features Trump and is riddled with clues to its inauthencity. Side-by-side, you can spot the differences between the two "published" in March 2009. The question is: why does the fake exist in the first place? Read David Fahrenthold& #39;s latest piece on this curious cover in the link in our bio. (Photo on the left: Time. Photo on the right: Angel Valentin for The Washington Post)
- One of these Time Magazine covers is real – and the other hangs in at least four of President Trump’s golf clubs. The fake one, as confirmed by Time Inc., features Trump and is riddled with clues to its inauthencity. Side-by-side, you can spot the differences between the two "published" in March 2009. The question is: why does the fake exist in the first place? Read David Fahrenthold's latest piece on this curious cover in the link in our bio. (Photo on the left: Time. Photo on the right: Angel Valentin for The Washington Post)
- They eat human flesh. They sometimes smear human ashes over their bodies. Occasionally they consume their own excrement. These are the Aghor, a small sect of Hinduism that live in the holy Indian city of Varanasi. Although they are often branded as deranged due to their practices, their religion goes deeper than their flesh-eating habits. “They are people that have so much love and respect for people, animals and nature … it’s just as beautiful as any other religion is,” said Tamara Merino who spent a month with the Aghor, photographing their day to day life. To learn more, check out the link in our profile. (Photo: Tamara Merino).
- They eat human flesh. They sometimes smear human ashes over their bodies. Occasionally they consume their own excrement. These are the Aghor, a small sect of Hinduism that live in the holy Indian city of Varanasi. Although they are often branded as deranged due to their practices, their religion goes deeper than their flesh-eating habits. “They are people that have so much love and respect for people, animals and nature … it’s just as beautiful as any other religion is,” said Tamara Merino who spent a month with the Aghor, photographing their day to day life. To learn more, check out the link in our profile. (Photo: Tamara Merino).
- They eat human flesh. They sometimes smear human ashes over their bodies. Occasionally they consume their own excrement. These are the Aghor, a small sect of Hinduism that live in the holy Indian city of Varanasi. Although they are often branded as deranged due to their practices, their religion goes deeper than their flesh-eating habits. “They are people that have so much love and respect for people, animals and nature … it’s just as beautiful as any other religion is,” said Tamara Merino who spent a month with the Aghor, photographing their day to day life. To learn more, check out the link in our profile. (Photo: Tamara Merino).
- Afghanistan has a drug problem – and it's one greatly affecting women. “It is a silent tsunami, and if it is not controlled, in another few years it will be a disaster,” says Shaista Hakim, a drug treatment specialist in Kabul. So, why the influx? Among a few reasons, many times it goes back to living with men who are addicts. Sometimes it trickles down to the family’s children, too. For more on the addiction crisis facing Afghanistan, click the link in our bio. (Photo: Andrew Quilty/For The Washington Post)
- Afghanistan has a drug problem – and it& #39;s one greatly affecting women. “It is a silent tsunami, and if it is not controlled, in another few years it will be a disaster,” says Shaista Hakim, a drug treatment specialist in Kabul. So, why the influx? Among a few reasons, many times it goes back to living with men who are addicts. Sometimes it trickles down to the family’s children, too. For more on the addiction crisis facing Afghanistan, click the link in our bio. (Photo: Andrew Quilty/For The Washington Post)
- Afghanistan has a drug problem – and it's one greatly affecting women. “It is a silent tsunami, and if it is not controlled, in another few years it will be a disaster,” says Shaista Hakim, a drug treatment specialist in Kabul. So, why the influx? Among a few reasons, many times it goes back to living with men who are addicts. Sometimes it trickles down to the family’s children, too. For more on the addiction crisis facing Afghanistan, click the link in our bio. (Photo: Andrew Quilty/For The Washington Post)
- Meagan Beckermann and her son Trevor, 7, live only a couple of miles from West Lake, a contaminated landfill that contains thousands of tons of waste from the World War II-era Manhattan Project. For decades, the EPA vowed to clean up the site and now its new director, Scott Pruitt, promises to follow through. Pregnant with her third child, Beckermann wonders if she should leave the area to escape potential health risks – like the ones she thinks might have caused Trevor’s Alopecia Areata -- or stay and wait for it to be cleaned. Read more about West Lake through the link in our bio. (Photo: Linda Davidson/The Washington Post)
- Meagan Beckermann and her son Trevor, 7, live only a couple of miles from West Lake, a contaminated landfill that contains thousands of tons of waste from the World War II-era Manhattan Project. For decades, the EPA vowed to clean up the site and now its new director, Scott Pruitt, promises to follow through. Pregnant with her third child, Beckermann wonders if she should leave the area to escape potential health risks – like the ones she thinks might have caused Trevor’s Alopecia Areata -- or stay and wait for it to be cleaned. Read more about West Lake through the link in our bio. (Photo: Linda Davidson/The Washington Post)
- Meagan Beckermann and her son Trevor, 7, live only a couple of miles from West Lake, a contaminated landfill that contains thousands of tons of waste from the World War II-era Manhattan Project. For decades, the EPA vowed to clean up the site and now its new director, Scott Pruitt, promises to follow through. Pregnant with her third child, Beckermann wonders if she should leave the area to escape potential health risks – like the ones she thinks might have caused Trevor’s Alopecia Areata -- or stay and wait for it to be cleaned. Read more about West Lake through the link in our bio. (Photo: Linda Davidson/The Washington Post)
- Members of MS-13, the only street gang that federal authorities have labeled a transnational criminal organization, live by its sinister motto: kill, rape, control. In the D.C. area alone, at least 15 killings have been tied to the gang as it continues to become a flash point in the nation’s debate over immigration. It’s latest push: targeting teenage immigrants. Ones like Porfirio Baires’ (pictured) 16-year-old nephew Danny, who was killed after moving to Northern Virginia and getting reacquainted with the gang he left behind in El Salvador. Read more on his family story through the link in our bio. (Photo: J. Lawler Duggan/For The Washington Post)
- Members of MS-13, the only street gang that federal authorities have labeled a transnational criminal organization, live by its sinister motto: kill, rape, control. In the D.C. area alone, at least 15 killings have been tied to the gang as it continues to become a flash point in the nation’s debate over immigration. It’s latest push: targeting teenage immigrants. Ones like Porfirio Baires’ (pictured) 16-year-old nephew Danny, who was killed after moving to Northern Virginia and getting reacquainted with the gang he left behind in El Salvador. Read more on his family story through the link in our bio. (Photo: J. Lawler Duggan/For The Washington Post)
- Members of MS-13, the only street gang that federal authorities have labeled a transnational criminal organization, live by its sinister motto: kill, rape, control. In the D.C. area alone, at least 15 killings have been tied to the gang as it continues to become a flash point in the nation’s debate over immigration. It’s latest push: targeting teenage immigrants. Ones like Porfirio Baires’ (pictured) 16-year-old nephew Danny, who was killed after moving to Northern Virginia and getting reacquainted with the gang he left behind in El Salvador. Read more on his family story through the link in our bio. (Photo: J. Lawler Duggan/For The Washington Post)
- After decades of lawsuits, public campaigns and painful struggles, Americans have finally done what once seemed impossible: Most of the country has quit smoking. Hidden among the steady declines, however, is the stark reality that cigarettes are becoming a habit of the poor, the less educated and those who live in rural areas -- areas like Martinsville, Va., where Victoria Cassell calls home. “It was like losing my best friend,” Cassell, pictured, said when she tried to last quit smoking. “My cigarettes have kept me company for 40 years, longer than just about anyone in my life.” Click the link in the bio to learn more about America’s tobacco crisis. (Photo: Jay Westcott/For The Washington Post)
- After decades of lawsuits, public campaigns and painful struggles, Americans have finally done what once seemed impossible: Most of the country has quit smoking. Hidden among the steady declines, however, is the stark reality that cigarettes are becoming a habit of the poor, the less educated and those who live in rural areas -- areas like Martinsville, Va., where Victoria Cassell calls home. “It was like losing my best friend,” Cassell, pictured, said when she tried to last quit smoking. “My cigarettes have kept me company for 40 years, longer than just about anyone in my life.” Click the link in the bio to learn more about America’s tobacco crisis. (Photo: Jay Westcott/For The Washington Post)
- After decades of lawsuits, public campaigns and painful struggles, Americans have finally done what once seemed impossible: Most of the country has quit smoking. Hidden among the steady declines, however, is the stark reality that cigarettes are becoming a habit of the poor, the less educated and those who live in rural areas -- areas like Martinsville, Va., where Victoria Cassell calls home. “It was like losing my best friend,” Cassell, pictured, said when she tried to last quit smoking. “My cigarettes have kept me company for 40 years, longer than just about anyone in my life.” Click the link in the bio to learn more about America’s tobacco crisis. (Photo: Jay Westcott/For The Washington Post)

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