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- Three words: Roasted Gingery Pears. If you're looking for something new to try this holiday season that can be made for multiple types of meals, these pears are a great option. This incredibly flexible dish can provide something for everyone, no matter their dietary restrictions. They can be served with ice cream to create a decadent dessert, or with unsweetened whipped cream for a low-carb treat, or even just on their own for something festive, comforting and free from consequences. For more culinary inspiration follow @wapofood! And check out the link in our bio for the full recipe. (Photo by Deb Lindsey For The Washington Post)
- Three words: Roasted Gingery Pears. If you& #39;re looking for something new to try this holiday season that can be made for multiple types of meals, these pears are a great option. This incredibly flexible dish can provide something for everyone, no matter their dietary restrictions. They can be served with ice cream to create a decadent dessert, or with unsweetened whipped cream for a low-carb treat, or even just on their own for something festive, comforting and free from consequences. For more culinary inspiration follow @wapofood ! And check out the link in our bio for the full recipe. (Photo by Deb Lindsey For The Washington Post)
- Three words: Roasted Gingery Pears. If you're looking for something new to try this holiday season that can be made for multiple types of meals, these pears are a great option. This incredibly flexible dish can provide something for everyone, no matter their dietary restrictions. They can be served with ice cream to create a decadent dessert, or with unsweetened whipped cream for a low-carb treat, or even just on their own for something festive, comforting and free from consequences. For more culinary inspiration follow @wapofood! And check out the link in our bio for the full recipe. (Photo by Deb Lindsey For The Washington Post)
- Last night Kayla Moore, the wife of Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, decided to try and clear up past accusations that her husband was anti-Semitic, while also pounding “fake news” reporters crowded in the audience at a rally on the final night of Moore's campaign. “Fake news,” she said, “would tell you that we don’t care for Jews. I tell you all this because I’ve seen it all and I just want to set the record straight while they’re all here.” After a brief pause, for effect, she said, “One of our attorneys is a Jew. We have very close friends that are Jewish and rabbis and we also fellowship with them.” The comment immediately blew up online and fueled scores of stories with headlines like “Moore’s wife denies claims of anti-Semitism” and “Roy Moore battles bigotry claims on eve of Alabama vote,” all of which included the words “One of our attorneys is a Jew.” Twitter also went wild. In fact, the social media site did not list Roy Moore as trending overnight at all. But Kayla Moore dominated in two categories: “Kayla Moore” and “One of Our Attorneys Is A Jew.”
- Last night Kayla Moore, the wife of Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, decided to try and clear up past accusations that her husband was anti-Semitic, while also pounding “fake news” reporters crowded in the audience at a rally on the final night of Moore& #39;s campaign. “Fake news,” she said, “would tell you that we don’t care for Jews. I tell you all this because I’ve seen it all and I just want to set the record straight while they’re all here.” After a brief pause, for effect, she said, “One of our attorneys is a Jew. We have very close friends that are Jewish and rabbis and we also fellowship with them.” The comment immediately blew up online and fueled scores of stories with headlines like “Moore’s wife denies claims of anti-Semitism” and “Roy Moore battles bigotry claims on eve of Alabama vote,” all of which included the words “One of our attorneys is a Jew.” Twitter also went wild. In fact, the social media site did not list Roy Moore as trending overnight at all. But Kayla Moore dominated in two categories: “Kayla Moore” and “One of Our Attorneys Is A Jew.”
- Last night Kayla Moore, the wife of Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, decided to try and clear up past accusations that her husband was anti-Semitic, while also pounding “fake news” reporters crowded in the audience at a rally on the final night of Moore's campaign. “Fake news,” she said, “would tell you that we don’t care for Jews. I tell you all this because I’ve seen it all and I just want to set the record straight while they’re all here.” After a brief pause, for effect, she said, “One of our attorneys is a Jew. We have very close friends that are Jewish and rabbis and we also fellowship with them.” The comment immediately blew up online and fueled scores of stories with headlines like “Moore’s wife denies claims of anti-Semitism” and “Roy Moore battles bigotry claims on eve of Alabama vote,” all of which included the words “One of our attorneys is a Jew.” Twitter also went wild. In fact, the social media site did not list Roy Moore as trending overnight at all. But Kayla Moore dominated in two categories: “Kayla Moore” and “One of Our Attorneys Is A Jew.”
- Flowers are seen placed on the carcass of an elephant, who according to forest officials was electrocuted early morning in a paddy field at Kuruabahi village, in Nagaon district in the northeastern state of Assam, India, on December 12, 2017. More than 60 percent of the world’s Asian elephants live in India as its human population balloons, spreading into migration routes and feeding grounds the animals have used for centuries. There may have once been more than a million elephants in India, before a human population explosion in the 20th century drastically reduced their numbers. Still, there are sustainable populations that are thriving alongside humans, but it’s far from a peaceful coexistence. Photo by Anuwar Hazarika—@reuters
- Flowers are seen placed on the carcass of an elephant, who according to forest officials was electrocuted early morning in a paddy field at Kuruabahi village, in Nagaon district in the northeastern state of Assam, India, on December 12, 2017. More than 60 percent of the world’s Asian elephants live in India as its human population balloons, spreading into migration routes and feeding grounds the animals have used for centuries. There may have once been more than a million elephants in India, before a human population explosion in the 20th century drastically reduced their numbers. Still, there are sustainable populations that are thriving alongside humans, but it’s far from a peaceful coexistence. Photo by Anuwar Hazarika @reuters
- Flowers are seen placed on the carcass of an elephant, who according to forest officials was electrocuted early morning in a paddy field at Kuruabahi village, in Nagaon district in the northeastern state of Assam, India, on December 12, 2017. More than 60 percent of the world’s Asian elephants live in India as its human population balloons, spreading into migration routes and feeding grounds the animals have used for centuries. There may have once been more than a million elephants in India, before a human population explosion in the 20th century drastically reduced their numbers. Still, there are sustainable populations that are thriving alongside humans, but it’s far from a peaceful coexistence. Photo by Anuwar Hazarika—@reuters
- Speaking at the White House on Monday, President Trump offered high ambitions, but few specifics in signing a new space policy directive that had no timeline and promised no funding for future missions. With Apollo astronaut Harrison "Jack" Schmitt in attendance on the 45th anniversary of Apollo 17’s landing on the moon, Trump said NASA would not only return to the moon, but use it as a stepping stone to explore even deeper into the cosmos. “The directive I’m signing today will refocus America’s space program on human exploration and discovery,” he said. “It marks an important step in returning American astronauts to the moon for the first time since 1972 for long-term exploration and use." Photo by Carlos Barria—@reuters
- Speaking at the White House on Monday, President Trump offered high ambitions, but few specifics in signing a new space policy directive that had no timeline and promised no funding for future missions. With Apollo astronaut Harrison "Jack" Schmitt in attendance on the 45th anniversary of Apollo 17’s landing on the moon, Trump said NASA would not only return to the moon, but use it as a stepping stone to explore even deeper into the cosmos. “The directive I’m signing today will refocus America’s space program on human exploration and discovery,” he said. “It marks an important step in returning American astronauts to the moon for the first time since 1972 for long-term exploration and use." Photo by Carlos Barria @reuters
- Speaking at the White House on Monday, President Trump offered high ambitions, but few specifics in signing a new space policy directive that had no timeline and promised no funding for future missions. With Apollo astronaut Harrison "Jack" Schmitt in attendance on the 45th anniversary of Apollo 17’s landing on the moon, Trump said NASA would not only return to the moon, but use it as a stepping stone to explore even deeper into the cosmos. “The directive I’m signing today will refocus America’s space program on human exploration and discovery,” he said. “It marks an important step in returning American astronauts to the moon for the first time since 1972 for long-term exploration and use." Photo by Carlos Barria—@reuters
- Few people risked more to chronicle the civil rights movement than Simeon Booker, the longtime journalist who was the Washington bureau chief of Jet and Ebony magazines for five decades and the first full-time black reporter at The Washington Post. Booker died on died Dec. 10 at an assisted-living community in Solomons, Md at 99. From home bases in Chicago and later in Washington, Booker ventured into the South and sent back dispatches that reached black readers across the United States. Most notably, he helped deliver the story of Emmett Till, a young man whose murder in 1955 became the most infamous of the thousands of lynchings brought upon African Americans in the Jim Crow South. “I wanted to fight segregation on the front lines,” he once said. “I wanted to dedicate my writing skills to the cause. Segregation was beating down my people. I volunteered for every assignment and suggested more. I stayed on the road, covering civil rights day and night. The names, the places and the events became history.” Above, Booker is seen during an interview in Washington on December 21, 1982. Photo by Fred Sweets—@washingtonpost
- Few people risked more to chronicle the civil rights movement than Simeon Booker, the longtime journalist who was the Washington bureau chief of Jet and Ebony magazines for five decades and the first full-time black reporter at The Washington Post. Booker died on died Dec. 10 at an assisted-living community in Solomons, Md at 99. From home bases in Chicago and later in Washington, Booker ventured into the South and sent back dispatches that reached black readers across the United States. Most notably, he helped deliver the story of Emmett Till, a young man whose murder in 1955 became the most infamous of the thousands of lynchings brought upon African Americans in the Jim Crow South. “I wanted to fight segregation on the front lines,” he once said. “I wanted to dedicate my writing skills to the cause. Segregation was beating down my people. I volunteered for every assignment and suggested more. I stayed on the road, covering civil rights day and night. The names, the places and the events became history.” Above, Booker is seen during an interview in Washington on December 21, 1982. Photo by Fred Sweets @washingtonpost
- Few people risked more to chronicle the civil rights movement than Simeon Booker, the longtime journalist who was the Washington bureau chief of Jet and Ebony magazines for five decades and the first full-time black reporter at The Washington Post. Booker died on died Dec. 10 at an assisted-living community in Solomons, Md at 99. From home bases in Chicago and later in Washington, Booker ventured into the South and sent back dispatches that reached black readers across the United States. Most notably, he helped deliver the story of Emmett Till, a young man whose murder in 1955 became the most infamous of the thousands of lynchings brought upon African Americans in the Jim Crow South. “I wanted to fight segregation on the front lines,” he once said. “I wanted to dedicate my writing skills to the cause. Segregation was beating down my people. I volunteered for every assignment and suggested more. I stayed on the road, covering civil rights day and night. The names, the places and the events became history.” Above, Booker is seen during an interview in Washington on December 21, 1982. Photo by Fred Sweets—@washingtonpost
- New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speak at a press conference as police respond to a reported explosion at the Port Authority Bus Terminal on December 11, 2017 in New York. Authorities said a low-tech device was detonated in the New York City subway in an incident that de Blasio called “an attempted terrorist attack.” The man suspected of setting off the explosion was identified by authorities as 27-year-old Akayed Ullah, described as an immigrant from Bangladesh. The blast, which occurred at 42nd Street and 8th Avenue, resulted in serious injuries to the suspect and minor injuries to at least three others, authorities said during the news conference. Photo by Bryan R. Smith—@afpphoto/@gettyimages
- New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speak at a press conference as police respond to a reported explosion at the Port Authority Bus Terminal on December 11, 2017 in New York. Authorities said a low-tech device was detonated in the New York City subway in an incident that de Blasio called “an attempted terrorist attack.” The man suspected of setting off the explosion was identified by authorities as 27-year-old Akayed Ullah, described as an immigrant from Bangladesh. The blast, which occurred at 42nd Street and 8th Avenue, resulted in serious injuries to the suspect and minor injuries to at least three others, authorities said during the news conference. Photo by Bryan R. Smith @afpphoto @gettyimages
- New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speak at a press conference as police respond to a reported explosion at the Port Authority Bus Terminal on December 11, 2017 in New York. Authorities said a low-tech device was detonated in the New York City subway in an incident that de Blasio called “an attempted terrorist attack.” The man suspected of setting off the explosion was identified by authorities as 27-year-old Akayed Ullah, described as an immigrant from Bangladesh. The blast, which occurred at 42nd Street and 8th Avenue, resulted in serious injuries to the suspect and minor injuries to at least three others, authorities said during the news conference. Photo by Bryan R. Smith—@afpphoto/@gettyimages
- Lebanese security forces over the weekend clashed with demonstrators near the U.S. Embassy in Beirut as hundreds protested President Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the Israeli capital. The Lebanese army fired water cannons and tear gas as youths hurled stones and burned effigies of Trump and American flags. Hundreds attended the protest on the edge of Beirut, many wrapped in Palestinian scarves and flags. In this photo taken by @leloveluck, Fatima, 6, and Ali, 4, watch from the sidewalk at a separate protest by the Lebanese Hezbollah movement.
- Lebanese security forces over the weekend clashed with demonstrators near the U.S. Embassy in Beirut as hundreds protested President Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the Israeli capital. The Lebanese army fired water cannons and tear gas as youths hurled stones and burned effigies of Trump and American flags. Hundreds attended the protest on the edge of Beirut, many wrapped in Palestinian scarves and flags. In this photo taken by @leloveluck , Fatima, 6, and Ali, 4, watch from the sidewalk at a separate protest by the Lebanese Hezbollah movement.
- Lebanese security forces over the weekend clashed with demonstrators near the U.S. Embassy in Beirut as hundreds protested President Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the Israeli capital. The Lebanese army fired water cannons and tear gas as youths hurled stones and burned effigies of Trump and American flags. Hundreds attended the protest on the edge of Beirut, many wrapped in Palestinian scarves and flags. In this photo taken by @leloveluck, Fatima, 6, and Ali, 4, watch from the sidewalk at a separate protest by the Lebanese Hezbollah movement.
- Raging wildfires continued to burn through Southern California on Sunday, stretching into a second week as authorities warned that the blazes could still spread and pose new dangers. The fires have been blamed for one death, and the flames have destroyed more than 800 buildings and threatened thousands more. Officials have stressed that the weather could trigger still more hazards. Much of Los Angeles and Ventura counties were under “red flag warnings” of increased fire risk through Sunday evening as the winds that fanned the flames were expected to strengthen. Any new blaze could see a “very rapid spread of wildfire … and extreme fire behavior that could lead to a threat to life and property,” according the National Weather Service. Photo by Stuart Palley for The Washington Post
- Raging wildfires continued to burn through Southern California on Sunday, stretching into a second week as authorities warned that the blazes could still spread and pose new dangers. The fires have been blamed for one death, and the flames have destroyed more than 800 buildings and threatened thousands more. Officials have stressed that the weather could trigger still more hazards. Much of Los Angeles and Ventura counties were under “red flag warnings” of increased fire risk through Sunday evening as the winds that fanned the flames were expected to strengthen. Any new blaze could see a “very rapid spread of wildfire … and extreme fire behavior that could lead to a threat to life and property,” according the National Weather Service. Photo by Stuart Palley for The Washington Post
- Raging wildfires continued to burn through Southern California on Sunday, stretching into a second week as authorities warned that the blazes could still spread and pose new dangers. The fires have been blamed for one death, and the flames have destroyed more than 800 buildings and threatened thousands more. Officials have stressed that the weather could trigger still more hazards. Much of Los Angeles and Ventura counties were under “red flag warnings” of increased fire risk through Sunday evening as the winds that fanned the flames were expected to strengthen. Any new blaze could see a “very rapid spread of wildfire … and extreme fire behavior that could lead to a threat to life and property,” according the National Weather Service. Photo by Stuart Palley for The Washington Post
- President Donald Trump gets a tour of the newly-opened Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson, Miss., Saturday, Dec. 9, 2017. Before the tour, President Trump addressed an invitation-only gathering at the museum in Jackson, instead of attending the opening ceremony. The change in plans came after Trump’s plans to attend the opening of the museum, which honors civil rights martyrs, drew criticism from those who marched in the movement. Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), who marched alongside Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and was scheduled to deliver the keynote address at the opening, announced Thursday that he would boycott the stage at the public event if Trump were on it. Others called on Trump to change his plans and not attend the opening. Lewis and other black leaders said the president's actions and statements since taking office were in exact opposition of the values of the civil rights leaders the museum was intended to honor. Photo by Susan Walsh—AP Photo
- President Donald Trump gets a tour of the newly-opened Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson, Miss., Saturday, Dec. 9, 2017. Before the tour, President Trump addressed an invitation-only gathering at the museum in Jackson, instead of attending the opening ceremony. The change in plans came after Trump’s plans to attend the opening of the museum, which honors civil rights martyrs, drew criticism from those who marched in the movement. Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), who marched alongside Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and was scheduled to deliver the keynote address at the opening, announced Thursday that he would boycott the stage at the public event if Trump were on it. Others called on Trump to change his plans and not attend the opening. Lewis and other black leaders said the president& #39;s actions and statements since taking office were in exact opposition of the values of the civil rights leaders the museum was intended to honor. Photo by Susan Walsh—AP Photo
- President Donald Trump gets a tour of the newly-opened Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson, Miss., Saturday, Dec. 9, 2017. Before the tour, President Trump addressed an invitation-only gathering at the museum in Jackson, instead of attending the opening ceremony. The change in plans came after Trump’s plans to attend the opening of the museum, which honors civil rights martyrs, drew criticism from those who marched in the movement. Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), who marched alongside Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and was scheduled to deliver the keynote address at the opening, announced Thursday that he would boycott the stage at the public event if Trump were on it. Others called on Trump to change his plans and not attend the opening. Lewis and other black leaders said the president's actions and statements since taking office were in exact opposition of the values of the civil rights leaders the museum was intended to honor. Photo by Susan Walsh—AP Photo
- On Saturday, multiple wildfires continued to rage throughout Southern California, cloaking the area in nightmarish flame and towering plumes of smoke so thick they were visible from space. As a result, authorities reported the first fire-related death. The Ventura Medical Examiner Office identified a body found on Wednesday as Virginia Pesola, 70, from Santa Paula, the “only confirmed fire-related death in Ventura County to date.” Pesola had died from “blunt force injuries with terminal smoke inhalation and thermal injuries” in a traffic incident during “active fire evacuation.” As the fires spread, much of the region also faces the threat posed by the dense smoke. Above, the Thomas Fire is seen burning in the Los Padres National Forrest near Ojai, Calif. on December 9 2017. Photo by Stuart Palley for The Washington Post
- On Saturday, multiple wildfires continued to rage throughout Southern California, cloaking the area in nightmarish flame and towering plumes of smoke so thick they were visible from space. As a result, authorities reported the first fire-related death. The Ventura Medical Examiner Office identified a body found on Wednesday as Virginia Pesola, 70, from Santa Paula, the “only confirmed fire-related death in Ventura County to date.” Pesola had died from “blunt force injuries with terminal smoke inhalation and thermal injuries” in a traffic incident during “active fire evacuation.” As the fires spread, much of the region also faces the threat posed by the dense smoke. Above, the Thomas Fire is seen burning in the Los Padres National Forrest near Ojai, Calif. on December 9 2017. Photo by Stuart Palley for The Washington Post
- On Saturday, multiple wildfires continued to rage throughout Southern California, cloaking the area in nightmarish flame and towering plumes of smoke so thick they were visible from space. As a result, authorities reported the first fire-related death. The Ventura Medical Examiner Office identified a body found on Wednesday as Virginia Pesola, 70, from Santa Paula, the “only confirmed fire-related death in Ventura County to date.” Pesola had died from “blunt force injuries with terminal smoke inhalation and thermal injuries” in a traffic incident during “active fire evacuation.” As the fires spread, much of the region also faces the threat posed by the dense smoke. Above, the Thomas Fire is seen burning in the Los Padres National Forrest near Ojai, Calif. on December 9 2017. Photo by Stuart Palley for The Washington Post
- On Friday, President Trump went down South to urge nearby Alabama voters to send Roy Moore, a man accused of making sexual advances on teenagers, to the U.S. Senate. "We want jobs, jobs, jobs. So get out and vote for Roy Moore. Do it. Do it. Do it," Trump said. He kept his distance at first, but Trump, who is facing his own allegations of sexual misconduct and harassment from more than a dozen women, soon made clear that he doubts Moore's accusers and that he'd rather have a Republican in the Senate than a Democrat. The president is still incredibly popular in Alabama, so what he says about Moore and his accusers matters. Photo by Kevin Lamarque—@reuters
- On Friday, President Trump went down South to urge nearby Alabama voters to send Roy Moore, a man accused of making sexual advances on teenagers, to the U.S. Senate. "We want jobs, jobs, jobs. So get out and vote for Roy Moore. Do it. Do it. Do it," Trump said. He kept his distance at first, but Trump, who is facing his own allegations of sexual misconduct and harassment from more than a dozen women, soon made clear that he doubts Moore& #39;s accusers and that he& #39;d rather have a Republican in the Senate than a Democrat. The president is still incredibly popular in Alabama, so what he says about Moore and his accusers matters. Photo by Kevin Lamarque @reuters
- On Friday, President Trump went down South to urge nearby Alabama voters to send Roy Moore, a man accused of making sexual advances on teenagers, to the U.S. Senate. "We want jobs, jobs, jobs. So get out and vote for Roy Moore. Do it. Do it. Do it," Trump said. He kept his distance at first, but Trump, who is facing his own allegations of sexual misconduct and harassment from more than a dozen women, soon made clear that he doubts Moore's accusers and that he'd rather have a Republican in the Senate than a Democrat. The president is still incredibly popular in Alabama, so what he says about Moore and his accusers matters. Photo by Kevin Lamarque—@reuters

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