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- Singing “God Bless America” and the civil-rights-era anthem “We Shall Overcome,” hundreds of people marched with lit candles across the University of Virginia campus Wednesday night. It was a contrast from the white nationalist, torch-lit demonstration that occurred in #Charlottesville last Friday. The vigil came hours after state and national leaders spoke at a memorial for Heather Heyer, the 32-year-old woman who was killed when a vehicle pushed through a crowd on a Charlottesville street, injuring 19 other people. (Photo: @salwangeorges/The Washington Post)
- Singing “God Bless America” and the civil-rights-era anthem “We Shall Overcome,” hundreds of people marched with lit candles across the University of Virginia campus Wednesday night. It was a contrast from the white nationalist, torch-lit demonstration that occurred in #Charlottesville last Friday. The vigil came hours after state and national leaders spoke at a memorial for Heather Heyer, the 32-year-old woman who was killed when a vehicle pushed through a crowd on a Charlottesville street, injuring 19 other people. (Photo: @salwangeorges /The Washington Post)
- Singing “God Bless America” and the civil-rights-era anthem “We Shall Overcome,” hundreds of people marched with lit candles across the University of Virginia campus Wednesday night. It was a contrast from the white nationalist, torch-lit demonstration that occurred in #Charlottesville last Friday. The vigil came hours after state and national leaders spoke at a memorial for Heather Heyer, the 32-year-old woman who was killed when a vehicle pushed through a crowd on a Charlottesville street, injuring 19 other people. (Photo: @salwangeorges/The Washington Post)
- It had been a month since Latee Smith’s 15th birthday and a week since a bullet blew a hole through his right hip, tearing into muscle and bone and leaving him bleeding on a sidewalk. He was terrified he was about to become another dead teenager on another Chicago street corner. In his hospital bed, Latee could think of little else other than “revenge, revenge, revenge.” Still, he hoped for more — to go to college and maybe become an engineer. And revenge might not keep him safe in a city where he would still have to navigate the threat of constant and often random shootings, of rival gang members, and of pressure from friends. “I’m lucky I got shot,” Smith said. “The bullet made me more mature. Smarter.” (Photo: @cariotir / The Washington Post)
- It had been a month since Latee Smith’s 15th birthday and a week since a bullet blew a hole through his right hip, tearing into muscle and bone and leaving him bleeding on a sidewalk. He was terrified he was about to become another dead teenager on another Chicago street corner. In his hospital bed, Latee could think of little else other than “revenge, revenge, revenge.” Still, he hoped for more — to go to college and maybe become an engineer. And revenge might not keep him safe in a city where he would still have to navigate the threat of constant and often random shootings, of rival gang members, and of pressure from friends. “I’m lucky I got shot,” Smith said. “The bullet made me more mature. Smarter.” (Photo: @cariotir / The Washington Post)
- It had been a month since Latee Smith’s 15th birthday and a week since a bullet blew a hole through his right hip, tearing into muscle and bone and leaving him bleeding on a sidewalk. He was terrified he was about to become another dead teenager on another Chicago street corner. In his hospital bed, Latee could think of little else other than “revenge, revenge, revenge.” Still, he hoped for more — to go to college and maybe become an engineer. And revenge might not keep him safe in a city where he would still have to navigate the threat of constant and often random shootings, of rival gang members, and of pressure from friends. “I’m lucky I got shot,” Smith said. “The bullet made me more mature. Smarter.” (Photo: @cariotir / The Washington Post)
- Until one early Saturday morning last July, a statue of a Confederate solider stood prominently in the middle of Demopolis, Ala. After an on-duty officer who fell asleep at the wheel crashed into the monument erected in 1910 during a wave of post-Reconstruction Confederate memorialization, the town of 7,020 — 50 percent black, 47 percent white — faced a dilemma: one faction saw an opportunity to tell a new story about Demopolis, and another wanted to dig in to defend an older version. As cities around the country wrestled with whether to take down their Confederate monuments, Demopolis had to decide whether to put its soldier back up. @montywashpost wrote this town’s story in July for @washingtonpostmag. Visit the link in our profile to read more. (Photo: @jaheezus/ The Washington Post)
- Until one early Saturday morning last July, a statue of a Confederate solider stood prominently in the middle of Demopolis, Ala. After an on-duty officer who fell asleep at the wheel crashed into the monument erected in 1910 during a wave of post-Reconstruction Confederate memorialization, the town of 7,020 — 50 percent black, 47 percent white — faced a dilemma: one faction saw an opportunity to tell a new story about Demopolis, and another wanted to dig in to defend an older version. As cities around the country wrestled with whether to take down their Confederate monuments, Demopolis had to decide whether to put its soldier back up. @montywashpost wrote this town’s story in July for @washingtonpostmag. Visit the link in our profile to read more. (Photo: @jaheezus / The Washington Post)
- Until one early Saturday morning last July, a statue of a Confederate solider stood prominently in the middle of Demopolis, Ala. After an on-duty officer who fell asleep at the wheel crashed into the monument erected in 1910 during a wave of post-Reconstruction Confederate memorialization, the town of 7,020 — 50 percent black, 47 percent white — faced a dilemma: one faction saw an opportunity to tell a new story about Demopolis, and another wanted to dig in to defend an older version. As cities around the country wrestled with whether to take down their Confederate monuments, Demopolis had to decide whether to put its soldier back up. @montywashpost wrote this town’s story in July for @washingtonpostmag. Visit the link in our profile to read more. (Photo: @jaheezus/ The Washington Post)
- As the afternoon heat retreats across the West Bank and Gaza, you can hear something curious above your head if you listen closely. Up on the roofs of a Shuafat refugee camp in East Jerusalem, Palestinian pigeon fanciers are making sounds – individual, unique whistles and snaps – to urge birds to fly further and higher, or to come home. Breeding, showing, trading, selling, flying and racing pigeons is an old pastime in the Middle East, pursued by both Jews and Arabs, like Yazen Al-Qum who exercises pigeons from the rooftop of his family home. To him, training pigeons is a much better activity for the Palestinian youth instead of throwing rocks and acting out. (Photo: Linda Davidson/ The Washington Post)
- As the afternoon heat retreats across the West Bank and Gaza, you can hear something curious above your head if you listen closely. Up on the roofs of a Shuafat refugee camp in East Jerusalem, Palestinian pigeon fanciers are making sounds – individual, unique whistles and snaps – to urge birds to fly further and higher, or to come home. Breeding, showing, trading, selling, flying and racing pigeons is an old pastime in the Middle East, pursued by both Jews and Arabs, like Yazen Al-Qum who exercises pigeons from the rooftop of his family home. To him, training pigeons is a much better activity for the Palestinian youth instead of throwing rocks and acting out. (Photo: Linda Davidson/ The Washington Post)
- As the afternoon heat retreats across the West Bank and Gaza, you can hear something curious above your head if you listen closely. Up on the roofs of a Shuafat refugee camp in East Jerusalem, Palestinian pigeon fanciers are making sounds – individual, unique whistles and snaps – to urge birds to fly further and higher, or to come home. Breeding, showing, trading, selling, flying and racing pigeons is an old pastime in the Middle East, pursued by both Jews and Arabs, like Yazen Al-Qum who exercises pigeons from the rooftop of his family home. To him, training pigeons is a much better activity for the Palestinian youth instead of throwing rocks and acting out. (Photo: Linda Davidson/ The Washington Post)
- Aboard the CCGS Amundsen, a ship so famous in Canada that it is pictured on the $50 bill, are coast guard sailors and scientists working with ArcticNet. They are researching how the waters of the Arctic are changing because of climate change and increased vessel traffic. It’s a mission that often involves large and expensive equipment and looking for clues from thousands of years ago when the environment was covered with a sheet of ice. At any moment, the ship can be diverted from scientific pursuits to search and rescue or to help out a vessel in need. Post journalists @byaliceli and @moonecc are also on the ship. Follow them as they travel aboard a 6,000-ton icebreaker through the Northwest Passage. (Photo: Alice Li/ The Washington Post)
- Aboard the CCGS Amundsen, a ship so famous in Canada that it is pictured on the $50 bill, are coast guard sailors and scientists working with ArcticNet. They are researching how the waters of the Arctic are changing because of climate change and increased vessel traffic. It’s a mission that often involves large and expensive equipment and looking for clues from thousands of years ago when the environment was covered with a sheet of ice. At any moment, the ship can be diverted from scientific pursuits to search and rescue or to help out a vessel in need. Post journalists @byaliceli and @moonecc are also on the ship. Follow them as they travel aboard a 6,000-ton icebreaker through the Northwest Passage. (Photo: Alice Li/ The Washington Post)
- Aboard the CCGS Amundsen, a ship so famous in Canada that it is pictured on the $50 bill, are coast guard sailors and scientists working with ArcticNet. They are researching how the waters of the Arctic are changing because of climate change and increased vessel traffic. It’s a mission that often involves large and expensive equipment and looking for clues from thousands of years ago when the environment was covered with a sheet of ice. At any moment, the ship can be diverted from scientific pursuits to search and rescue or to help out a vessel in need. Post journalists @byaliceli and @moonecc are also on the ship. Follow them as they travel aboard a 6,000-ton icebreaker through the Northwest Passage. (Photo: Alice Li/ The Washington Post)
- This week's foreign correspondent spotlight takes us to the northern Indian state of Haryana. That's where our India bureau chief @anniegowen met a new friend: Meku. There has been an uproar recently in India over violent "cow protection" squads who patrol highways looking for cow smugglers, as slaughtering cows or consuming beef is illegal in much of the country. "Indians revere cows," Gowen says. "but it was unusual to see one kept as essentially a house pet." Here, Meku took a small break from her mid-day meal to say hi.
- This week& #39;s foreign correspondent spotlight takes us to the northern Indian state of Haryana. That& #39;s where our India bureau chief @anniegowen met a new friend: Meku. There has been an uproar recently in India over violent "cow protection" squads who patrol highways looking for cow smugglers, as slaughtering cows or consuming beef is illegal in much of the country. "Indians revere cows," Gowen says. "but it was unusual to see one kept as essentially a house pet." Here, Meku took a small break from her mid-day meal to say hi.
- This week's foreign correspondent spotlight takes us to the northern Indian state of Haryana. That's where our India bureau chief @anniegowen met a new friend: Meku. There has been an uproar recently in India over violent "cow protection" squads who patrol highways looking for cow smugglers, as slaughtering cows or consuming beef is illegal in much of the country. "Indians revere cows," Gowen says. "but it was unusual to see one kept as essentially a house pet." Here, Meku took a small break from her mid-day meal to say hi.
- Bitseat Getaneh, a 16-year-old from Ethiopia, had just lay down in her new host's apartment after an exhausting flight to America. She brought $6,000 for tuition to study at a Christian school in Oklahoma, with hopes of one day becoming a neurosurgeon. Three hours later, she heard a thunderous boom and ran down smoke-filled stairs to safety. More than 100 residents, many working-class immigrants from Central America and Africa, also escaped, but her hosts, who were friends of her family, weren't so fortunate. The experience scarred her and she still gets frightened by everyday sounds, like the pop of a soda can opening. Yet the fire also led to possibilities she couldn’t have imagined — enrolling in a top-flight high school and positioning herself for a college scholarship. (Photo: @callakessler/ The Washington Post)
- Bitseat Getaneh, a 16-year-old from Ethiopia, had just lay down in her new host& #39;s apartment after an exhausting flight to America. She brought $6,000 for tuition to study at a Christian school in Oklahoma, with hopes of one day becoming a neurosurgeon. Three hours later, she heard a thunderous boom and ran down smoke-filled stairs to safety. More than 100 residents, many working-class immigrants from Central America and Africa, also escaped, but her hosts, who were friends of her family, weren& #39;t so fortunate. The experience scarred her and she still gets frightened by everyday sounds, like the pop of a soda can opening. Yet the fire also led to possibilities she couldn’t have imagined — enrolling in a top-flight high school and positioning herself for a college scholarship. (Photo: @callakessler / The Washington Post)
- Bitseat Getaneh, a 16-year-old from Ethiopia, had just lay down in her new host's apartment after an exhausting flight to America. She brought $6,000 for tuition to study at a Christian school in Oklahoma, with hopes of one day becoming a neurosurgeon. Three hours later, she heard a thunderous boom and ran down smoke-filled stairs to safety. More than 100 residents, many working-class immigrants from Central America and Africa, also escaped, but her hosts, who were friends of her family, weren't so fortunate. The experience scarred her and she still gets frightened by everyday sounds, like the pop of a soda can opening. Yet the fire also led to possibilities she couldn’t have imagined — enrolling in a top-flight high school and positioning herself for a college scholarship. (Photo: @callakessler/ The Washington Post)
- Orlando Gore has spent four years driving a nightly loop from downtown Washington to local homeless shelters. He’s one of a dozen outreach workers employed by the United Planning Organization, a community action agency that brings programs to the District’s low-income residents and a one-man generator of small acts of kindness. “I went through a little hardship,” Gore said, adding that reaching out to his passengers is “my way of giving back. I understand where a lot of people are coming from when they’re in this position.” (Photo: Ricky Carioti/ The Washington Post)
- Orlando Gore has spent four years driving a nightly loop from downtown Washington to local homeless shelters. He’s one of a dozen outreach workers employed by the United Planning Organization, a community action agency that brings programs to the District’s low-income residents and a one-man generator of small acts of kindness. “I went through a little hardship,” Gore said, adding that reaching out to his passengers is “my way of giving back. I understand where a lot of people are coming from when they’re in this position.” (Photo: Ricky Carioti/ The Washington Post)
- Orlando Gore has spent four years driving a nightly loop from downtown Washington to local homeless shelters. He’s one of a dozen outreach workers employed by the United Planning Organization, a community action agency that brings programs to the District’s low-income residents and a one-man generator of small acts of kindness. “I went through a little hardship,” Gore said, adding that reaching out to his passengers is “my way of giving back. I understand where a lot of people are coming from when they’re in this position.” (Photo: Ricky Carioti/ The Washington Post)
- On Stacy Nelson’s first day of class at @georgemasonu , her teacher gave a seemingly impossible assignment: write a letter to a former neo-Nazi who had firebombed a synagogue. “Dear Mr. Gillespie,” her letter began. For Nelson, whose grandparents were attacked by the Ku Klux Klan, the task was particularly personal and painful. It took her two days to finish his letter when Sean Gillespie responded. He said he was pushing himself to change his views and began reading books by black authors. “It’s weird to find yourself identifying with someone who once had so much hostility toward people who look like you,” Nelson said. (Photo: @salwangeorges/ The Washington Post)
- On Stacy Nelson’s first day of class at @georgemasonu , her teacher gave a seemingly impossible assignment: write a letter to a former neo-Nazi who had firebombed a synagogue. “Dear Mr. Gillespie,” her letter began. For Nelson, whose grandparents were attacked by the Ku Klux Klan, the task was particularly personal and painful. It took her two days to finish his letter when Sean Gillespie responded. He said he was pushing himself to change his views and began reading books by black authors. “It’s weird to find yourself identifying with someone who once had so much hostility toward people who look like you,” Nelson said. (Photo: @salwangeorges / The Washington Post)
- On Stacy Nelson’s first day of class at @georgemasonu , her teacher gave a seemingly impossible assignment: write a letter to a former neo-Nazi who had firebombed a synagogue. “Dear Mr. Gillespie,” her letter began. For Nelson, whose grandparents were attacked by the Ku Klux Klan, the task was particularly personal and painful. It took her two days to finish his letter when Sean Gillespie responded. He said he was pushing himself to change his views and began reading books by black authors. “It’s weird to find yourself identifying with someone who once had so much hostility toward people who look like you,” Nelson said. (Photo: @salwangeorges/ The Washington Post)
- Abandoned by retailers and disappointed that President Trump hasn’t yet restored economic opportunity to small communities, the people of Palatka, Fla. are taking matters into their own hands. Some have started homegrown carwashes, and small restaurants and bars have begun selling craft beers to generate income. The alternative, they said, would be to allow their beloved home to become the next example of a dying American small town. “We have to tap into our locals, our entrepreneurial spirit and our aspirations to substitute what is happening around us,” said one Palatka resident. (Photo: @zackwittman/ For The Washington Post)
- Abandoned by retailers and disappointed that President Trump hasn’t yet restored economic opportunity to small communities, the people of Palatka, Fla. are taking matters into their own hands. Some have started homegrown carwashes, and small restaurants and bars have begun selling craft beers to generate income. The alternative, they said, would be to allow their beloved home to become the next example of a dying American small town. “We have to tap into our locals, our entrepreneurial spirit and our aspirations to substitute what is happening around us,” said one Palatka resident. (Photo: @zackwittman / For The Washington Post)
- Abandoned by retailers and disappointed that President Trump hasn’t yet restored economic opportunity to small communities, the people of Palatka, Fla. are taking matters into their own hands. Some have started homegrown carwashes, and small restaurants and bars have begun selling craft beers to generate income. The alternative, they said, would be to allow their beloved home to become the next example of a dying American small town. “We have to tap into our locals, our entrepreneurial spirit and our aspirations to substitute what is happening around us,” said one Palatka resident. (Photo: @zackwittman/ For The Washington Post)
- The Andes mountain range runs through Peru along the western edge of South America. There, we see the direct effects the country is facing due to climate change. Peru is home to 70 percent of the world's "tropical glaciers" — small, high-altitude ice caps found at the earth’s middle latitudes. Millions of people depend on glacier runoff for water, food and hydroelectricity. Some of Peru’s glaciers have lost more than 90 percent of their mass. Their rapid melting has made it a laboratory for human adaption. So far, it's not going very well. (Photo: @jabinbotsford/ The Washington Post)
- The Andes mountain range runs through Peru along the western edge of South America. There, we see the direct effects the country is facing due to climate change. Peru is home to 70 percent of the world& #39;s "tropical glaciers" — small, high-altitude ice caps found at the earth’s middle latitudes. Millions of people depend on glacier runoff for water, food and hydroelectricity. Some of Peru’s glaciers have lost more than 90 percent of their mass. Their rapid melting has made it a laboratory for human adaption. So far, it& #39;s not going very well. (Photo: @jabinbotsford / The Washington Post)
- The Andes mountain range runs through Peru along the western edge of South America. There, we see the direct effects the country is facing due to climate change. Peru is home to 70 percent of the world's "tropical glaciers" — small, high-altitude ice caps found at the earth’s middle latitudes. Millions of people depend on glacier runoff for water, food and hydroelectricity. Some of Peru’s glaciers have lost more than 90 percent of their mass. Their rapid melting has made it a laboratory for human adaption. So far, it's not going very well. (Photo: @jabinbotsford/ The Washington Post)
- After years of performing tasks no one else wants to do — cleaning nasty messes and taking out trash — the unsung heroes of the kitchen might be finally getting their due. Chefs and owners at world-renowned restaurants are beginning to recognize and promote dishwashers in salary and status. Our food critic, @tomsietsema, worked a shift to understand why top chefs are starting to pay more attention to dishwashers. Visit the link in our profile to read more about his experience. (Photos: @melinamara/ The Washington Post)
- After years of performing tasks no one else wants to do — cleaning nasty messes and taking out trash — the unsung heroes of the kitchen might be finally getting their due. Chefs and owners at world-renowned restaurants are beginning to recognize and promote dishwashers in salary and status. Our food critic, @tomsietsema , worked a shift to understand why top chefs are starting to pay more attention to dishwashers. Visit the link in our profile to read more about his experience. (Photos: @melinamara / The Washington Post)
- After years of performing tasks no one else wants to do — cleaning nasty messes and taking out trash — the unsung heroes of the kitchen might be finally getting their due. Chefs and owners at world-renowned restaurants are beginning to recognize and promote dishwashers in salary and status. Our food critic, @tomsietsema, worked a shift to understand why top chefs are starting to pay more attention to dishwashers. Visit the link in our profile to read more about his experience. (Photos: @melinamara/ The Washington Post)
- Paloma Benach and Brittany Apgar, who are 13-year-old teammates on D.C. Force, won a national baseball tournament last week. Baseball, not softball. There are more than 100,000 girls playing youth baseball, but only about 1,000 play it in high school. “We have this cultural myth that baseball is for boys and softball is for girls,” said Justine Siegal, who became the first woman ever to throw at hitting practice for an @MLB team. And #softball and #baseball are not equivalent sports, as a flurry of recent Title IX lawsuits have recently argued. Only after the guys leave – as they were forced to in World War II, spawning the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League – do women get a real shot. (Photo: Theron Camp)
- Paloma Benach and Brittany Apgar, who are 13-year-old teammates on D.C. Force, won a national baseball tournament last week. Baseball, not softball. There are more than 100,000 girls playing youth baseball, but only about 1,000 play it in high school. “We have this cultural myth that baseball is for boys and softball is for girls,” said Justine Siegal, who became the first woman ever to throw at hitting practice for an @MLB team. And #softball and #baseball are not equivalent sports, as a flurry of recent Title IX lawsuits have recently argued. Only after the guys leave – as they were forced to in World War II, spawning the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League – do women get a real shot. (Photo: Theron Camp)
- Paloma Benach and Brittany Apgar, who are 13-year-old teammates on D.C. Force, won a national baseball tournament last week. Baseball, not softball. There are more than 100,000 girls playing youth baseball, but only about 1,000 play it in high school. “We have this cultural myth that baseball is for boys and softball is for girls,” said Justine Siegal, who became the first woman ever to throw at hitting practice for an @MLB team. And #softball and #baseball are not equivalent sports, as a flurry of recent Title IX lawsuits have recently argued. Only after the guys leave – as they were forced to in World War II, spawning the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League – do women get a real shot. (Photo: Theron Camp)
- They call themselves a wasted generation. Ten years after Hamas, an Islamist militant movement, seized control of Gaza, the economy in the seaside strip of 2 million has been strangled by incompetence, war and blockade. Seven in 10 people rely on humanitarian aid. Young people say they are bored out of their minds. In interviews with the @washingtonpost, Gaza’s young people said they would rather fight for a job in Tel Aviv than fight Israelis. “We are the generation that waits,” said a 24-year-old Gaza resident. (Photo: @wissamgaza/ For The Washington Post)
- They call themselves a wasted generation. Ten years after Hamas, an Islamist militant movement, seized control of Gaza, the economy in the seaside strip of 2 million has been strangled by incompetence, war and blockade. Seven in 10 people rely on humanitarian aid. Young people say they are bored out of their minds. In interviews with the @washingtonpost , Gaza’s young people said they would rather fight for a job in Tel Aviv than fight Israelis. “We are the generation that waits,” said a 24-year-old Gaza resident. (Photo: @wissamgaza / For The Washington Post)
- They call themselves a wasted generation. Ten years after Hamas, an Islamist militant movement, seized control of Gaza, the economy in the seaside strip of 2 million has been strangled by incompetence, war and blockade. Seven in 10 people rely on humanitarian aid. Young people say they are bored out of their minds. In interviews with the @washingtonpost, Gaza’s young people said they would rather fight for a job in Tel Aviv than fight Israelis. “We are the generation that waits,” said a 24-year-old Gaza resident. (Photo: @wissamgaza/ For The Washington Post)
- In the tiny town of Carbondale, Colorado, which is tucked beneath the soaring mountains just north of Aspen, summer is considered “#CowboyChristmas.” Between mid-June through August, the landscape is dotted with homegrown #rodeos that have cowboys and crowds wandering from one small town to another. At the Carbondale Wild West Rodeo, a weekly event in its 44th year, people dress in large, white #cowboy hats, blue jeans and boots. However, these are not like the rodeos you watch on television; these are family affairs that provide a stage for the spirit and attitude that define the Rockies. (Photo: @mattmcclainphoto/ The Washington Post)
- In the tiny town of Carbondale, Colorado, which is tucked beneath the soaring mountains just north of Aspen, summer is considered #CowboyChristmas .” Between mid-June through August, the landscape is dotted with homegrown #rodeos that have cowboys and crowds wandering from one small town to another. At the Carbondale Wild West Rodeo, a weekly event in its 44th year, people dress in large, white #cowboy hats, blue jeans and boots. However, these are not like the rodeos you watch on television; these are family affairs that provide a stage for the spirit and attitude that define the Rockies. (Photo: @mattmcclainphoto / The Washington Post)
- In the tiny town of Carbondale, Colorado, which is tucked beneath the soaring mountains just north of Aspen, summer is considered “#CowboyChristmas.” Between mid-June through August, the landscape is dotted with homegrown #rodeos that have cowboys and crowds wandering from one small town to another. At the Carbondale Wild West Rodeo, a weekly event in its 44th year, people dress in large, white #cowboy hats, blue jeans and boots. However, these are not like the rodeos you watch on television; these are family affairs that provide a stage for the spirit and attitude that define the Rockies. (Photo: @mattmcclainphoto/ The Washington Post)

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