Photos and video with hashtag #preservemd

#preservemd

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- The George Peabody Library, or the "Cathedral of Books," is worth sharing in this takeover simply for its historical and architectural merits. There are five floors holding hundreds of thousands of books, including a very meta World Guide to Libraries spotted on one of the shelves. The library was established in 1866 though the world-renowned interior was not completed for another decade. If you plan to visit, and you should, the library's hours are limited, opening only Tuesday through Saturday at 10:00 a.m. and closing earlier and earlier in the afternoon as the week progresses. The library sits just southeast of the Washington Monument, on the edge of Mount Vernon Place which is lush urban park stretching north, east, south, and west of the monument. The trip is worth it not only to see the inside of the library, but the surrounding neighborhood, Mount Vernon-Belvedere, which is a historic and cultural district that offers up lots of architectural sightseeing. The neighborhood is unsurprisingly home to the local AIA chapter and Engineer's Club. The library sits just southeast of the Washington Monument, on the edge of Mount Vernon Place which is lush urban park stretching north, east, south, and west of the monument. #wayfindingguidebmore Photo by: @radadajade
- The George Peabody Library, or the "Cathedral of Books," is worth sharing in this takeover simply for its historical and architectural merits. There are five floors holding hundreds of thousands of books, including a very meta World Guide to Libraries spotted on one of the shelves. The library was established in 1866 though the world-renowned interior was not completed for another decade. If you plan to visit, and you should, the library& #39;s hours are limited, opening only Tuesday through Saturday at 10:00 a.m. and closing earlier and earlier in the afternoon as the week progresses. The library sits just southeast of the Washington Monument, on the edge of Mount Vernon Place which is lush urban park stretching north, east, south, and west of the monument. The trip is worth it not only to see the inside of the library, but the surrounding neighborhood, Mount Vernon-Belvedere, which is a historic and cultural district that offers up lots of architectural sightseeing. The neighborhood is unsurprisingly home to the local AIA chapter and Engineer& #39;s Club. The library sits just southeast of the Washington Monument, on the edge of Mount Vernon Place which is lush urban park stretching north, east, south, and west of the monument. #wayfindingguidebmore Photo by: @radadajade
- The George Peabody Library, or the "Cathedral of Books," is worth sharing in this takeover simply for its historical and architectural merits. There are five floors holding hundreds of thousands of books, including a very meta World Guide to Libraries spotted on one of the shelves. The library was established in 1866 though the world-renowned interior was not completed for another decade. If you plan to visit, and you should, the library's hours are limited, opening only Tuesday through Saturday at 10:00 a.m. and closing earlier and earlier in the afternoon as the week progresses. The library sits just southeast of the Washington Monument, on the edge of Mount Vernon Place which is lush urban park stretching north, east, south, and west of the monument. The trip is worth it not only to see the inside of the library, but the surrounding neighborhood, Mount Vernon-Belvedere, which is a historic and cultural district that offers up lots of architectural sightseeing. The neighborhood is unsurprisingly home to the local AIA chapter and Engineer's Club. The library sits just southeast of the Washington Monument, on the edge of Mount Vernon Place which is lush urban park stretching north, east, south, and west of the monument. #wayfindingguidebmore Photo by: @radadajade
- Welcome to day two of @radadajade Instagram takeover! Howard Street was once one of Baltimore's strongest retail corridors. The demise of its former glory has been blamed on many historical changes to the city and the street itself, but most often the construction of the light rail is blamed. Howard Street stretches over two miles all the way from Johns Hopkins University down to the ballpark at Camden Yards, where its northern and southern most blocks are still relatively productive. The blocks shared with light rail between North Avenue and Baltimore Street are, however, largely vacant. Buzz of development along Howard Street grows with events held at the former Hutzler's department store, vision plans promoted by the Bromo Arts and Entertainment District, and a developer's plans for apartments in the 400 block. The many visions vary in scale, preservation of existing structures, and intention for its proposed uses. The current widespread vacancy along Howard Street has left a public canvas for street art and murals, some of which have already been demolished to raise new buildings. The art district plan helps to maintain public art as part of Howard Street's future while making it a more inviting area. Renderings within the plan show grassy light rail right of way and a complete overhaul of the streets into a pedestrian-only corridor. Car free streets have created successful retail corridors in other cities, but can it work for Baltimore? #wayfindingguidebmore Photo by: @radadajade
- Welcome to day two of @radadajade Instagram takeover! Howard Street was once one of Baltimore& #39;s strongest retail corridors. The demise of its former glory has been blamed on many historical changes to the city and the street itself, but most often the construction of the light rail is blamed. Howard Street stretches over two miles all the way from Johns Hopkins University down to the ballpark at Camden Yards, where its northern and southern most blocks are still relatively productive. The blocks shared with light rail between North Avenue and Baltimore Street are, however, largely vacant. Buzz of development along Howard Street grows with events held at the former Hutzler& #39;s department store, vision plans promoted by the Bromo Arts and Entertainment District, and a developer& #39;s plans for apartments in the 400 block. The many visions vary in scale, preservation of existing structures, and intention for its proposed uses. The current widespread vacancy along Howard Street has left a public canvas for street art and murals, some of which have already been demolished to raise new buildings. The art district plan helps to maintain public art as part of Howard Street& #39;s future while making it a more inviting area. Renderings within the plan show grassy light rail right of way and a complete overhaul of the streets into a pedestrian-only corridor. Car free streets have created successful retail corridors in other cities, but can it work for Baltimore? #wayfindingguidebmore Photo by: @radadajade
- Welcome to day two of @radadajade Instagram takeover! Howard Street was once one of Baltimore's strongest retail corridors. The demise of its former glory has been blamed on many historical changes to the city and the street itself, but most often the construction of the light rail is blamed. Howard Street stretches over two miles all the way from Johns Hopkins University down to the ballpark at Camden Yards, where its northern and southern most blocks are still relatively productive. The blocks shared with light rail between North Avenue and Baltimore Street are, however, largely vacant. Buzz of development along Howard Street grows with events held at the former Hutzler's department store, vision plans promoted by the Bromo Arts and Entertainment District, and a developer's plans for apartments in the 400 block. The many visions vary in scale, preservation of existing structures, and intention for its proposed uses. The current widespread vacancy along Howard Street has left a public canvas for street art and murals, some of which have already been demolished to raise new buildings. The art district plan helps to maintain public art as part of Howard Street's future while making it a more inviting area. Renderings within the plan show grassy light rail right of way and a complete overhaul of the streets into a pedestrian-only corridor. Car free streets have created successful retail corridors in other cities, but can it work for Baltimore? #wayfindingguidebmore Photo by: @radadajade
- Brown's Arcade is named after former Maryland Governor Frank Brown and was designed by Architect Henry Brauns in the early 1900s. I first noticed the entrance while passing by on a bus ride up Charles Street where the entrance is relatively hidden and unassuming. Entering from Charles Street and walking through the corridor leads to an open courtyard currently occupied by table tennis, an amenity for the patrons of Mc O'Shea's bar, and small brick steps that create the feeling of hanging out on a neighbor's stoop. It is an incredibly unique place in Baltimore, both due to its architectural elements and brilliantly simple reuse of former row houses into retail and office space. While adjacent to one of the city's busiest streets, you can quickly step into Brown's Arcade and feel some relief away from downtown traffic and noise. Brown's Arcade is one rare and lasting example of seemingly fleeting moments in Baltimore's history where places designed for people seemed to be at the forefront of design instead of as an afterthought to the design of roads and parking garages. #wayfindingguidebmore Photo by: @radadajade
- Brown& #39;s Arcade is named after former Maryland Governor Frank Brown and was designed by Architect Henry Brauns in the early 1900s. I first noticed the entrance while passing by on a bus ride up Charles Street where the entrance is relatively hidden and unassuming. Entering from Charles Street and walking through the corridor leads to an open courtyard currently occupied by table tennis, an amenity for the patrons of Mc O& #39;Shea & #39;s bar, and small brick steps that create the feeling of hanging out on a neighbor& #39;s stoop. It is an incredibly unique place in Baltimore, both due to its architectural elements and brilliantly simple reuse of former row houses into retail and office space. While adjacent to one of the city& #39;s busiest streets, you can quickly step into Brown& #39;s Arcade and feel some relief away from downtown traffic and noise. Brown& #39;s Arcade is one rare and lasting example of seemingly fleeting moments in Baltimore& #39;s history where places designed for people seemed to be at the forefront of design instead of as an afterthought to the design of roads and parking garages. #wayfindingguidebmore Photo by: @radadajade
- Brown's Arcade is named after former Maryland Governor Frank Brown and was designed by Architect Henry Brauns in the early 1900s. I first noticed the entrance while passing by on a bus ride up Charles Street where the entrance is relatively hidden and unassuming. Entering from Charles Street and walking through the corridor leads to an open courtyard currently occupied by table tennis, an amenity for the patrons of Mc O'Shea's bar, and small brick steps that create the feeling of hanging out on a neighbor's stoop. It is an incredibly unique place in Baltimore, both due to its architectural elements and brilliantly simple reuse of former row houses into retail and office space. While adjacent to one of the city's busiest streets, you can quickly step into Brown's Arcade and feel some relief away from downtown traffic and noise. Brown's Arcade is one rare and lasting example of seemingly fleeting moments in Baltimore's history where places designed for people seemed to be at the forefront of design instead of as an afterthought to the design of roads and parking garages. #wayfindingguidebmore Photo by: @radadajade

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