Photos and video with hashtag #magnolialeaf

#magnolialeaf

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- Last winter @jessyscarpone connected me with @magnoliaheather because she thought that Heather Riniker's embroidered magnolia leaves might make for an interesting article. 🌿Because I am very excitable, I lost mind when when I saw her work because, categorically, I had never seen anything like this. ✨🌸There are a number of young artists on the internet who are ushering in a new wave of "craft" by making cool, approachable artwork out of sustainable materials, like what Heather does with dried Magnolia leaves. (I hate the word "craft" because it sounds tacky, so I had to put it in scare quotes.) "In my senior portfolio class at Savannah College of Art and Design, our professor had us do an exercise [wherein] we chose different categories of words out of envelopes,” she recalls. “I think I came up with ’embroidery,’ ‘paper,’ ‘nature,’… I don’t remember all the words, but I had a needle and thread with me in class, so I just started embroidering on paper, and whatever I did then looked like a leaf. Suddenly I was just like, ‘Oh my gosh-- I can embroider on leaves!’” The rest, as they say, is history. Magnolia is a sturdy leaf, so unlike Maple it won't crumble in your hands, so it can stand up to even the most intricate embroidery. Riniker chooses to work with yellow leaves that have already fallen off the tree--those that are "already in the process of death," as she says, "but still have just enough moisture to further dry around the embroidery," which effectively seals in the design as the medium grows stiff. In this way, nature's compost is rendered anew; a piece of detritus once left for decay is transformed, against all odds, into a tiny work of art. 🍃🍃#30AmazingWomen
- Last winter @jessyscarpone connected me with @magnoliaheather because she thought that Heather Riniker& #39;s embroidered magnolia leaves might make for an interesting article. 🌿Because I am very excitable, I lost mind when when I saw her work because, categorically, I had never seen anything like this. ✨🌸There are a number of young artists on the internet who are ushering in a new wave of "craft" by making cool, approachable artwork out of sustainable materials, like what Heather does with dried Magnolia leaves. (I hate the word "craft" because it sounds tacky, so I had to put it in scare quotes.) "In my senior portfolio class at Savannah College of Art and Design, our professor had us do an exercise [wherein] we chose different categories of words out of envelopes,” she recalls. “I think I came up with ’embroidery,’ ‘paper,’ ‘nature,’… I don’t remember all the words, but I had a needle and thread with me in class, so I just started embroidering on paper, and whatever I did then looked like a leaf. Suddenly I was just like, ‘Oh my gosh-- I can embroider on leaves!’” The rest, as they say, is history. Magnolia is a sturdy leaf, so unlike Maple it won& #39;t crumble in your hands, so it can stand up to even the most intricate embroidery. Riniker chooses to work with yellow leaves that have already fallen off the tree--those that are "already in the process of death," as she says, "but still have just enough moisture to further dry around the embroidery," which effectively seals in the design as the medium grows stiff. In this way, nature& #39;s compost is rendered anew; a piece of detritus once left for decay is transformed, against all odds, into a tiny work of art. 🍃 #30AmazingWomen
- Last winter @jessyscarpone connected me with @magnoliaheather because she thought that Heather Riniker's embroidered magnolia leaves might make for an interesting article. 🌿Because I am very excitable, I lost mind when when I saw her work because, categorically, I had never seen anything like this. ✨🌸There are a number of young artists on the internet who are ushering in a new wave of "craft" by making cool, approachable artwork out of sustainable materials, like what Heather does with dried Magnolia leaves. (I hate the word "craft" because it sounds tacky, so I had to put it in scare quotes.) "In my senior portfolio class at Savannah College of Art and Design, our professor had us do an exercise [wherein] we chose different categories of words out of envelopes,” she recalls. “I think I came up with ’embroidery,’ ‘paper,’ ‘nature,’… I don’t remember all the words, but I had a needle and thread with me in class, so I just started embroidering on paper, and whatever I did then looked like a leaf. Suddenly I was just like, ‘Oh my gosh-- I can embroider on leaves!’” The rest, as they say, is history. Magnolia is a sturdy leaf, so unlike Maple it won't crumble in your hands, so it can stand up to even the most intricate embroidery. Riniker chooses to work with yellow leaves that have already fallen off the tree--those that are "already in the process of death," as she says, "but still have just enough moisture to further dry around the embroidery," which effectively seals in the design as the medium grows stiff. In this way, nature's compost is rendered anew; a piece of detritus once left for decay is transformed, against all odds, into a tiny work of art. 🍃🍃#30AmazingWomen

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