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- Happy Friday everyone! What's your weekend plans? We have sun for the first time in... a while ☀️ I'm hoping to finish Checkmate: This is Reckless by @kennedyfoxbooks tonight and immediately dive into the sequel. . #WaitingForStarlight Day 8: Elain & Nesta - Opposites that Love Each Other . I had a bit of trouble deciding what to pick for today's prompt. I eventually settled on Scarlett and Tella from CARAVAL by @stephanie_garber. These two sisters couldn't be more different, yet their love is strong. Kind of reminds me of my sister and myself. . Thank you to my sweet friend @_halfbl00dprincess for giving me this print for my birthday earlier this month. Isn't it beautiful? It's from @literarylifeco . -Special UK edition of Caraval was included in my January @fairyloot box ------------------------------------------------- #caraval #stephaniegarber #scarlettandtella #sisters #opposites #hodderbooks #nakedbooks #bookandflowers #bookstagram #blackbooks
- Happy Friday everyone! What& #39;s your weekend plans? We have sun for the first time in... a while ☀️ I& #39;m hoping to finish Checkmate: This is Reckless by @kennedyfoxbooks tonight and immediately dive into the sequel. . #WaitingForStarlight Day 8: Elain & Nesta - Opposites that Love Each Other . I had a bit of trouble deciding what to pick for today& #39;s prompt. I eventually settled on Scarlett and Tella from CARAVAL by @stephanie_garber. These two sisters couldn& #39;t be more different, yet their love is strong. Kind of reminds me of my sister and myself. . Thank you to my sweet friend @_halfbl00dprincess for giving me this print for my birthday earlier this month. Isn& #39;t it beautiful? It& #39;s from @literarylifeco . -Special UK edition of Caraval was included in my January @fairyloot box ------------------------------------------------- #caraval #stephaniegarber #scarlettandtella #sisters #opposites #hodderbooks #nakedbooks #bookandflowers #bookstagram #blackbooks
- Happy Friday everyone! What's your weekend plans? We have sun for the first time in... a while ☀️ I'm hoping to finish Checkmate: This is Reckless by @kennedyfoxbooks tonight and immediately dive into the sequel. . #WaitingForStarlight Day 8: Elain & Nesta - Opposites that Love Each Other . I had a bit of trouble deciding what to pick for today's prompt. I eventually settled on Scarlett and Tella from CARAVAL by @stephanie_garber. These two sisters couldn't be more different, yet their love is strong. Kind of reminds me of my sister and myself. . Thank you to my sweet friend @_halfbl00dprincess for giving me this print for my birthday earlier this month. Isn't it beautiful? It's from @literarylifeco . -Special UK edition of Caraval was included in my January @fairyloot box ------------------------------------------------- #caraval #stephaniegarber #scarlettandtella #sisters #opposites #hodderbooks #nakedbooks #bookandflowers #bookstagram #blackbooks
- book 36. "My wife at fifty-two years old seems to me just as attractive as the first day I met her. If I were to say this out loud, she would say, 'Douglas, that's just a line. No one prefers wrinkles, no one prefers greys.' To which I would reply, 'But none of this is a surprise. I've been expecting to watch you grow older ever since we met. It's the face itself that I love, not that face at twenty-eight or thirty-four or forty-three. It's that face.' " . .completed: april 21st .4/5 £2 (#britishheartfoundation ) .
- book 36. "My wife at fifty-two years old seems to me just as attractive as the first day I met her. If I were to say this out loud, she would say, & #39;Douglas , that& #39;s just a line. No one prefers wrinkles, no one prefers greys.& #39; To which I would reply, & #39;But none of this is a surprise. I& #39;ve been expecting to watch you grow older ever since we met. It& #39;s the face itself that I love, not that face at twenty-eight or thirty-four or forty-three. It& #39;s that face.& #39; " . .completed: april 21st .4/5 £2 #britishheartfoundation ) .
- book 36. "My wife at fifty-two years old seems to me just as attractive as the first day I met her. If I were to say this out loud, she would say, 'Douglas, that's just a line. No one prefers wrinkles, no one prefers greys.' To which I would reply, 'But none of this is a surprise. I've been expecting to watch you grow older ever since we met. It's the face itself that I love, not that face at twenty-eight or thirty-four or forty-three. It's that face.' " . .completed: april 21st .4/5 £2 (#britishheartfoundation ) .
- 1. 🔷 I am not a deeply religious person but as I finished the last story of Stephen King's 'Full Dark, No Stars', I realized that my thoughts had been circling back to a verse I had read as a child in Quran class: “And verily, to each of them your Lord will repay their works in full. Surely, He is All- Aware of what they do (Hud 11:111)”, which simply means: you reap what you sow. 'Full Dark, No Stars' , told from the perspective of two men and two women, has little to no supernatural elements. The monsters are all too human. Their crimes are as mundane as murder, as banal as the blood that seeps from the wounds of both victim and criminal. 🔷 In the first novella, farmer Wilfred James murders his wife Arlette after a fight for ownership over her land. Like Dolores Claiborne, James soon discovers that murder is easier said than done and even after the crime itself and the land for which he kills her, is secured, bleakly nightmarish dominoes topple one after the other, and he is left to ponder more than just the turn of events that render him a crippled librarian in a city he despises-- he is left to wonder if damnation comes on a tide of rodents bearing his dead wife like a monarch. It is a story in the tradition of Poe, dark justice meted out all around and as our narrator descends into madness, we are left to ponder on what he even gained from the act he thought would secure everything for him. 🔷
- 1. 🔷 I am not a deeply religious person but as I finished the last story of Stephen King& #39;s & #39;Full Dark, No Stars& #39; , I realized that my thoughts had been circling back to a verse I had read as a child in Quran class: “And verily, to each of them your Lord will repay their works in full. Surely, He is All- Aware of what they do (Hud 11:111)”, which simply means: you reap what you sow. & #39;Full Dark, No Stars& #39; , told from the perspective of two men and two women, has little to no supernatural elements. The monsters are all too human. Their crimes are as mundane as murder, as banal as the blood that seeps from the wounds of both victim and criminal. 🔷 In the first novella, farmer Wilfred James murders his wife Arlette after a fight for ownership over her land. Like Dolores Claiborne, James soon discovers that murder is easier said than done and even after the crime itself and the land for which he kills her, is secured, bleakly nightmarish dominoes topple one after the other, and he is left to ponder more than just the turn of events that render him a crippled librarian in a city he despises-- he is left to wonder if damnation comes on a tide of rodents bearing his dead wife like a monarch. It is a story in the tradition of Poe, dark justice meted out all around and as our narrator descends into madness, we are left to ponder on what he even gained from the act he thought would secure everything for him. 🔷
- 1. 🔷 I am not a deeply religious person but as I finished the last story of Stephen King's 'Full Dark, No Stars', I realized that my thoughts had been circling back to a verse I had read as a child in Quran class: “And verily, to each of them your Lord will repay their works in full. Surely, He is All- Aware of what they do (Hud 11:111)”, which simply means: you reap what you sow. 'Full Dark, No Stars' , told from the perspective of two men and two women, has little to no supernatural elements. The monsters are all too human. Their crimes are as mundane as murder, as banal as the blood that seeps from the wounds of both victim and criminal. 🔷 In the first novella, farmer Wilfred James murders his wife Arlette after a fight for ownership over her land. Like Dolores Claiborne, James soon discovers that murder is easier said than done and even after the crime itself and the land for which he kills her, is secured, bleakly nightmarish dominoes topple one after the other, and he is left to ponder more than just the turn of events that render him a crippled librarian in a city he despises-- he is left to wonder if damnation comes on a tide of rodents bearing his dead wife like a monarch. It is a story in the tradition of Poe, dark justice meted out all around and as our narrator descends into madness, we are left to ponder on what he even gained from the act he thought would secure everything for him. 🔷
- 2. 🔷 'Big Driver' is an immensely satisfying story for any woman because here the victim become the hunter. A suspenseful story set in present day, Tess is a sedate writer, until she is raped and left for dead by a man who somehow knew her. As she tracks down her rapist (HER rapist), she unravels a family tied together by more than just her crime-- but of the rape and murder of other women as well. It is a fast-paced thrilling story, efficient in it's neat tying up of all narrative threads. I am hard-pressed to recall which cheered me up this immensely in spite of its harrowing plot. 🔷 Fair Extension' is slightly supernatural as it's protagonist is the childishly named Mr Elvid (I mean, come on) who promises an extension to cancer-riddled Harry Streeter. This comes at a cost of course but beautifully, none of it is to be borne by Mr Streeter. But as the story progresses, we ealize that Mr Elvid had lied when he said the soul of a man was meaningless to him. In robbing Mr Streeter of his compassion and his essential good nature, Mr Elvid derives more than his fair share of the agreed upon price. It is a quintessentially King story, one that is gleeful even as it is morose. 🔷 In 'A Good Marriage', the plot seems predictable enough at first but the sudden turn of events still sets your teeth on edge. While it felt like a Thomas Harris story at some points, this is still a remarkably retrained story one that showcases best the evolution of Mr King's writing style over the years. No emotion is unwarranted, no unnecessary word are wasted on justifications. It is, simply, excellence in structured story telling.
- 2. 🔷 & #39;Big Driver& #39; is an immensely satisfying story for any woman because here the victim become the hunter. A suspenseful story set in present day, Tess is a sedate writer, until she is raped and left for dead by a man who somehow knew her. As she tracks down her rapist (HER rapist), she unravels a family tied together by more than just her crime-- but of the rape and murder of other women as well. It is a fast-paced thrilling story, efficient in it& #39;s neat tying up of all narrative threads. I am hard-pressed to recall which cheered me up this immensely in spite of its harrowing plot. 🔷 Fair Extension& #39; is slightly supernatural as it& #39;s protagonist is the childishly named Mr Elvid (I mean, come on) who promises an extension to cancer-riddled Harry Streeter. This comes at a cost of course but beautifully, none of it is to be borne by Mr Streeter. But as the story progresses, we ealize that Mr Elvid had lied when he said the soul of a man was meaningless to him. In robbing Mr Streeter of his compassion and his essential good nature, Mr Elvid derives more than his fair share of the agreed upon price. It is a quintessentially King story, one that is gleeful even as it is morose. 🔷 In & #39;A Good Marriage& #39; , the plot seems predictable enough at first but the sudden turn of events still sets your teeth on edge. While it felt like a Thomas Harris story at some points, this is still a remarkably retrained story one that showcases best the evolution of Mr King& #39;s writing style over the years. No emotion is unwarranted, no unnecessary word are wasted on justifications. It is, simply, excellence in structured story telling.
- 2. 🔷 'Big Driver' is an immensely satisfying story for any woman because here the victim become the hunter. A suspenseful story set in present day, Tess is a sedate writer, until she is raped and left for dead by a man who somehow knew her. As she tracks down her rapist (HER rapist), she unravels a family tied together by more than just her crime-- but of the rape and murder of other women as well. It is a fast-paced thrilling story, efficient in it's neat tying up of all narrative threads. I am hard-pressed to recall which cheered me up this immensely in spite of its harrowing plot. 🔷 Fair Extension' is slightly supernatural as it's protagonist is the childishly named Mr Elvid (I mean, come on) who promises an extension to cancer-riddled Harry Streeter. This comes at a cost of course but beautifully, none of it is to be borne by Mr Streeter. But as the story progresses, we ealize that Mr Elvid had lied when he said the soul of a man was meaningless to him. In robbing Mr Streeter of his compassion and his essential good nature, Mr Elvid derives more than his fair share of the agreed upon price. It is a quintessentially King story, one that is gleeful even as it is morose. 🔷 In 'A Good Marriage', the plot seems predictable enough at first but the sudden turn of events still sets your teeth on edge. While it felt like a Thomas Harris story at some points, this is still a remarkably retrained story one that showcases best the evolution of Mr King's writing style over the years. No emotion is unwarranted, no unnecessary word are wasted on justifications. It is, simply, excellence in structured story telling.
- 3. 🔷 Here, a resemblance can be drawn to Mr King's previously released 'Different Seasons'. But where 'Different Seasons' began with redemption and ended with a wintry ghost story, this collection starts in darkness and ends in an even darker abyss. If murder is a crime for which there is no redemption, is vengeance for the same an even more damnable crime? It's a murky question, as old as Cain and Abel, and one that we're no closer to answering in this science-fiction year of 2017. 🔷 Favourite lines: “Life is fair. We all get the same nine-month shake in the box, and then the dice roll. Some people get a run of sevens. Some people, unfortunately, get snake-eyes. Its just how the world is.” - Stephen King, "Full Dark, No Stars"
- 3. 🔷 Here, a resemblance can be drawn to Mr King& #39;s previously released & #39;Different Seasons& #39; . But where & #39;Different Seasons& #39; began with redemption and ended with a wintry ghost story, this collection starts in darkness and ends in an even darker abyss. If murder is a crime for which there is no redemption, is vengeance for the same an even more damnable crime? It& #39;s a murky question, as old as Cain and Abel, and one that we& #39;re no closer to answering in this science-fiction year of 2017. 🔷 Favourite lines: “Life is fair. We all get the same nine-month shake in the box, and then the dice roll. Some people get a run of sevens. Some people, unfortunately, get snake-eyes. Its just how the world is.” - Stephen King, "Full Dark, No Stars"
- 3. 🔷 Here, a resemblance can be drawn to Mr King's previously released 'Different Seasons'. But where 'Different Seasons' began with redemption and ended with a wintry ghost story, this collection starts in darkness and ends in an even darker abyss. If murder is a crime for which there is no redemption, is vengeance for the same an even more damnable crime? It's a murky question, as old as Cain and Abel, and one that we're no closer to answering in this science-fiction year of 2017. 🔷 Favourite lines: “Life is fair. We all get the same nine-month shake in the box, and then the dice roll. Some people get a run of sevens. Some people, unfortunately, get snake-eyes. Its just how the world is.” - Stephen King, "Full Dark, No Stars"

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