Photos and video with hashtag #douglascrimp

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- "It wasn’t the explicit sex that stunned him most; it was the danger — the looming threat of violence — and the depressing decrepitude of a huge expanse of space once thriving and necessary to the well-being of the city." . This week at the @villagevoice! #AlvinBaltrop’s Decay and Decadence on the Hudson Piers: Faculty Jennifer Krasinski (@prettymetals) reviews Alvin Baltrop's show “At the Hudson River Piers,” that features photographs selected by #DouglasCrimp, at @galeriebuchholz NY: http://ow.ly/FcyP30egbxh 👉🏼👉🏼👉🏼 link in bio! . We are still accepting applications for the Fall 2017 term. Generous departmental scholarships, as well as other forms of assistance, are available. To see sample programs, faculty bios, news, the online journal, recordings of our popular lecture series, and admissions procedures, go to https://artwriting.sva.edu/program . #ArtWriting #MFAArtWriting #faculty #review #JenniferKrasinski Image: Alvin Baltrop, “The Piers (man going through clothing).” Courtesy of Galerie Buchholz.
- "It wasn’t the explicit sex that stunned him most; it was the danger — the looming threat of violence — and the depressing decrepitude of a huge expanse of space once thriving and necessary to the well-being of the city." . This week at the @villagevoice ! #AlvinBaltrop ’s Decay and Decadence on the Hudson Piers: Faculty Jennifer Krasinski @prettymetals ) reviews Alvin Baltrop& #39;s show “At the Hudson River Piers,” that features photographs selected by #DouglasCrimp , at @galeriebuchholz NY: http://ow.ly/FcyP30egbxh 👉🏼👉🏼👉🏼 link in bio! . We are still accepting applications for the Fall 2017 term. Generous departmental scholarships, as well as other forms of assistance, are available. To see sample programs, faculty bios, news, the online journal, recordings of our popular lecture series, and admissions procedures, go to https://artwriting.sva.edu/program . #ArtWriting #MFAArtWriting #faculty #review #JenniferKrasinski Image: Alvin Baltrop, “The Piers (man going through clothing).” Courtesy of Galerie Buchholz.
- "It wasn’t the explicit sex that stunned him most; it was the danger — the looming threat of violence — and the depressing decrepitude of a huge expanse of space once thriving and necessary to the well-being of the city." . This week at the @villagevoice! #AlvinBaltrop’s Decay and Decadence on the Hudson Piers: Faculty Jennifer Krasinski (@prettymetals) reviews Alvin Baltrop's show “At the Hudson River Piers,” that features photographs selected by #DouglasCrimp, at @galeriebuchholz NY: http://ow.ly/FcyP30egbxh 👉🏼👉🏼👉🏼 link in bio! . We are still accepting applications for the Fall 2017 term. Generous departmental scholarships, as well as other forms of assistance, are available. To see sample programs, faculty bios, news, the online journal, recordings of our popular lecture series, and admissions procedures, go to https://artwriting.sva.edu/program . #ArtWriting #MFAArtWriting #faculty #review #JenniferKrasinski Image: Alvin Baltrop, “The Piers (man going through clothing).” Courtesy of Galerie Buchholz.
- NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: BEFORE PICTURES by Douglas Crimp (2016) Douglas Crimp is the rare art critic whose work profoundly influenced a generation of artists. He is best known for his work with the “Pictures Generation” the very name of which Crimp coined to define the work of artists like Robert Longo and Cindy Sherman who appropriated images from mass culture to carry out a subversive critique. But while his influence is widely recognized, we know little about Crimp’s own formative experiences before “Pictures.”Before Pictures tells the story of Crimp’s life as a young gay man and art critic in New York City during the late 1960s through the turbulent 1970s. Crimp participated in all of what made the city so stimulating in that vibrant decade. The details of his professional and personal life are interwoven with this the particularly rich history of New York City at that time, producing a vivid portrait of both the critic and his adopted city. The book begins with his escape from his hometown in Idaho, and we quickly find Crimp writing criticism for ArtNews while working at the Guggenheim where, as a young curatorial assistant, he was one of the few to see Daniel Buren’s Peinture-Sculpture before it was removed amid cries of institutional censorship. We also travel to the Chelsea Hotel (where Crimp helped the down-on-his-luck couturier Charles James organize his papers) through to his days as a cinephile and balletomane to the founding of the art journal October, where he remained a central figure for many years. As he was developing his reputation as a critic, he was also partaking of the New York night life, from drugs and late nights alongside the Warhol crowd at the Max’s Kansas City to discos, roller-skating, and casual sex with famous (and not-so-famous) men. As AIDS began to ravage the closely linked art and gay communities, Crimp eventually turned his attention to activism dedicated to rethinking AIDS. Part biography and part cultural history, Before Pictures is a courageous account of an exceptional period in both Crimp’s life and the life of New York City [...] Available via our website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #beforepictures #agnesmartin
- NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: BEFORE PICTURES by Douglas Crimp (2016) Douglas Crimp is the rare art critic whose work profoundly influenced a generation of artists. He is best known for his work with the “Pictures Generation” the very name of which Crimp coined to define the work of artists like Robert Longo and Cindy Sherman who appropriated images from mass culture to carry out a subversive critique. But while his influence is widely recognized, we know little about Crimp’s own formative experiences before “Pictures.”Before Pictures tells the story of Crimp’s life as a young gay man and art critic in New York City during the late 1960s through the turbulent 1970s. Crimp participated in all of what made the city so stimulating in that vibrant decade. The details of his professional and personal life are interwoven with this the particularly rich history of New York City at that time, producing a vivid portrait of both the critic and his adopted city. The book begins with his escape from his hometown in Idaho, and we quickly find Crimp writing criticism for ArtNews while working at the Guggenheim where, as a young curatorial assistant, he was one of the few to see Daniel Buren’s Peinture-Sculpture before it was removed amid cries of institutional censorship. We also travel to the Chelsea Hotel (where Crimp helped the down-on-his-luck couturier Charles James organize his papers) through to his days as a cinephile and balletomane to the founding of the art journal October, where he remained a central figure for many years. As he was developing his reputation as a critic, he was also partaking of the New York night life, from drugs and late nights alongside the Warhol crowd at the Max’s Kansas City to discos, roller-skating, and casual sex with famous (and not-so-famous) men. As AIDS began to ravage the closely linked art and gay communities, Crimp eventually turned his attention to activism dedicated to rethinking AIDS. Part biography and part cultural history, Before Pictures is a courageous account of an exceptional period in both Crimp’s life and the life of New York City [...] Available via our website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #beforepictures #agnesmartin
- NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: BEFORE PICTURES by Douglas Crimp (2016) Douglas Crimp is the rare art critic whose work profoundly influenced a generation of artists. He is best known for his work with the “Pictures Generation” the very name of which Crimp coined to define the work of artists like Robert Longo and Cindy Sherman who appropriated images from mass culture to carry out a subversive critique. But while his influence is widely recognized, we know little about Crimp’s own formative experiences before “Pictures.”Before Pictures tells the story of Crimp’s life as a young gay man and art critic in New York City during the late 1960s through the turbulent 1970s. Crimp participated in all of what made the city so stimulating in that vibrant decade. The details of his professional and personal life are interwoven with this the particularly rich history of New York City at that time, producing a vivid portrait of both the critic and his adopted city. The book begins with his escape from his hometown in Idaho, and we quickly find Crimp writing criticism for ArtNews while working at the Guggenheim where, as a young curatorial assistant, he was one of the few to see Daniel Buren’s Peinture-Sculpture before it was removed amid cries of institutional censorship. We also travel to the Chelsea Hotel (where Crimp helped the down-on-his-luck couturier Charles James organize his papers) through to his days as a cinephile and balletomane to the founding of the art journal October, where he remained a central figure for many years. As he was developing his reputation as a critic, he was also partaking of the New York night life, from drugs and late nights alongside the Warhol crowd at the Max’s Kansas City to discos, roller-skating, and casual sex with famous (and not-so-famous) men. As AIDS began to ravage the closely linked art and gay communities, Crimp eventually turned his attention to activism dedicated to rethinking AIDS. Part biography and part cultural history, Before Pictures is a courageous account of an exceptional period in both Crimp’s life and the life of New York City [...] Available via our website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #beforepictures #agnesmartin
- NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: BEFORE PICTURES by Douglas Crimp (2016) Douglas Crimp is the rare art critic whose work profoundly influenced a generation of artists. He is best known for his work with the “Pictures Generation” the very name of which Crimp coined to define the work of artists like Robert Longo and Cindy Sherman who appropriated images from mass culture to carry out a subversive critique. But while his influence is widely recognized, we know little about Crimp’s own formative experiences before “Pictures.”Before Pictures tells the story of Crimp’s life as a young gay man and art critic in New York City during the late 1960s through the turbulent 1970s. Crimp participated in all of what made the city so stimulating in that vibrant decade. The details of his professional and personal life are interwoven with this the particularly rich history of New York City at that time, producing a vivid portrait of both the critic and his adopted city. The book begins with his escape from his hometown in Idaho, and we quickly find Crimp writing criticism for ArtNews while working at the Guggenheim where, as a young curatorial assistant, he was one of the few to see Daniel Buren’s Peinture-Sculpture before it was removed amid cries of institutional censorship. We also travel to the Chelsea Hotel (where Crimp helped the down-on-his-luck couturier Charles James organize his papers) through to his days as a cinephile and balletomane to the founding of the art journal October, where he remained a central figure for many years. As he was developing his reputation as a critic, he was also partaking of the New York night life, from drugs and late nights alongside the Warhol crowd at the Max’s Kansas City to discos, roller-skating, and casual sex with famous (and not-so-famous) men. As AIDS began to ravage the closely linked art and gay communities, Crimp eventually turned his attention to activism dedicated to rethinking AIDS. Part biography and part cultural history, Before Pictures is a courageous account of an exceptional period in both Crimp’s life and the life of New York City [...] Available via our website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #beforepictures #Devine
- NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: BEFORE PICTURES by Douglas Crimp (2016) Douglas Crimp is the rare art critic whose work profoundly influenced a generation of artists. He is best known for his work with the “Pictures Generation” the very name of which Crimp coined to define the work of artists like Robert Longo and Cindy Sherman who appropriated images from mass culture to carry out a subversive critique. But while his influence is widely recognized, we know little about Crimp’s own formative experiences before “Pictures.”Before Pictures tells the story of Crimp’s life as a young gay man and art critic in New York City during the late 1960s through the turbulent 1970s. Crimp participated in all of what made the city so stimulating in that vibrant decade. The details of his professional and personal life are interwoven with this the particularly rich history of New York City at that time, producing a vivid portrait of both the critic and his adopted city. The book begins with his escape from his hometown in Idaho, and we quickly find Crimp writing criticism for ArtNews while working at the Guggenheim where, as a young curatorial assistant, he was one of the few to see Daniel Buren’s Peinture-Sculpture before it was removed amid cries of institutional censorship. We also travel to the Chelsea Hotel (where Crimp helped the down-on-his-luck couturier Charles James organize his papers) through to his days as a cinephile and balletomane to the founding of the art journal October, where he remained a central figure for many years. As he was developing his reputation as a critic, he was also partaking of the New York night life, from drugs and late nights alongside the Warhol crowd at the Max’s Kansas City to discos, roller-skating, and casual sex with famous (and not-so-famous) men. As AIDS began to ravage the closely linked art and gay communities, Crimp eventually turned his attention to activism dedicated to rethinking AIDS. Part biography and part cultural history, Before Pictures is a courageous account of an exceptional period in both Crimp’s life and the life of New York City [...] Available via our website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #beforepictures #Devine
- NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: BEFORE PICTURES by Douglas Crimp (2016) Douglas Crimp is the rare art critic whose work profoundly influenced a generation of artists. He is best known for his work with the “Pictures Generation” the very name of which Crimp coined to define the work of artists like Robert Longo and Cindy Sherman who appropriated images from mass culture to carry out a subversive critique. But while his influence is widely recognized, we know little about Crimp’s own formative experiences before “Pictures.”Before Pictures tells the story of Crimp’s life as a young gay man and art critic in New York City during the late 1960s through the turbulent 1970s. Crimp participated in all of what made the city so stimulating in that vibrant decade. The details of his professional and personal life are interwoven with this the particularly rich history of New York City at that time, producing a vivid portrait of both the critic and his adopted city. The book begins with his escape from his hometown in Idaho, and we quickly find Crimp writing criticism for ArtNews while working at the Guggenheim where, as a young curatorial assistant, he was one of the few to see Daniel Buren’s Peinture-Sculpture before it was removed amid cries of institutional censorship. We also travel to the Chelsea Hotel (where Crimp helped the down-on-his-luck couturier Charles James organize his papers) through to his days as a cinephile and balletomane to the founding of the art journal October, where he remained a central figure for many years. As he was developing his reputation as a critic, he was also partaking of the New York night life, from drugs and late nights alongside the Warhol crowd at the Max’s Kansas City to discos, roller-skating, and casual sex with famous (and not-so-famous) men. As AIDS began to ravage the closely linked art and gay communities, Crimp eventually turned his attention to activism dedicated to rethinking AIDS. Part biography and part cultural history, Before Pictures is a courageous account of an exceptional period in both Crimp’s life and the life of New York City [...] Available via our website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #beforepictures #Devine
- NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: BEFORE PICTURES by Douglas Crimp (2016) Douglas Crimp is the rare art critic whose work profoundly influenced a generation of artists. He is best known for his work with the “Pictures Generation” the very name of which Crimp coined to define the work of artists like Robert Longo and Cindy Sherman who appropriated images from mass culture to carry out a subversive critique. But while his influence is widely recognized, we know little about Crimp’s own formative experiences before “Pictures.”Before Pictures tells the story of Crimp’s life as a young gay man and art critic in New York City during the late 1960s through the turbulent 1970s. Crimp participated in all of what made the city so stimulating in that vibrant decade. The details of his professional and personal life are interwoven with this the particularly rich history of New York City at that time, producing a vivid portrait of both the critic and his adopted city. The book begins with his escape from his hometown in Idaho, and we quickly find Crimp writing criticism for ArtNews while working at the Guggenheim where, as a young curatorial assistant, he was one of the few to see Daniel Buren’s Peinture-Sculpture before it was removed amid cries of institutional censorship. We also travel to the Chelsea Hotel (where Crimp helped the down-on-his-luck couturier Charles James organize his papers) through to his days as a cinephile and balletomane to the founding of the art journal October, where he remained a central figure for many years. As he was developing his reputation as a critic, he was also partaking of the New York night life, from drugs and late nights alongside the Warhol crowd at the Max’s Kansas City to discos, roller-skating, and casual sex with famous (and not-so-famous) men. As AIDS began to ravage the closely linked art and gay communities, Crimp eventually turned his attention to activism dedicated to rethinking AIDS. Part biography and part cultural history, Before Pictures is a courageous account of an exceptional period in both Crimp’s life and the life of New York City [...] Available via our website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #beforepictures
- NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: BEFORE PICTURES by Douglas Crimp (2016) Douglas Crimp is the rare art critic whose work profoundly influenced a generation of artists. He is best known for his work with the “Pictures Generation” the very name of which Crimp coined to define the work of artists like Robert Longo and Cindy Sherman who appropriated images from mass culture to carry out a subversive critique. But while his influence is widely recognized, we know little about Crimp’s own formative experiences before “Pictures.”Before Pictures tells the story of Crimp’s life as a young gay man and art critic in New York City during the late 1960s through the turbulent 1970s. Crimp participated in all of what made the city so stimulating in that vibrant decade. The details of his professional and personal life are interwoven with this the particularly rich history of New York City at that time, producing a vivid portrait of both the critic and his adopted city. The book begins with his escape from his hometown in Idaho, and we quickly find Crimp writing criticism for ArtNews while working at the Guggenheim where, as a young curatorial assistant, he was one of the few to see Daniel Buren’s Peinture-Sculpture before it was removed amid cries of institutional censorship. We also travel to the Chelsea Hotel (where Crimp helped the down-on-his-luck couturier Charles James organize his papers) through to his days as a cinephile and balletomane to the founding of the art journal October, where he remained a central figure for many years. As he was developing his reputation as a critic, he was also partaking of the New York night life, from drugs and late nights alongside the Warhol crowd at the Max’s Kansas City to discos, roller-skating, and casual sex with famous (and not-so-famous) men. As AIDS began to ravage the closely linked art and gay communities, Crimp eventually turned his attention to activism dedicated to rethinking AIDS. Part biography and part cultural history, Before Pictures is a courageous account of an exceptional period in both Crimp’s life and the life of New York City [...] Available via our website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #beforepictures
- NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: BEFORE PICTURES by Douglas Crimp (2016) Douglas Crimp is the rare art critic whose work profoundly influenced a generation of artists. He is best known for his work with the “Pictures Generation” the very name of which Crimp coined to define the work of artists like Robert Longo and Cindy Sherman who appropriated images from mass culture to carry out a subversive critique. But while his influence is widely recognized, we know little about Crimp’s own formative experiences before “Pictures.”Before Pictures tells the story of Crimp’s life as a young gay man and art critic in New York City during the late 1960s through the turbulent 1970s. Crimp participated in all of what made the city so stimulating in that vibrant decade. The details of his professional and personal life are interwoven with this the particularly rich history of New York City at that time, producing a vivid portrait of both the critic and his adopted city. The book begins with his escape from his hometown in Idaho, and we quickly find Crimp writing criticism for ArtNews while working at the Guggenheim where, as a young curatorial assistant, he was one of the few to see Daniel Buren’s Peinture-Sculpture before it was removed amid cries of institutional censorship. We also travel to the Chelsea Hotel (where Crimp helped the down-on-his-luck couturier Charles James organize his papers) through to his days as a cinephile and balletomane to the founding of the art journal October, where he remained a central figure for many years. As he was developing his reputation as a critic, he was also partaking of the New York night life, from drugs and late nights alongside the Warhol crowd at the Max’s Kansas City to discos, roller-skating, and casual sex with famous (and not-so-famous) men. As AIDS began to ravage the closely linked art and gay communities, Crimp eventually turned his attention to activism dedicated to rethinking AIDS. Part biography and part cultural history, Before Pictures is a courageous account of an exceptional period in both Crimp’s life and the life of New York City [...] Available via our website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #beforepictures
- OPEN TODAY 12-4 PM. NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: ON THE MUSEUM’S RUINS by Douglas Crimp (Photographs By Louise Lawler) (1995) On the Museum’s Ruins presents Douglas Crimp’s criticism of contemporary art, its institutions, and its politics alongside photographic works by the artist Louise Lawler to create a collaborative project that is itself an example of postmodern practice at its most provocative. Crimp elaborates the new paradigm of postmodernism through analyses of art practices broadly conceived, not only the practices of artists—Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman, Marcel Broodthaers, Richard Serra, Sherrie Levine, and Robert Mapplethorpe—but those of critics and curators, of international exhibitions, and of new or refurbished museums such as the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart and the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. The essays: – Photographs at the End of Modernism. – On the Museum’s Ruins. – The Museum’s Old, the Library’s New Subject. – The End of Painting. – The Photographic Activity of Postmodernism. – Appropriating Appropriation. – Redefining Site Specificity. – This is Not a Museum of Art. – The Art of Exhibition. – The Postmodern Museum. About the Author Douglas Crimp is Fanny Knapp Allen Professor of Art History at the University of Rochester. He is the author of On the Museum’s Ruins and Melancholia and Moralism: Essays on AIDS and Queer Politics, both published by the MIT Press. Reviews “Literate and provocative speculations about art, photography, postmodernism, homoeroticism, Rauchenberg and Mapplethorpe, museums and libraries.” Endorsements “Crimp’s essays comprise one of the most interesting and incisive bodies of work on practices of contemporary art in relationships to art as institution.” —Andreas Huyssen, Columbia University Available today in the bookshop and via the website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #lousielawler
- OPEN TODAY 12-4 PM. NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: ON THE MUSEUM’S RUINS by Douglas Crimp (Photographs By Louise Lawler) (1995) On the Museum’s Ruins presents Douglas Crimp’s criticism of contemporary art, its institutions, and its politics alongside photographic works by the artist Louise Lawler to create a collaborative project that is itself an example of postmodern practice at its most provocative. Crimp elaborates the new paradigm of postmodernism through analyses of art practices broadly conceived, not only the practices of artists—Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman, Marcel Broodthaers, Richard Serra, Sherrie Levine, and Robert Mapplethorpe—but those of critics and curators, of international exhibitions, and of new or refurbished museums such as the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart and the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. The essays: – Photographs at the End of Modernism. – On the Museum’s Ruins. – The Museum’s Old, the Library’s New Subject. – The End of Painting. – The Photographic Activity of Postmodernism. – Appropriating Appropriation. – Redefining Site Specificity. – This is Not a Museum of Art. – The Art of Exhibition. – The Postmodern Museum. About the Author Douglas Crimp is Fanny Knapp Allen Professor of Art History at the University of Rochester. He is the author of On the Museum’s Ruins and Melancholia and Moralism: Essays on AIDS and Queer Politics, both published by the MIT Press. Reviews “Literate and provocative speculations about art, photography, postmodernism, homoeroticism, Rauchenberg and Mapplethorpe, museums and libraries.” Endorsements “Crimp’s essays comprise one of the most interesting and incisive bodies of work on practices of contemporary art in relationships to art as institution.” —Andreas Huyssen, Columbia University Available today in the bookshop and via the website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #lousielawler
- OPEN TODAY 12-4 PM. NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: ON THE MUSEUM’S RUINS by Douglas Crimp (Photographs By Louise Lawler) (1995) On the Museum’s Ruins presents Douglas Crimp’s criticism of contemporary art, its institutions, and its politics alongside photographic works by the artist Louise Lawler to create a collaborative project that is itself an example of postmodern practice at its most provocative. Crimp elaborates the new paradigm of postmodernism through analyses of art practices broadly conceived, not only the practices of artists—Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman, Marcel Broodthaers, Richard Serra, Sherrie Levine, and Robert Mapplethorpe—but those of critics and curators, of international exhibitions, and of new or refurbished museums such as the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart and the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. The essays: – Photographs at the End of Modernism. – On the Museum’s Ruins. – The Museum’s Old, the Library’s New Subject. – The End of Painting. – The Photographic Activity of Postmodernism. – Appropriating Appropriation. – Redefining Site Specificity. – This is Not a Museum of Art. – The Art of Exhibition. – The Postmodern Museum. About the Author Douglas Crimp is Fanny Knapp Allen Professor of Art History at the University of Rochester. He is the author of On the Museum’s Ruins and Melancholia and Moralism: Essays on AIDS and Queer Politics, both published by the MIT Press. Reviews “Literate and provocative speculations about art, photography, postmodernism, homoeroticism, Rauchenberg and Mapplethorpe, museums and libraries.” Endorsements “Crimp’s essays comprise one of the most interesting and incisive bodies of work on practices of contemporary art in relationships to art as institution.” —Andreas Huyssen, Columbia University Available today in the bookshop and via the website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #lousielawler
- OPEN TODAY 12-4 PM. NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: ON THE MUSEUM’S RUINS by Douglas Crimp (Photographs By Louise Lawler) (1995) On the Museum’s Ruins presents Douglas Crimp’s criticism of contemporary art, its institutions, and its politics alongside photographic works by the artist Louise Lawler to create a collaborative project that is itself an example of postmodern practice at its most provocative. Crimp elaborates the new paradigm of postmodernism through analyses of art practices broadly conceived, not only the practices of artists—Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman, Marcel Broodthaers, Richard Serra, Sherrie Levine, and Robert Mapplethorpe—but those of critics and curators, of international exhibitions, and of new or refurbished museums such as the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart and the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. The essays: – Photographs at the End of Modernism. – On the Museum’s Ruins. – The Museum’s Old, the Library’s New Subject. – The End of Painting. – The Photographic Activity of Postmodernism. – Appropriating Appropriation. – Redefining Site Specificity. – This is Not a Museum of Art. – The Art of Exhibition. – The Postmodern Museum. About the Author Douglas Crimp is Fanny Knapp Allen Professor of Art History at the University of Rochester. He is the author of On the Museum’s Ruins and Melancholia and Moralism: Essays on AIDS and Queer Politics, both published by the MIT Press. Reviews “Literate and provocative speculations about art, photography, postmodernism, homoeroticism, Rauchenberg and Mapplethorpe, museums and libraries.” Endorsements “Crimp’s essays comprise one of the most interesting and incisive bodies of work on practices of contemporary art in relationships to art as institution.” —Andreas Huyssen, Columbia University Available today in the bookshop and via the website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #lousielawler
- OPEN TODAY 12-4 PM. NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: ON THE MUSEUM’S RUINS by Douglas Crimp (Photographs By Louise Lawler) (1995) On the Museum’s Ruins presents Douglas Crimp’s criticism of contemporary art, its institutions, and its politics alongside photographic works by the artist Louise Lawler to create a collaborative project that is itself an example of postmodern practice at its most provocative. Crimp elaborates the new paradigm of postmodernism through analyses of art practices broadly conceived, not only the practices of artists—Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman, Marcel Broodthaers, Richard Serra, Sherrie Levine, and Robert Mapplethorpe—but those of critics and curators, of international exhibitions, and of new or refurbished museums such as the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart and the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. The essays: – Photographs at the End of Modernism. – On the Museum’s Ruins. – The Museum’s Old, the Library’s New Subject. – The End of Painting. – The Photographic Activity of Postmodernism. – Appropriating Appropriation. – Redefining Site Specificity. – This is Not a Museum of Art. – The Art of Exhibition. – The Postmodern Museum. About the Author Douglas Crimp is Fanny Knapp Allen Professor of Art History at the University of Rochester. He is the author of On the Museum’s Ruins and Melancholia and Moralism: Essays on AIDS and Queer Politics, both published by the MIT Press. Reviews “Literate and provocative speculations about art, photography, postmodernism, homoeroticism, Rauchenberg and Mapplethorpe, museums and libraries.” Endorsements “Crimp’s essays comprise one of the most interesting and incisive bodies of work on practices of contemporary art in relationships to art as institution.” —Andreas Huyssen, Columbia University Available today in the bookshop and via the website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #lousielawler
- OPEN TODAY 12-4 PM. NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: ON THE MUSEUM’S RUINS by Douglas Crimp (Photographs By Louise Lawler) (1995) On the Museum’s Ruins presents Douglas Crimp’s criticism of contemporary art, its institutions, and its politics alongside photographic works by the artist Louise Lawler to create a collaborative project that is itself an example of postmodern practice at its most provocative. Crimp elaborates the new paradigm of postmodernism through analyses of art practices broadly conceived, not only the practices of artists—Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman, Marcel Broodthaers, Richard Serra, Sherrie Levine, and Robert Mapplethorpe—but those of critics and curators, of international exhibitions, and of new or refurbished museums such as the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart and the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. The essays: – Photographs at the End of Modernism. – On the Museum’s Ruins. – The Museum’s Old, the Library’s New Subject. – The End of Painting. – The Photographic Activity of Postmodernism. – Appropriating Appropriation. – Redefining Site Specificity. – This is Not a Museum of Art. – The Art of Exhibition. – The Postmodern Museum. About the Author Douglas Crimp is Fanny Knapp Allen Professor of Art History at the University of Rochester. He is the author of On the Museum’s Ruins and Melancholia and Moralism: Essays on AIDS and Queer Politics, both published by the MIT Press. Reviews “Literate and provocative speculations about art, photography, postmodernism, homoeroticism, Rauchenberg and Mapplethorpe, museums and libraries.” Endorsements “Crimp’s essays comprise one of the most interesting and incisive bodies of work on practices of contemporary art in relationships to art as institution.” —Andreas Huyssen, Columbia University Available today in the bookshop and via the website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #lousielawler
- OPEN TODAY 12-4 PM. NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: ON THE MUSEUM’S RUINS by Douglas Crimp (Photographs By Louise Lawler) (1995) On the Museum’s Ruins presents Douglas Crimp’s criticism of contemporary art, its institutions, and its politics alongside photographic works by the artist Louise Lawler to create a collaborative project that is itself an example of postmodern practice at its most provocative. Crimp elaborates the new paradigm of postmodernism through analyses of art practices broadly conceived, not only the practices of artists—Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman, Marcel Broodthaers, Richard Serra, Sherrie Levine, and Robert Mapplethorpe—but those of critics and curators, of international exhibitions, and of new or refurbished museums such as the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart and the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. The essays: – Photographs at the End of Modernism. – On the Museum’s Ruins. – The Museum’s Old, the Library’s New Subject. – The End of Painting. – The Photographic Activity of Postmodernism. – Appropriating Appropriation. – Redefining Site Specificity. – This is Not a Museum of Art. – The Art of Exhibition. – The Postmodern Museum. About the Author Douglas Crimp is Fanny Knapp Allen Professor of Art History at the University of Rochester. He is the author of On the Museum’s Ruins and Melancholia and Moralism: Essays on AIDS and Queer Politics, both published by the MIT Press. Reviews “Literate and provocative speculations about art, photography, postmodernism, homoeroticism, Rauchenberg and Mapplethorpe, museums and libraries.” Endorsements “Crimp’s essays comprise one of the most interesting and incisive bodies of work on practices of contemporary art in relationships to art as institution.” —Andreas Huyssen, Columbia University Available today in the bookshop and via the website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #lousielawler
- OPEN TODAY 12-4 PM. NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: ON THE MUSEUM’S RUINS by Douglas Crimp (Photographs By Louise Lawler) (1995) On the Museum’s Ruins presents Douglas Crimp’s criticism of contemporary art, its institutions, and its politics alongside photographic works by the artist Louise Lawler to create a collaborative project that is itself an example of postmodern practice at its most provocative. Crimp elaborates the new paradigm of postmodernism through analyses of art practices broadly conceived, not only the practices of artists—Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman, Marcel Broodthaers, Richard Serra, Sherrie Levine, and Robert Mapplethorpe—but those of critics and curators, of international exhibitions, and of new or refurbished museums such as the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart and the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. The essays: – Photographs at the End of Modernism. – On the Museum’s Ruins. – The Museum’s Old, the Library’s New Subject. – The End of Painting. – The Photographic Activity of Postmodernism. – Appropriating Appropriation. – Redefining Site Specificity. – This is Not a Museum of Art. – The Art of Exhibition. – The Postmodern Museum. About the Author Douglas Crimp is Fanny Knapp Allen Professor of Art History at the University of Rochester. He is the author of On the Museum’s Ruins and Melancholia and Moralism: Essays on AIDS and Queer Politics, both published by the MIT Press. Reviews “Literate and provocative speculations about art, photography, postmodernism, homoeroticism, Rauchenberg and Mapplethorpe, museums and libraries.” Endorsements “Crimp’s essays comprise one of the most interesting and incisive bodies of work on practices of contemporary art in relationships to art as institution.” —Andreas Huyssen, Columbia University Available today in the bookshop and via the website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #lousielawler
- OPEN TODAY 12-4 PM. NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: ON THE MUSEUM’S RUINS by Douglas Crimp (Photographs By Louise Lawler) (1995) On the Museum’s Ruins presents Douglas Crimp’s criticism of contemporary art, its institutions, and its politics alongside photographic works by the artist Louise Lawler to create a collaborative project that is itself an example of postmodern practice at its most provocative. Crimp elaborates the new paradigm of postmodernism through analyses of art practices broadly conceived, not only the practices of artists—Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman, Marcel Broodthaers, Richard Serra, Sherrie Levine, and Robert Mapplethorpe—but those of critics and curators, of international exhibitions, and of new or refurbished museums such as the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart and the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. The essays: – Photographs at the End of Modernism. – On the Museum’s Ruins. – The Museum’s Old, the Library’s New Subject. – The End of Painting. – The Photographic Activity of Postmodernism. – Appropriating Appropriation. – Redefining Site Specificity. – This is Not a Museum of Art. – The Art of Exhibition. – The Postmodern Museum. About the Author Douglas Crimp is Fanny Knapp Allen Professor of Art History at the University of Rochester. He is the author of On the Museum’s Ruins and Melancholia and Moralism: Essays on AIDS and Queer Politics, both published by the MIT Press. Reviews “Literate and provocative speculations about art, photography, postmodernism, homoeroticism, Rauchenberg and Mapplethorpe, museums and libraries.” Endorsements “Crimp’s essays comprise one of the most interesting and incisive bodies of work on practices of contemporary art in relationships to art as institution.” —Andreas Huyssen, Columbia University Available today in the bookshop and via the website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #lousielawler
- On the Museum's Ruins presents Douglas Crimp's criticism of contemporary art, its institutions, and its politics alongside photographic works by the artist Louise Lawler to create a collaborative project that is itself an example of postmodern practice at its most provocative. Crimp elaborates the new paradigm of postmodernism through analyses of art practices broadly conceived, not only the practices of artists -- Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman, Marcel Broodthaers, Richard Serra, Sherrie Levine, and Robert Mapplethorpe -- but those of critics and curators, of international exhibitions, and of new or refurbished museums such as the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart and the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. The essays: - Photographs at the End of Modernism. - On the Museum's Ruins. - The Museum's Old, the Library's New Subject. - The End of Painting. - The Photographic Activity of Postmodernism. - Appropriating Appropriation. - Redefining Site Specificity. - This is Not a Museum of Art. - The Art of Exhibition. - The Postmodern Museum.
- On the Museum& #39;s Ruins presents Douglas Crimp& #39;s criticism of contemporary art, its institutions, and its politics alongside photographic works by the artist Louise Lawler to create a collaborative project that is itself an example of postmodern practice at its most provocative. Crimp elaborates the new paradigm of postmodernism through analyses of art practices broadly conceived, not only the practices of artists -- Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman, Marcel Broodthaers, Richard Serra, Sherrie Levine, and Robert Mapplethorpe -- but those of critics and curators, of international exhibitions, and of new or refurbished museums such as the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart and the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. The essays: - Photographs at the End of Modernism. - On the Museum& #39;s Ruins. - The Museum& #39;s Old, the Library& #39;s New Subject. - The End of Painting. - The Photographic Activity of Postmodernism. - Appropriating Appropriation. - Redefining Site Specificity. - This is Not a Museum of Art. - The Art of Exhibition. - The Postmodern Museum.
- On the Museum's Ruins presents Douglas Crimp's criticism of contemporary art, its institutions, and its politics alongside photographic works by the artist Louise Lawler to create a collaborative project that is itself an example of postmodern practice at its most provocative. Crimp elaborates the new paradigm of postmodernism through analyses of art practices broadly conceived, not only the practices of artists -- Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman, Marcel Broodthaers, Richard Serra, Sherrie Levine, and Robert Mapplethorpe -- but those of critics and curators, of international exhibitions, and of new or refurbished museums such as the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart and the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. The essays: - Photographs at the End of Modernism. - On the Museum's Ruins. - The Museum's Old, the Library's New Subject. - The End of Painting. - The Photographic Activity of Postmodernism. - Appropriating Appropriation. - Redefining Site Specificity. - This is Not a Museum of Art. - The Art of Exhibition. - The Postmodern Museum.
- OPEN TODAY 12-4 PM. NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: ON THE MUSEUM’S RUINS by Douglas Crimp (Photographs By Louise Lawler) (1995) On the Museum’s Ruins presents Douglas Crimp’s criticism of contemporary art, its institutions, and its politics alongside photographic works by the artist Louise Lawler to create a collaborative project that is itself an example of postmodern practice at its most provocative. Crimp elaborates the new paradigm of postmodernism through analyses of art practices broadly conceived, not only the practices of artists—Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman, Marcel Broodthaers, Richard Serra, Sherrie Levine, and Robert Mapplethorpe—but those of critics and curators, of international exhibitions, and of new or refurbished museums such as the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart and the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. The essays: – Photographs at the End of Modernism. – On the Museum’s Ruins. – The Museum’s Old, the Library’s New Subject. – The End of Painting. – The Photographic Activity of Postmodernism. – Appropriating Appropriation. – Redefining Site Specificity. – This is Not a Museum of Art. – The Art of Exhibition. – The Postmodern Museum. About the Author Douglas Crimp is Fanny Knapp Allen Professor of Art History at the University of Rochester. He is the author of On the Museum’s Ruins and Melancholia and Moralism: Essays on AIDS and Queer Politics, both published by the MIT Press. Reviews “Literate and provocative speculations about art, photography, postmodernism, homoeroticism, Rauchenberg and Mapplethorpe, museums and libraries.” Endorsements “Crimp’s essays comprise one of the most interesting and incisive bodies of work on practices of contemporary art in relationships to art as institution.” —Andreas Huyssen, Columbia University Available today in the bookshop and via the website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #lousielawler
- OPEN TODAY 12-4 PM. NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: ON THE MUSEUM’S RUINS by Douglas Crimp (Photographs By Louise Lawler) (1995) On the Museum’s Ruins presents Douglas Crimp’s criticism of contemporary art, its institutions, and its politics alongside photographic works by the artist Louise Lawler to create a collaborative project that is itself an example of postmodern practice at its most provocative. Crimp elaborates the new paradigm of postmodernism through analyses of art practices broadly conceived, not only the practices of artists—Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman, Marcel Broodthaers, Richard Serra, Sherrie Levine, and Robert Mapplethorpe—but those of critics and curators, of international exhibitions, and of new or refurbished museums such as the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart and the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. The essays: – Photographs at the End of Modernism. – On the Museum’s Ruins. – The Museum’s Old, the Library’s New Subject. – The End of Painting. – The Photographic Activity of Postmodernism. – Appropriating Appropriation. – Redefining Site Specificity. – This is Not a Museum of Art. – The Art of Exhibition. – The Postmodern Museum. About the Author Douglas Crimp is Fanny Knapp Allen Professor of Art History at the University of Rochester. He is the author of On the Museum’s Ruins and Melancholia and Moralism: Essays on AIDS and Queer Politics, both published by the MIT Press. Reviews “Literate and provocative speculations about art, photography, postmodernism, homoeroticism, Rauchenberg and Mapplethorpe, museums and libraries.” Endorsements “Crimp’s essays comprise one of the most interesting and incisive bodies of work on practices of contemporary art in relationships to art as institution.” —Andreas Huyssen, Columbia University Available today in the bookshop and via the website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #lousielawler
- OPEN TODAY 12-4 PM. NEW IN THE BOOKSHOP: ON THE MUSEUM’S RUINS by Douglas Crimp (Photographs By Louise Lawler) (1995) On the Museum’s Ruins presents Douglas Crimp’s criticism of contemporary art, its institutions, and its politics alongside photographic works by the artist Louise Lawler to create a collaborative project that is itself an example of postmodern practice at its most provocative. Crimp elaborates the new paradigm of postmodernism through analyses of art practices broadly conceived, not only the practices of artists—Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman, Marcel Broodthaers, Richard Serra, Sherrie Levine, and Robert Mapplethorpe—but those of critics and curators, of international exhibitions, and of new or refurbished museums such as the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart and the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. The essays: – Photographs at the End of Modernism. – On the Museum’s Ruins. – The Museum’s Old, the Library’s New Subject. – The End of Painting. – The Photographic Activity of Postmodernism. – Appropriating Appropriation. – Redefining Site Specificity. – This is Not a Museum of Art. – The Art of Exhibition. – The Postmodern Museum. About the Author Douglas Crimp is Fanny Knapp Allen Professor of Art History at the University of Rochester. He is the author of On the Museum’s Ruins and Melancholia and Moralism: Essays on AIDS and Queer Politics, both published by the MIT Press. Reviews “Literate and provocative speculations about art, photography, postmodernism, homoeroticism, Rauchenberg and Mapplethorpe, museums and libraries.” Endorsements “Crimp’s essays comprise one of the most interesting and incisive bodies of work on practices of contemporary art in relationships to art as institution.” —Andreas Huyssen, Columbia University Available today in the bookshop and via the website. #worldfoodbooks #douglascrimp #lousielawler

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