Photos and video with hashtag #carriemaeweems

#carriemaeweems

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- #CarrieMaeWeems 'Kitchen table series' #Repost @stancepodcast (@get_repost) ・・・ I posted this before but it just speaks to us so much! "I realized at a certain moment that I could not count on white men to construct images of myself that I would find appealing or useful or meaningful or complex. I can't count on anybody else but me to deliver on my own promise to myself. I love Fellini. I love Woody Allen. I love the Coen brothers, but they're not interested in my black ass. They're simply not interested. They have no sense that ... We don't even occur to them as subjects. We don't even occur to them as a viable fucking subject. Not to even say hi to. That's how distant we are from their fucking imaginations. I can't count on them to do my job. I just can't count on them. I can't count on them to play fair. I can't count on them to think about me in any sort of serious way, because it's clear that they don't. I look at it as unrequited love. You know? I love them, but they ain't thinking about me." - Carrie Mae Weems to Kimberly Drew in @lennyletter #art #carriemaeweems #photography #kitchentable #representation #instaart
- #CarrieMaeWeems & #39;Kitchen table series& #39; #Repost @stancepodcast @get_repost ) ・・・ I posted this before but it just speaks to us so much! "I realized at a certain moment that I could not count on white men to construct images of myself that I would find appealing or useful or meaningful or complex. I can& #39;t count on anybody else but me to deliver on my own promise to myself. I love Fellini. I love Woody Allen. I love the Coen brothers, but they& #39;re not interested in my black ass. They& #39;re simply not interested. They have no sense that ... We don& #39;t even occur to them as subjects. We don& #39;t even occur to them as a viable fucking subject. Not to even say hi to. That& #39;s how distant we are from their fucking imaginations. I can& #39;t count on them to do my job. I just can& #39;t count on them. I can& #39;t count on them to play fair. I can& #39;t count on them to think about me in any sort of serious way, because it& #39;s clear that they don& #39;t . I look at it as unrequited love. You know? I love them, but they ain& #39;t thinking about me." - Carrie Mae Weems to Kimberly Drew in @lennyletter #art #carriemaeweems #photography #kitchentable #representation #instaart
- #CarrieMaeWeems 'Kitchen table series' #Repost @stancepodcast (@get_repost) ・・・ I posted this before but it just speaks to us so much! "I realized at a certain moment that I could not count on white men to construct images of myself that I would find appealing or useful or meaningful or complex. I can't count on anybody else but me to deliver on my own promise to myself. I love Fellini. I love Woody Allen. I love the Coen brothers, but they're not interested in my black ass. They're simply not interested. They have no sense that ... We don't even occur to them as subjects. We don't even occur to them as a viable fucking subject. Not to even say hi to. That's how distant we are from their fucking imaginations. I can't count on them to do my job. I just can't count on them. I can't count on them to play fair. I can't count on them to think about me in any sort of serious way, because it's clear that they don't. I look at it as unrequited love. You know? I love them, but they ain't thinking about me." - Carrie Mae Weems to Kimberly Drew in @lennyletter #art #carriemaeweems #photography #kitchentable #representation #instaart
- The Kitchen Table Series by the incomparable @carriemaeweems | I always wanted prints of her seminal work - the coffee table book had a limited run as far as I know. I even paid homage to her work - tried to, at least, haha - in the documentary that I'm working on and had to frame a shot that mirrored this, the image is so powerful here. #blackicons #photography #classic #carriemaeweems #90s #legends #blackandwhite #love #maternal #light #design #history #quotes #kitchen #blackgirlmagic #family #mirror #perfect #summer #photographers
- The Kitchen Table Series by the incomparable @carriemaeweems | I always wanted prints of her seminal work - the coffee table book had a limited run as far as I know. I even paid homage to her work - tried to, at least, haha - in the documentary that I& #39;m working on and had to frame a shot that mirrored this, the image is so powerful here. #blackicons #photography #classic #carriemaeweems #90s #legends #blackandwhite #love #maternal #light #design #history #quotes #kitchen #blackgirlmagic #family #mirror #perfect #summer #photographers
- The Kitchen Table Series by the incomparable @carriemaeweems | I always wanted prints of her seminal work - the coffee table book had a limited run as far as I know. I even paid homage to her work - tried to, at least, haha - in the documentary that I'm working on and had to frame a shot that mirrored this, the image is so powerful here. #blackicons #photography #classic #carriemaeweems #90s #legends #blackandwhite #love #maternal #light #design #history #quotes #kitchen #blackgirlmagic #family #mirror #perfect #summer #photographers
- “Back in 1985, ’86, ’87, young women really had no sense of how to image themselves. And, black women had not been imaged in a way that I could appreciate, or admire . . . so, we were in this quandary.” – @carriemaeweems ______ In her diverse but largely photographic practice, contemporary artist Carrie Mae Weems probes the power structures that perpetuate notions of race, gender, and class and that continue to dictate aspects of personal identity and prevent social and political equality. In “Kitchen Table,” a series of Weems’ most iconic work, the viewer follows a woman as she experiences love, heartbreak, motherhood, and friendship through interactions with different figures and objects around the kitchen table. While Weems herself is the central figure, she argues for the universality of the character. “I use my body as a stand-in, but I never think of it as being about me. Rather, the character helps reveal something that is more complicated about the lives of women.” ______ 🎨 #CarrieMaeWeems. "Untitled (Woman and daughter with make-up)," from the series “Kitchen Table,” 1990, published 2010 by Light Work, Syracuse, NY; printed by Griffin Editions, New York. Gelatin silver print, 14 x 11 in. (35.4 x 27.9 cm). Collection of the Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College. Purchase, William G. Roehrick '34 Art Acquisition and Preservation Fund. © Carrie Mae Weems, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. 📷: John Bentham
- “Back in 1985, ’86, ’87, young women really had no sense of how to image themselves. And, black women had not been imaged in a way that I could appreciate, or admire . . . so, we were in this quandary.” – @carriemaeweems ______ In her diverse but largely photographic practice, contemporary artist Carrie Mae Weems probes the power structures that perpetuate notions of race, gender, and class and that continue to dictate aspects of personal identity and prevent social and political equality. In “Kitchen Table,” a series of Weems’ most iconic work, the viewer follows a woman as she experiences love, heartbreak, motherhood, and friendship through interactions with different figures and objects around the kitchen table. While Weems herself is the central figure, she argues for the universality of the character. “I use my body as a stand-in, but I never think of it as being about me. Rather, the character helps reveal something that is more complicated about the lives of women.” ______ 🎨 #CarrieMaeWeems . "Untitled (Woman and daughter with make-up)," from the series “Kitchen Table,” 1990, published 2010 by Light Work, Syracuse, NY; printed by Griffin Editions, New York. Gelatin silver print, 14 x 11 in. (35.4 x 27.9 cm). Collection of the Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College. Purchase, William G. Roehrick & #39;34 Art Acquisition and Preservation Fund. © Carrie Mae Weems, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. 📷: John Bentham
- “Back in 1985, ’86, ’87, young women really had no sense of how to image themselves. And, black women had not been imaged in a way that I could appreciate, or admire . . . so, we were in this quandary.” – @carriemaeweems ______ In her diverse but largely photographic practice, contemporary artist Carrie Mae Weems probes the power structures that perpetuate notions of race, gender, and class and that continue to dictate aspects of personal identity and prevent social and political equality. In “Kitchen Table,” a series of Weems’ most iconic work, the viewer follows a woman as she experiences love, heartbreak, motherhood, and friendship through interactions with different figures and objects around the kitchen table. While Weems herself is the central figure, she argues for the universality of the character. “I use my body as a stand-in, but I never think of it as being about me. Rather, the character helps reveal something that is more complicated about the lives of women.” ______ 🎨 #CarrieMaeWeems. "Untitled (Woman and daughter with make-up)," from the series “Kitchen Table,” 1990, published 2010 by Light Work, Syracuse, NY; printed by Griffin Editions, New York. Gelatin silver print, 14 x 11 in. (35.4 x 27.9 cm). Collection of the Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College. Purchase, William G. Roehrick '34 Art Acquisition and Preservation Fund. © Carrie Mae Weems, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. 📷: John Bentham
- What’s been made very visible in our country now – the torches, the shields, the hatred, the racism, sexism, transphobia, xenophobia – is no revelation for most people of color. Probably the only thing that surprises communities of color is white people’s surprise, our shock, our newly found outrage. They’ve been talking about and fighting against racism and white supremacy and violence for decades now. In her series, “From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried” (1995-1996), Carrie Mae Weems (@carriemaeweems) altered photographs taken in the 19th century, including the daguerreotypes of enslaved people commissioned by Agassiz. Weems photographed and enlarged each image. She used a red filter when reprinting them. She placed each print in a circular mat and framed it under glass she’d sandblasted with text. Over an image of Delia (a woman whose dress was forced down by the photographer and/or by slavers to expose her breasts) Weems wrote these words: “You became a scientific profile.” These re-made images offer resources for thinking through what it means to look at a photograph taken to do violence to its subject. How should viewers look at such images? Lynching photographs? Torture photographs? Weems offers the subjects of such images cover, tending, reparation – and yet she forces her viewers to see the violence of slavery, of using photography to try to prove inferiority, of ongoing and systemic racism. I have not shown that image of Delia here. I don’t feel like I have a right to show it on social media. Not today. If you want to see it, you can look it up. I have chosen instead to show one image from Weems’s “Kitchen Table Series” (1990). I first saw that series when it was on exhibit at the Portland Art Museum several years ago. I couldn’t stop looking. And crying. Beautiful images of ordinary life. Intimate. Loving gestures. Solitude. Strength. This post is part of a series celebrating artists whose work inspired DRAW YOUR WEAPONS. Every Friday I post about a different artist. Next week: @wafaabilal. #drawyourweapons #endwhitesupremacy #carriemaeweems
- What’s been made very visible in our country now – the torches, the shields, the hatred, the racism, sexism, transphobia, xenophobia – is no revelation for most people of color. Probably the only thing that surprises communities of color is white people’s surprise, our shock, our newly found outrage. They’ve been talking about and fighting against racism and white supremacy and violence for decades now. In her series, “From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried” (1995-1996), Carrie Mae Weems @carriemaeweems ) altered photographs taken in the 19th century, including the daguerreotypes of enslaved people commissioned by Agassiz. Weems photographed and enlarged each image. She used a red filter when reprinting them. She placed each print in a circular mat and framed it under glass she’d sandblasted with text. Over an image of Delia (a woman whose dress was forced down by the photographer and/or by slavers to expose her breasts) Weems wrote these words: “You became a scientific profile.” These re-made images offer resources for thinking through what it means to look at a photograph taken to do violence to its subject. How should viewers look at such images? Lynching photographs? Torture photographs? Weems offers the subjects of such images cover, tending, reparation – and yet she forces her viewers to see the violence of slavery, of using photography to try to prove inferiority, of ongoing and systemic racism. I have not shown that image of Delia here. I don’t feel like I have a right to show it on social media. Not today. If you want to see it, you can look it up. I have chosen instead to show one image from Weems’s “Kitchen Table Series” (1990). I first saw that series when it was on exhibit at the Portland Art Museum several years ago. I couldn’t stop looking. And crying. Beautiful images of ordinary life. Intimate. Loving gestures. Solitude. Strength. This post is part of a series celebrating artists whose work inspired DRAW YOUR WEAPONS. Every Friday I post about a different artist. Next week: @wafaabilal. #drawyourweapons #endwhitesupremacy #carriemaeweems
- What’s been made very visible in our country now – the torches, the shields, the hatred, the racism, sexism, transphobia, xenophobia – is no revelation for most people of color. Probably the only thing that surprises communities of color is white people’s surprise, our shock, our newly found outrage. They’ve been talking about and fighting against racism and white supremacy and violence for decades now. In her series, “From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried” (1995-1996), Carrie Mae Weems (@carriemaeweems) altered photographs taken in the 19th century, including the daguerreotypes of enslaved people commissioned by Agassiz. Weems photographed and enlarged each image. She used a red filter when reprinting them. She placed each print in a circular mat and framed it under glass she’d sandblasted with text. Over an image of Delia (a woman whose dress was forced down by the photographer and/or by slavers to expose her breasts) Weems wrote these words: “You became a scientific profile.” These re-made images offer resources for thinking through what it means to look at a photograph taken to do violence to its subject. How should viewers look at such images? Lynching photographs? Torture photographs? Weems offers the subjects of such images cover, tending, reparation – and yet she forces her viewers to see the violence of slavery, of using photography to try to prove inferiority, of ongoing and systemic racism. I have not shown that image of Delia here. I don’t feel like I have a right to show it on social media. Not today. If you want to see it, you can look it up. I have chosen instead to show one image from Weems’s “Kitchen Table Series” (1990). I first saw that series when it was on exhibit at the Portland Art Museum several years ago. I couldn’t stop looking. And crying. Beautiful images of ordinary life. Intimate. Loving gestures. Solitude. Strength. This post is part of a series celebrating artists whose work inspired DRAW YOUR WEAPONS. Every Friday I post about a different artist. Next week: @wafaabilal. #drawyourweapons #endwhitesupremacy #carriemaeweems
- #CarrieMaeWeems’s “Blue Black Boy” (1997), part of “Blue Black,” an exhibition curated by the artist #GlennLigon at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis. Credit Jack Shainman, New York⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ ⠀ #art #art🎨#artshow #artlife #artofvisuals #artist #artoftheday #artcollective #artwork #artstagram #artsy #contemporaryart #modernart #photography #photo #photooftheday #artsy #painting #art_spotlight #artistoninstagram #artgallery #artlovers #arts #interiors #interiordesign #modernhome #architecture
- #CarrieMaeWeems ’s “Blue Black Boy” (1997), part of “Blue Black,” an exhibition curated by the artist #GlennLigon at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis. Credit Jack Shainman, New York⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ ⠀ #art #art #artshow #artlife #artofvisuals #artist #artoftheday #artcollective #artwork #artstagram #artsy #contemporaryart #modernart #photography #photo #photooftheday #artsy #painting #art_spotlight #artistoninstagram #artgallery #artlovers #arts #interiors #interiordesign #modernhome #architecture
- #CarrieMaeWeems’s “Blue Black Boy” (1997), part of “Blue Black,” an exhibition curated by the artist #GlennLigon at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis. Credit Jack Shainman, New York⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ ⠀ #art #art🎨#artshow #artlife #artofvisuals #artist #artoftheday #artcollective #artwork #artstagram #artsy #contemporaryart #modernart #photography #photo #photooftheday #artsy #painting #art_spotlight #artistoninstagram #artgallery #artlovers #arts #interiors #interiordesign #modernhome #architecture
- Some Said You Were the Spitting Image of Evil, 1995-96. From the series From Here I Saw What Happened And I Cried. Carrie Mae Weems. #CarrieMaeWeems #augustart2017migration #MoMA "With From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried, Carrie Mae Weems reveals how photography has played a key role throughout history in shaping and supporting racism, stereotyping, and social injustice. This installation is comprised of appropriated photographs of slaves in the American South and other 19th- and 20th-century photographs of Africans and African Americans that the artist found in museum and university archives. Among the photographs she selected were daguerreotypes commissioned in 1850 by Swiss naturalist Louis Agassiz, who traveled through the American South with a photographer, making portraits of slaves. Agassiz intended to use these portraits as visual evidence to support his theories of the racial inferiority of Africans, and to prepare a taxonomy of physical types in the slave population. “When we’re looking at these images,” Weems has said, “we’re looking at the ways in which Anglo America—white America—saw itself in relationship to the black subject. I wanted to intervene in that by giving a voice to a subject that historically has had no voice.” -MoMA.org
- Some Said You Were the Spitting Image of Evil, 1995-96. From the series From Here I Saw What Happened And I Cried. Carrie Mae Weems. #CarrieMaeWeems #augustart2017migration #MoMA "With From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried, Carrie Mae Weems reveals how photography has played a key role throughout history in shaping and supporting racism, stereotyping, and social injustice. This installation is comprised of appropriated photographs of slaves in the American South and other 19th- and 20th-century photographs of Africans and African Americans that the artist found in museum and university archives. Among the photographs she selected were daguerreotypes commissioned in 1850 by Swiss naturalist Louis Agassiz, who traveled through the American South with a photographer, making portraits of slaves. Agassiz intended to use these portraits as visual evidence to support his theories of the racial inferiority of Africans, and to prepare a taxonomy of physical types in the slave population. “When we’re looking at these images,” Weems has said, “we’re looking at the ways in which Anglo America—white America—saw itself in relationship to the black subject. I wanted to intervene in that by giving a voice to a subject that historically has had no voice.” -MoMA.org
- Some Said You Were the Spitting Image of Evil, 1995-96. From the series From Here I Saw What Happened And I Cried. Carrie Mae Weems. #CarrieMaeWeems #augustart2017migration #MoMA "With From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried, Carrie Mae Weems reveals how photography has played a key role throughout history in shaping and supporting racism, stereotyping, and social injustice. This installation is comprised of appropriated photographs of slaves in the American South and other 19th- and 20th-century photographs of Africans and African Americans that the artist found in museum and university archives. Among the photographs she selected were daguerreotypes commissioned in 1850 by Swiss naturalist Louis Agassiz, who traveled through the American South with a photographer, making portraits of slaves. Agassiz intended to use these portraits as visual evidence to support his theories of the racial inferiority of Africans, and to prepare a taxonomy of physical types in the slave population. “When we’re looking at these images,” Weems has said, “we’re looking at the ways in which Anglo America—white America—saw itself in relationship to the black subject. I wanted to intervene in that by giving a voice to a subject that historically has had no voice.” -MoMA.org
- The David Winton Bell Gallery in List Art Center has released its 2017-2018 schedule of exhibits. Here are the names and dates of some really exciting upcoming shows! @carriemaeweems @camilleseaman @richard_fishman . . . #art #artist #making #wip #artproject #sculpture #installation #performanceart #collaboration #performance #interns #brownartsinitiative #brownu #brownuniversity #carriemaeweems #melvinedwards #jacobkirkegaard #camilleseaman #olafottobecker #richardfishman #artgallery #artshow #upcoming #upcomingshow #upcomingexhibition #groupshow
- The David Winton Bell Gallery in List Art Center has released its 2017-2018 schedule of exhibits. Here are the names and dates of some really exciting upcoming shows! @carriemaeweems @camilleseaman @richard_fishman . . . #art #artist #making #wip #artproject #sculpture #installation #performanceart #collaboration #performance #interns #brownartsinitiative #brownu #brownuniversity #carriemaeweems #melvinedwards #jacobkirkegaard #camilleseaman #olafottobecker #richardfishman #artgallery #artshow #upcoming #upcomingshow #upcomingexhibition #groupshow

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