Photos and video with hashtag #5womenartists

#5womenartists

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- via @vanartgallery In 2002, Paul Wong recorded Rebecca Belmore’s intensely powerful work “Vigil” when she performed it at the Talking Stick Festival in Vancouver. Eight years after the original performance, Wong edited the excerpts for his video work “Vigil 5.4.” Belmore’s performance commemorates the missing and murdered Indigenous women from Vancouver. In particular she addresses the women killed by serial killer Robert Pickton. In the performance, done on the Downtown Eastside, Belmore enacts various rituals--scrubbing the streets and lighting votive candles. In the video she is seen repeatedly nailing a red dress to a telephone pole and then tearing it off in an effort to escape her confinement. She does so repeatedly until the artist is left standing on the street clad in only her underwear. Summoning the power of naming, Belmore then calls out the names of the known victims of Pickton, as if to assure the women they will not be forgotten. … Image: Installation view of Paul Wong’s “Vigil 5.4” in “Picture From Here,” exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery from May 19 to September 4, 2017. … @paulwongprojects #PaulWong #RebeccaBelmore #Vigil #Vigil5.4 #TalkingStickFestival #VancouverArtGallery #MusicMW #MuseumWeek @museumweek #WomenMW #videoart #performanceart #NationalAboriginalDay #NationalIndigenousPeoplesDay2017 #5womenartists #Indigenousart #ArtMakesUs #powerofart #artoftheday
- via @vanartgallery In 2002, Paul Wong recorded Rebecca Belmore’s intensely powerful work “Vigil” when she performed it at the Talking Stick Festival in Vancouver. Eight years after the original performance, Wong edited the excerpts for his video work “Vigil 5.4.” Belmore’s performance commemorates the missing and murdered Indigenous women from Vancouver. In particular she addresses the women killed by serial killer Robert Pickton. In the performance, done on the Downtown Eastside, Belmore enacts various rituals--scrubbing the streets and lighting votive candles. In the video she is seen repeatedly nailing a red dress to a telephone pole and then tearing it off in an effort to escape her confinement. She does so repeatedly until the artist is left standing on the street clad in only her underwear. Summoning the power of naming, Belmore then calls out the names of the known victims of Pickton, as if to assure the women they will not be forgotten. … Image: Installation view of Paul Wong’s “Vigil 5.4” in “Picture From Here,” exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery from May 19 to September 4, 2017. … @paulwongprojects #PaulWong #RebeccaBelmore #Vigil #Vigil5 .4 #TalkingStickFestival #VancouverArtGallery #MusicMW #MuseumWeek @museumweek #WomenMW #videoart #performanceart #NationalAboriginalDay #NationalIndigenousPeoplesDay2017 #5womenartists #Indigenousart #ArtMakesUs #powerofart #artoftheday
- via @vanartgallery In 2002, Paul Wong recorded Rebecca Belmore’s intensely powerful work “Vigil” when she performed it at the Talking Stick Festival in Vancouver. Eight years after the original performance, Wong edited the excerpts for his video work “Vigil 5.4.” Belmore’s performance commemorates the missing and murdered Indigenous women from Vancouver. In particular she addresses the women killed by serial killer Robert Pickton. In the performance, done on the Downtown Eastside, Belmore enacts various rituals--scrubbing the streets and lighting votive candles. In the video she is seen repeatedly nailing a red dress to a telephone pole and then tearing it off in an effort to escape her confinement. She does so repeatedly until the artist is left standing on the street clad in only her underwear. Summoning the power of naming, Belmore then calls out the names of the known victims of Pickton, as if to assure the women they will not be forgotten. … Image: Installation view of Paul Wong’s “Vigil 5.4” in “Picture From Here,” exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery from May 19 to September 4, 2017. … @paulwongprojects #PaulWong #RebeccaBelmore #Vigil #Vigil5.4 #TalkingStickFestival #VancouverArtGallery #MusicMW #MuseumWeek @museumweek #WomenMW #videoart #performanceart #NationalAboriginalDay #NationalIndigenousPeoplesDay2017 #5womenartists #Indigenousart #ArtMakesUs #powerofart #artoftheday
- Mary Cassatt (1844- 1926) Additional info and works at #marycassett #marycassetthuop. More portraits of female artists at #artistasawoman 📌Her father, a Pittsburg banker, had said that he would rather see her dead than become an artist. Nonetheless, Mary Cassett studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and travelled extensively in Europe, finally settling in Paris. 📌In 1872 her first painting was accepted into Paris Salon, where it was criticized by being too brightly colored and too realistic. In 1877 she was rejected by the Salon, but was invited by Edgar Degas to show her works with the impressionists. 📌Cassatt became an active member of Impressionists circle, painting mostly in pastels, like her lifelong friend and mentor Degas. 📌The 1890s were Cassett's busiest and most creative time. She became a role model for young American artists who sought her advise.
- Mary Cassatt (1844- 1926) Additional info and works at #marycassett #marycassetthuop . More portraits of female artists at #artistasawoman 📌Her father, a Pittsburg banker, had said that he would rather see her dead than become an artist. Nonetheless, Mary Cassett studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and travelled extensively in Europe, finally settling in Paris. 📌In 1872 her first painting was accepted into Paris Salon, where it was criticized by being too brightly colored and too realistic. In 1877 she was rejected by the Salon, but was invited by Edgar Degas to show her works with the impressionists. 📌Cassatt became an active member of Impressionists circle, painting mostly in pastels, like her lifelong friend and mentor Degas. 📌The 1890s were Cassett& #39;s busiest and most creative time. She became a role model for young American artists who sought her advise.
- Mary Cassatt (1844- 1926) Additional info and works at #marycassett #marycassetthuop. More portraits of female artists at #artistasawoman 📌Her father, a Pittsburg banker, had said that he would rather see her dead than become an artist. Nonetheless, Mary Cassett studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and travelled extensively in Europe, finally settling in Paris. 📌In 1872 her first painting was accepted into Paris Salon, where it was criticized by being too brightly colored and too realistic. In 1877 she was rejected by the Salon, but was invited by Edgar Degas to show her works with the impressionists. 📌Cassatt became an active member of Impressionists circle, painting mostly in pastels, like her lifelong friend and mentor Degas. 📌The 1890s were Cassett's busiest and most creative time. She became a role model for young American artists who sought her advise.
- Vancouver-based artist Marian Penner Bancroft uses innovative modes of presentation to deliberately draw attention to the photograph as an object and the viewer’s physical relationship to the work. By coming off the wall, so to speak, Bancroft's work draws attention to the way an image’s meaning is constructed and received. ... "Spiritland/Octopus Books 4th Avenue" (1987), on view in #PicturesFromHere until Sept 4, references an alternative bookstore, which closed in 1987, that played an important role in Vancouver’s literary scene. Hung side-by-side and overlapping, the images create an urban panorama of sorts that focuses on a desolate vacant lot where the bookstore once stood, suggesting what has come to be known as the “defeatured landscape.” These photographs are accompanied by an excerpt from Jack Spicer’s poem "Imaginary Elegies," which refers to Plato’s "Allegory of the Cave" in which prisoners chained to the wall of a cave mistake shadows for reality. The allegory is an important reference in Susan Sontag’s seminal essay "On Photography," in which she argues that, like shadows in a cave, photographic images have come to be taken for reality in the contemporary world. ... Image: Marian Penner Bancroft, spiritland/Octopus Books, Fourth Avenue, 1987, silver gelatin print, Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program and the Vancouver Art Gallery Acquisition Fund, VAG 2013.8.1 a-e, Photo: Rachel Topham, Vancouver Art Gallery … #PicturesFromHere #MuseumWeek #BooksMW #WomenMW #MarianPennerBancroft #Spiritland #OctopusBooks #VanArtCollection #5WomenArtists #defeaturedlandscape #SusanSontag #Plato #literatureinart @museumweek #Vancouverhistory #photography #vancouverphotographer #urbanpanorama #contemporaryart #onphotography
- Vancouver-based artist Marian Penner Bancroft uses innovative modes of presentation to deliberately draw attention to the photograph as an object and the viewer’s physical relationship to the work. By coming off the wall, so to speak, Bancroft& #39;s work draws attention to the way an image’s meaning is constructed and received. ... "Spiritland/Octopus Books 4th Avenue" (1987), on view in #PicturesFromHere until Sept 4, references an alternative bookstore, which closed in 1987, that played an important role in Vancouver’s literary scene. Hung side-by-side and overlapping, the images create an urban panorama of sorts that focuses on a desolate vacant lot where the bookstore once stood, suggesting what has come to be known as the “defeatured landscape.” These photographs are accompanied by an excerpt from Jack Spicer’s poem "Imaginary Elegies," which refers to Plato’s "Allegory of the Cave" in which prisoners chained to the wall of a cave mistake shadows for reality. The allegory is an important reference in Susan Sontag’s seminal essay "On Photography," in which she argues that, like shadows in a cave, photographic images have come to be taken for reality in the contemporary world. ... Image: Marian Penner Bancroft, spiritland/Octopus Books, Fourth Avenue, 1987, silver gelatin print, Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program and the Vancouver Art Gallery Acquisition Fund, VAG 2013.8.1 a-e, Photo: Rachel Topham, Vancouver Art Gallery … #PicturesFromHere #MuseumWeek #BooksMW #WomenMW #MarianPennerBancroft #Spiritland #OctopusBooks #VanArtCollection #5WomenArtists #defeaturedlandscape #SusanSontag #Plato #literatureinart @museumweek #Vancouverhistory #photography #vancouverphotographer #urbanpanorama #contemporaryart #onphotography
- Vancouver-based artist Marian Penner Bancroft uses innovative modes of presentation to deliberately draw attention to the photograph as an object and the viewer’s physical relationship to the work. By coming off the wall, so to speak, Bancroft's work draws attention to the way an image’s meaning is constructed and received. ... "Spiritland/Octopus Books 4th Avenue" (1987), on view in #PicturesFromHere until Sept 4, references an alternative bookstore, which closed in 1987, that played an important role in Vancouver’s literary scene. Hung side-by-side and overlapping, the images create an urban panorama of sorts that focuses on a desolate vacant lot where the bookstore once stood, suggesting what has come to be known as the “defeatured landscape.” These photographs are accompanied by an excerpt from Jack Spicer’s poem "Imaginary Elegies," which refers to Plato’s "Allegory of the Cave" in which prisoners chained to the wall of a cave mistake shadows for reality. The allegory is an important reference in Susan Sontag’s seminal essay "On Photography," in which she argues that, like shadows in a cave, photographic images have come to be taken for reality in the contemporary world. ... Image: Marian Penner Bancroft, spiritland/Octopus Books, Fourth Avenue, 1987, silver gelatin print, Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program and the Vancouver Art Gallery Acquisition Fund, VAG 2013.8.1 a-e, Photo: Rachel Topham, Vancouver Art Gallery … #PicturesFromHere #MuseumWeek #BooksMW #WomenMW #MarianPennerBancroft #Spiritland #OctopusBooks #VanArtCollection #5WomenArtists #defeaturedlandscape #SusanSontag #Plato #literatureinart @museumweek #Vancouverhistory #photography #vancouverphotographer #urbanpanorama #contemporaryart #onphotography
- Cornelia Wyngaarden and Andrea Fatona's "Hogan’s Alley" (1994) is a video documenting the previously unrecorded history of Vancouver’s Black community, focusing on the area of the city once known as Hogan’s Alley. The work examines the lives of three women from the area as they recount their individual stories: Thelma Gibson, an African-Caribbean dancer; Pearl Brown, a well-known jazz singer; and Leah Curtis, a lesbian in her mid-forties. Each of their narratives speak to the complexities of identity, gender, race and sexuality as bound to the history of the neighbourhood. Alongside each woman’s individual history, the work chronicles a now disappeared history and dispersed community. ... Watch Wyngaarden and Fontana's film in full in #PicturesFromHere, on view until September 4. ... Image: Installation view of Cornelia Wyngaarden and Andrea Fatona's "Hogan's Alley" (1994) in "Pictures From Here," exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery from May 19 to September 4, 2017, Photo: Rachel Topham, Vancouver Art Gallery ... #MuseumWeek #WomenMW #StoriesMW #MuseumWeek2017 #BlackStrathcona #Vancouverhistory #corneliawyngaarden #andreafantona #videoart #installation #artexhibition #5womenartists #musesocial
- Cornelia Wyngaarden and Andrea Fatona& #39;s "Hogan’s Alley" (1994) is a video documenting the previously unrecorded history of Vancouver’s Black community, focusing on the area of the city once known as Hogan’s Alley. The work examines the lives of three women from the area as they recount their individual stories: Thelma Gibson, an African-Caribbean dancer; Pearl Brown, a well-known jazz singer; and Leah Curtis, a lesbian in her mid-forties. Each of their narratives speak to the complexities of identity, gender, race and sexuality as bound to the history of the neighbourhood. Alongside each woman’s individual history, the work chronicles a now disappeared history and dispersed community. ... Watch Wyngaarden and Fontana& #39;s film in full in #PicturesFromHere , on view until September 4. ... Image: Installation view of Cornelia Wyngaarden and Andrea Fatona& #39;s "Hogan& #39;s Alley" (1994) in "Pictures From Here," exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery from May 19 to September 4, 2017, Photo: Rachel Topham, Vancouver Art Gallery ... #MuseumWeek #WomenMW #StoriesMW #MuseumWeek2017 #BlackStrathcona #Vancouverhistory #corneliawyngaarden #andreafantona #videoart #installation #artexhibition #5womenartists #musesocial
- Cornelia Wyngaarden and Andrea Fatona's "Hogan’s Alley" (1994) is a video documenting the previously unrecorded history of Vancouver’s Black community, focusing on the area of the city once known as Hogan’s Alley. The work examines the lives of three women from the area as they recount their individual stories: Thelma Gibson, an African-Caribbean dancer; Pearl Brown, a well-known jazz singer; and Leah Curtis, a lesbian in her mid-forties. Each of their narratives speak to the complexities of identity, gender, race and sexuality as bound to the history of the neighbourhood. Alongside each woman’s individual history, the work chronicles a now disappeared history and dispersed community. ... Watch Wyngaarden and Fontana's film in full in #PicturesFromHere, on view until September 4. ... Image: Installation view of Cornelia Wyngaarden and Andrea Fatona's "Hogan's Alley" (1994) in "Pictures From Here," exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery from May 19 to September 4, 2017, Photo: Rachel Topham, Vancouver Art Gallery ... #MuseumWeek #WomenMW #StoriesMW #MuseumWeek2017 #BlackStrathcona #Vancouverhistory #corneliawyngaarden #andreafantona #videoart #installation #artexhibition #5womenartists #musesocial
- regram @sartleseeartdifferently Wangechi Mutu was born #OTD in 1972. She makes art directed at science fiction nerds everywhere. Mutu comments on current social issues such as race, gender, and power dynamics using cyborgs, goddesses and other fantastical creatures. Known best for her collage work, the Kenyan born artist collects pics from “illustrated medical texts, fashion glossies, ethnographic periodicals like National Geographic, and pornography.” Her work addresses stereotyping and hybridity in the most wonderfully weird way. . . . . . . . ​#arthistory #instamuseum #culturegram #historyofart #museumlove #arthistorynerd #art #womanartist #wangechimutu #blackart #artmuseum #5womenartists #femaleartist #contemporaryart
- regram @sartleseeartdifferently Wangechi Mutu was born #OTD in 1972. She makes art directed at science fiction nerds everywhere. Mutu comments on current social issues such as race, gender, and power dynamics using cyborgs, goddesses and other fantastical creatures. Known best for her collage work, the Kenyan born artist collects pics from “illustrated medical texts, fashion glossies, ethnographic periodicals like National Geographic, and pornography.” Her work addresses stereotyping and hybridity in the most wonderfully weird way. . . . . . . . #arthistory #instamuseum #culturegram #historyofart #museumlove #arthistorynerd #art #womanartist #wangechimutu #blackart #artmuseum #5womenartists #femaleartist #contemporaryart
- regram @sartleseeartdifferently Wangechi Mutu was born #OTD in 1972. She makes art directed at science fiction nerds everywhere. Mutu comments on current social issues such as race, gender, and power dynamics using cyborgs, goddesses and other fantastical creatures. Known best for her collage work, the Kenyan born artist collects pics from “illustrated medical texts, fashion glossies, ethnographic periodicals like National Geographic, and pornography.” Her work addresses stereotyping and hybridity in the most wonderfully weird way. . . . . . . . ​#arthistory #instamuseum #culturegram #historyofart #museumlove #arthistorynerd #art #womanartist #wangechimutu #blackart #artmuseum #5womenartists #femaleartist #contemporaryart
- Wangechi Mutu was born #OTD in 1972. She makes art directed at science fiction nerds everywhere. Mutu comments on current social issues such as race, gender, and power dynamics using cyborgs, goddesses and other fantastical creatures. Known best for her collage work, the Kenyan born artist collects pics from “illustrated medical texts, fashion glossies, ethnographic periodicals like National Geographic, and pornography.” Her work addresses stereotyping and hybridity in the most wonderfully weird way. . . . . . . . ​#arthistory #instamuseum #culturegram #historyofart #museumlove #arthistorynerd #art #womanartist #wangechimutu #blackart #artmuseum #5womenartists #femaleartist #contemporaryart
- Wangechi Mutu was born #OTD in 1972. She makes art directed at science fiction nerds everywhere. Mutu comments on current social issues such as race, gender, and power dynamics using cyborgs, goddesses and other fantastical creatures. Known best for her collage work, the Kenyan born artist collects pics from “illustrated medical texts, fashion glossies, ethnographic periodicals like National Geographic, and pornography.” Her work addresses stereotyping and hybridity in the most wonderfully weird way. . . . . . . . #arthistory #instamuseum #culturegram #historyofart #museumlove #arthistorynerd #art #womanartist #wangechimutu #blackart #artmuseum #5womenartists #femaleartist #contemporaryart
- Wangechi Mutu was born #OTD in 1972. She makes art directed at science fiction nerds everywhere. Mutu comments on current social issues such as race, gender, and power dynamics using cyborgs, goddesses and other fantastical creatures. Known best for her collage work, the Kenyan born artist collects pics from “illustrated medical texts, fashion glossies, ethnographic periodicals like National Geographic, and pornography.” Her work addresses stereotyping and hybridity in the most wonderfully weird way. . . . . . . . ​#arthistory #instamuseum #culturegram #historyofart #museumlove #arthistorynerd #art #womanartist #wangechimutu #blackart #artmuseum #5womenartists #femaleartist #contemporaryart
- #Repost @vanartgallery (@get_repost) ・・・ In 2002, Paul Wong recorded Rebecca Belmore’s intensely powerful work “Vigil” when she performed it at the Talking Stick Festival in Vancouver. Eight years after the original performance, Wong edited the excerpts for his video work “Vigil 5.4.” ... Belmore’s performance commemorates the missing and murdered Indigenous women from Vancouver. In particular she addresses the women killed by serial killer Robert Pickton. Performed on the Downtown Eastside, Belmore enacts various rituals--scrubbing the streets and lighting votive candles. In the video she is seen repeatedly nailing a red dress to a telephone pole and then tearing it off in an effort to escape her confinement. She does so repeatedly until the artist is left standing on the street clad in only her underwear. Summoning the power of naming, Belmore then calls out the names of the known victims of Pickton, as if to assure the women they will not be forgotten. … Image: Installation view of Paul Wong’s “Vigil 5.4” in “Pictures From Here,” exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery from May 19 to September 4, 2017. … #PicturesFromHere @paulwongprojects #PaulWong #RebeccaBelmore #Vigil #Vigil5.4 #TalkingStickFestival #VancouverArtGallery #MusicMW #MuseumWeek @museumweek #WomenMW #videoart #performanceart #NationalAboriginalDay #NationalIndigenousPeoplesDay #5womenartists #Indigenousart #ArtMakesUs #powerofart #artoftheday
- #Repost @vanartgallery @get_repost ) ・・・ In 2002, Paul Wong recorded Rebecca Belmore’s intensely powerful work “Vigil” when she performed it at the Talking Stick Festival in Vancouver. Eight years after the original performance, Wong edited the excerpts for his video work “Vigil 5.4.” ... Belmore’s performance commemorates the missing and murdered Indigenous women from Vancouver. In particular she addresses the women killed by serial killer Robert Pickton. Performed on the Downtown Eastside, Belmore enacts various rituals--scrubbing the streets and lighting votive candles. In the video she is seen repeatedly nailing a red dress to a telephone pole and then tearing it off in an effort to escape her confinement. She does so repeatedly until the artist is left standing on the street clad in only her underwear. Summoning the power of naming, Belmore then calls out the names of the known victims of Pickton, as if to assure the women they will not be forgotten. … Image: Installation view of Paul Wong’s “Vigil 5.4” in “Pictures From Here,” exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery from May 19 to September 4, 2017. … #PicturesFromHere @paulwongprojects #PaulWong #RebeccaBelmore #Vigil #Vigil5 .4 #TalkingStickFestival #VancouverArtGallery #MusicMW #MuseumWeek @museumweek #WomenMW #videoart #performanceart #NationalAboriginalDay #NationalIndigenousPeoplesDay #5womenartists #Indigenousart #ArtMakesUs #powerofart #artoftheday
- #Repost @vanartgallery (@get_repost) ・・・ In 2002, Paul Wong recorded Rebecca Belmore’s intensely powerful work “Vigil” when she performed it at the Talking Stick Festival in Vancouver. Eight years after the original performance, Wong edited the excerpts for his video work “Vigil 5.4.” ... Belmore’s performance commemorates the missing and murdered Indigenous women from Vancouver. In particular she addresses the women killed by serial killer Robert Pickton. Performed on the Downtown Eastside, Belmore enacts various rituals--scrubbing the streets and lighting votive candles. In the video she is seen repeatedly nailing a red dress to a telephone pole and then tearing it off in an effort to escape her confinement. She does so repeatedly until the artist is left standing on the street clad in only her underwear. Summoning the power of naming, Belmore then calls out the names of the known victims of Pickton, as if to assure the women they will not be forgotten. … Image: Installation view of Paul Wong’s “Vigil 5.4” in “Pictures From Here,” exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery from May 19 to September 4, 2017. … #PicturesFromHere @paulwongprojects #PaulWong #RebeccaBelmore #Vigil #Vigil5.4 #TalkingStickFestival #VancouverArtGallery #MusicMW #MuseumWeek @museumweek #WomenMW #videoart #performanceart #NationalAboriginalDay #NationalIndigenousPeoplesDay #5womenartists #Indigenousart #ArtMakesUs #powerofart #artoftheday
- Mithila painting, as a domestic ritual activity, was unknown to the outside world until the massive Bihar earthquake of 1934. House walls had tumbled down, and the British colonial officer in Madhubani District, William G. Archer, inspecting the damage "discovered" the paintings on the newly exposed interior walls of homes. Archer - later to become the South Asia Curator at London's Victoria and Albert Museum - was stunned by the beauty of the paintings and similarities to the work of modern Western artists like Klee, Miro, and Picasso. During the 1930s he took black and white photos of some of these paintings, the earliest images we have of them. Then in a 1949 article in the Indian art journal, Marg, he brought the wall paintings to public attention. Then a second natural disaster, a severe draught in the late 1960s, prompted the All India Handicrafts Board to encourage a few upper caste women in villages around Madhubani town to transfer their ritual wall paintings to paper as an income generating project. Drawing on the region's rich visual culture, contrasting "line painting" and "color painting" traditions, and their individual talents, several of these women turned out to be superb artists. Four of them were soon representing India in cultural fairs in Europe, Russia, and the USA. Their national and international recognition prompted many other women from many other castes - including harijans or dalits, the ex-"untouchables" - to begin painting on paper as well. By the late 1970s, the popular success of the paintings - aesthetically distinct from other Indian painting traditions - was drawing dealers from New Delhi offering minimal prices for mass produced paintings of the most popular divinities and three familiar scenes from the Ramayana. Out of poverty, many painters complied with the dealers' demands, and produced the rapid and repetitious images known as "Madhubani paintings." Nevertheless, with the encouragement of a number of outsiders - both Indian and foreign - other artists working within the same aesthetic traditions continued to produce the highly crafted, deeply individual and increasingly diverse work, now known as "Mithila Painting." 👇
- Mithila painting, as a domestic ritual activity, was unknown to the outside world until the massive Bihar earthquake of 1934. House walls had tumbled down, and the British colonial officer in Madhubani District, William G. Archer, inspecting the damage "discovered" the paintings on the newly exposed interior walls of homes. Archer - later to become the South Asia Curator at London& #39;s Victoria and Albert Museum - was stunned by the beauty of the paintings and similarities to the work of modern Western artists like Klee, Miro, and Picasso. During the 1930s he took black and white photos of some of these paintings, the earliest images we have of them. Then in a 1949 article in the Indian art journal, Marg, he brought the wall paintings to public attention. Then a second natural disaster, a severe draught in the late 1960s, prompted the All India Handicrafts Board to encourage a few upper caste women in villages around Madhubani town to transfer their ritual wall paintings to paper as an income generating project. Drawing on the region& #39;s rich visual culture, contrasting "line painting" and "color painting" traditions, and their individual talents, several of these women turned out to be superb artists. Four of them were soon representing India in cultural fairs in Europe, Russia, and the USA. Their national and international recognition prompted many other women from many other castes - including harijans or dalits, the ex-"untouchables" - to begin painting on paper as well. By the late 1970s, the popular success of the paintings - aesthetically distinct from other Indian painting traditions - was drawing dealers from New Delhi offering minimal prices for mass produced paintings of the most popular divinities and three familiar scenes from the Ramayana. Out of poverty, many painters complied with the dealers& #39; demands, and produced the rapid and repetitious images known as "Madhubani paintings." Nevertheless, with the encouragement of a number of outsiders - both Indian and foreign - other artists working within the same aesthetic traditions continued to produce the highly crafted, deeply individual and increasingly diverse work, now known as "Mithila Painting." 👇
- Mithila painting, as a domestic ritual activity, was unknown to the outside world until the massive Bihar earthquake of 1934. House walls had tumbled down, and the British colonial officer in Madhubani District, William G. Archer, inspecting the damage "discovered" the paintings on the newly exposed interior walls of homes. Archer - later to become the South Asia Curator at London's Victoria and Albert Museum - was stunned by the beauty of the paintings and similarities to the work of modern Western artists like Klee, Miro, and Picasso. During the 1930s he took black and white photos of some of these paintings, the earliest images we have of them. Then in a 1949 article in the Indian art journal, Marg, he brought the wall paintings to public attention. Then a second natural disaster, a severe draught in the late 1960s, prompted the All India Handicrafts Board to encourage a few upper caste women in villages around Madhubani town to transfer their ritual wall paintings to paper as an income generating project. Drawing on the region's rich visual culture, contrasting "line painting" and "color painting" traditions, and their individual talents, several of these women turned out to be superb artists. Four of them were soon representing India in cultural fairs in Europe, Russia, and the USA. Their national and international recognition prompted many other women from many other castes - including harijans or dalits, the ex-"untouchables" - to begin painting on paper as well. By the late 1970s, the popular success of the paintings - aesthetically distinct from other Indian painting traditions - was drawing dealers from New Delhi offering minimal prices for mass produced paintings of the most popular divinities and three familiar scenes from the Ramayana. Out of poverty, many painters complied with the dealers' demands, and produced the rapid and repetitious images known as "Madhubani paintings." Nevertheless, with the encouragement of a number of outsiders - both Indian and foreign - other artists working within the same aesthetic traditions continued to produce the highly crafted, deeply individual and increasingly diverse work, now known as "Mithila Painting." 👇

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